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24
Build for Cousin Daisy
by EcoDave
Permalink:   (22 comments)
Description

10/25/13 Building a new general purpose computer for my cousin's Family who have an ancient PC that needs to be replaced... desperately.

They were thinking of saving up money for a uber expensive iMac and I said F that Sht... I can build a faster, better Computer for half the price. Stay tuned.

-Cougar Spike Case: One of the cheapest cases with a USB 3.0 port and a slot for SSD mounting.

  • PNY Optimas: cheapest dual channel 8GB DDR3 with heatsinks at the time of this build.

  • Core i3 4340 and AsRock H81M-HDS, Best Haswell Combo deal at Microcenter after combing both in shopping cart: $173.17 total

-Samsung EVO SSD: Cannot cheap out here, this SSD will provide the best user experience for a long time.

-Corsair 430W PSU : Lowest priced modular PSU

[video card can be added a later time if user decides it is needed. I plan on re-using the ancient cd-rom and HDD in their old PC, if possible.]

10/26/13 Just waiting on the SSD which should be here Monday or Tuesday.

Details
Intel Core i3-4340 3.6GHz Dual-Core Processor
CPU Clock Rate3.6GHz
CPU Temperature While Idle41.0° C
CPU Temperature Under Load-
Comments
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Sorted by:
 
 
deathfromup [5 Builds] 4 points 10 months ago

Good family computer build. That SSD will blow ur aunt and uncle's minds.

 
 
skemble [16 Builds] 4 points 10 months ago

More like 1/5 the price! Good work!

 
 
Starlana [2 Builds] 3 points 9 months ago

"and I said F that Sht... I can build a faster, better Computer for half the price"

LOL, I just loved that part. Great build as well. :D

 
 
EcoDave [Submitter] [1 Build] 2 points 9 months ago

Ha, Thanks! :)

 
 
SirCatManDoo [1 Build] 2 points 10 months ago

Awesome build. The RAM looks expensive though since it is 1333Mhz, when exactly did you buy that?

 