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31
NAS
by TrueJournals
Permalink:   (32 comments)
Description

Used simply for a NAS. 7.1 TB in RAID-Z running FreeNAS.

Haven't been running it very long, but performance seems fine. There are some small software oddities with FreeNAS I'd like to figure out (such as not filling up the SSD), but it seems to perform as well as it could!

$20 rebate on both the RAM and PSU from NewEgg.

Details
AMD A4-3300 2.5GHz Dual-Core Processor
CPU Clock Rate2.5GHz
CPU Temperature While Idle-
CPU Temperature Under Load-
Comments
When commenting on a completed build please keep your feedback polite and constructive, particularly if commenting on part choices and possible alternatives.
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Sorted by:
 
 
Smily 4 points 16 months ago

Dammmnnnnn... this build is NASty!

 
 
DDawg426 1 point 2 days ago

Nasty like Nas ;)

 
 
edman545 [10 Builds] 3 points 16 months ago

This is just about perfect for sharing a boat load of media among a few computers. Sure a dual core cpu might be overkill, but for $40 you can't really go lower.

I would look into putting two low RPM fans in the front of the case just to take a few degrees off of the HDD temps. The red drives are usually pretty cool anyway, but fans are cheap and heat is the enemy.

That or even removable drive cages. Something like this should work: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817994077

I've replaced a drive on my NAS once already and the hassle saved with a removable tray was easily worth the cost in my opinion.

 
 
smittypantz@hotmail.com [10 Builds] 2 points 16 months ago

Very cool build thanks for sharing.

 
 
dschutt84 [3 Builds] 2 points 16 months ago

I love NAS's, best budget idea for Home Servers and Backups. This is a great build and for a great price. You cant even get a decent 5 bay NAS without HDD for $750. Also this CPU might even be over kill for a NAS for the person saying you should have opted for a X4. Also this is a NAS not a gaming machine. No need for a 5970 gpu. You only access these things though the network via IP Address. Great work!!!!

 
 
TrueJournals [Submitter] [1 Build] 1 point 16 months ago

Thanks :)

I did look into dedicated NAS solutions, but, like you pointed out, they're crazy expensive. It's awesome to be able to DIY for about $200 (price for everything excluding SSD and HDDs). Plus, with RAID-Z I'm not locked into any hardware vendor which, IMO, is a huge benefit.

 
 
Psymon 2 points 16 months ago

Any reason for software over hardware RAID?

 
 
TrueJournals [Submitter] [1 Build] 1 point 16 months ago

A few reasons! First, hardware RAID is typically expensive. Some SATA PCI cards (and even this mobo) "support RAID", but this is really software RAID programmed into the BIOS, not "true hardware RAID". The true hardware RAID cards are expensive.

Second, vendor lock-in. If you buy a hardware RAID card and it breaks, you typically have to find the same exact RAID card, since each lays out RAID a bit differently. With software RAID (especially open source software RAID), you can just pop the disks in another computer if something breaks.

Third, I didn't care about speed. One of the reasons I've seen to go with hardware over software RAID is that hardware RAID tends to be faster. However, from what I've seen, modern processors close this gap. Besides, speed just wasn't a requirement for me.

 
 
th3m4dh4tt3r [1 Build] 1 point 16 months ago

Pictures of the internals? What do you store on this?

 
 
TrueJournals [Submitter] [1 Build] 2 points 16 months ago

Just put up a picture of the inside.

I mostly store media on it: pictures, video, music. I've been wanting to access my media from my network for a while (and have a LOT of storage space for it), and this does the trick! I'm also storing some backups of my computer and some small websites I run.

 
 
th3m4dh4tt3r [1 Build] 1 point 16 months ago

Awesome! How's the RAID-Z working for you?

 
 
TrueJournals [Submitter] [1 Build] 2 points 16 months ago

Seems to be working fine so far! I accidentally unplugged one of the harddrives once, and didn't plug it in when I powered it on. FreeNAS alerted me that one drive seemed to be bad, but that all my data was preserved :)

Speed wasn't a big concern for me, and I haven't done any read/write speed testing, so I can't speak to that. What I wanted was to ensure data integrity, and I've heard RAID-Z/ZFS is designed for that.

 
 
th3m4dh4tt3r [1 Build] 1 point 16 months ago

Interesting, thanks for the info :D

 
 
Azote [3 Builds] 1 point 16 months ago

What's a NAS.? and what does it do. store files i guess?

 
 
TrueJournals [Submitter] [1 Build] 1 point 16 months ago

NAS stands for "Network Attached Storage". As you guessed, it does store files, which can be accessed from any computer on the network. You can even set up permissions so that two users can't access each others files if that's necessary.

 
 
Azote [3 Builds] 1 point 16 months ago

:O, so its like a cloud storage, but connected to your network! That's pretty nice.

 
 
TrueJournals [Submitter] [1 Build] 1 point 16 months ago

That's basically the idea :) You can even set it up to be accessible over the Internet if you want (with the right software).

 
 
Azote [3 Builds] 1 point 16 months ago

Awesome! but isn't 7.1 tb a bit excessive? I mean, Its alot of memory!

 
 
TrueJournals [Submitter] [1 Build] 1 point 16 months ago

It is a lot of storage space, but part of my idea was to have a build that would last me a long time without running out of space. Plus, full HD videos can easily take 20-50 GB each... so I can store a lot of those now :D

 
 
gsingh2793 1 point 15 months ago

I'm planning on building a NAS soon and I've got a few questions. Is the difference between SATA II and III noticeable when accessing or transferring files back and forth? Also is it difficult to setup access from outside the network?

 
 
TrueJournals [Submitter] [1 Build] 1 point 14 months ago

Sorry... haven't been checking PCPartPicker very often...

I can't say anything about the difference between SATA II and SATA III. Regardless, I think the limit will more be in your network than SATA II vs. III. But, I don't have anything to back that up. Since I wasn't worried about speed for this build, I went for low price and reliable harddrives above everything else.

It's not very difficult to setup access from outside as long as you know how to do port forwarding on your router. FreeNAS itself has a built-in SSH server which you could forward, and use something like WinSCP to access files if you want simple and easy. I actually just installed ownCloud on this box, and I have to admit that it provides a really nice interface. Overall, there's a lot of different ways to accomplish that, depending on what you want.

 
 
jchamb49 [1 Build] 1 point 11 months ago

what da heck???

why all the 2TB HDD's?????

 
 
TrueJournals [Submitter] [1 Build] 1 point 5 months ago

Because it's a "Network Attached Storage" box... the whole point is to have a lot of storage...

 
 
ownerbeast 1 point 6 months ago

why so much STORAGE

 
 
TrueJournals [Submitter] [1 Build] 1 point 5 months ago

Because it's a "Network Attached Storage" box... the whole point is to have a lot of storage...

[comment deleted]
 
 
Frostbyter 2 points 16 months ago

Plain and simple in the description. "Used simply for a NAS. 7.1 TB in RAID-Z running FreeNAS." Literally the first line.

[comment deleted]
 
 
TrueJournals [Submitter] [1 Build] 1 point 16 months ago

I'm running FreeNAS 8.3.1-p2. There is no page.sys file... it's not Windows.

 
 
Gizmosis350k -1 points 16 months ago

Sure you wanted to go with an APU for this rig? Could've used a X4 ya know with a 5970

 
 
TrueJournals [Submitter] [1 Build] 2 points 16 months ago

Honestly... I went for the cheapest processor I could get. I knew my processor requirement wasn't all that high, so I went as low end as I could. It's possible another option could have ended up being cheaper with a different mobo, but this seemed like an easy option.

 
 
Gizmosis350k 1 point 16 months ago

I see, it's an awesome budget build though Seeing this may make me get one soon - so with Raid Z do you have all the space or only 1 passthrough virtual disk?

 
 
TrueJournals [Submitter] [1 Build] 1 point 16 months ago

RAID-Z is similar to RAID-5: one disk is used as a parity drive, and the others are pooled together. With the 5*2 TB HDDs in here, I'm getting about 7.1 TB (10 TB total-2 TB for parity-advertised/actual capacity difference).

This is a bit of a simplified view of how it ACTUALLY works, but it's good enough. With RAID-Z, the parity is actually distributed across the drives, and small files are mirrored, since that's cheaper than doing the parity calculation. RAID-Z also doesn't have the write hole problem of RAID-5, but I'm not savvy enough to be able to explain that well.

I'll also note that I got really lucky on the harddrives here. Usually they go for about $120 each, but NewEgg had them on sale for $100 each. That saved me $100!

 
 
Gizmosis350k 1 point 16 months ago

Thanks, I'll look into RAID-Z and FreeNAS for my storage solution, since not taking enough precaution has caused some data loss in the past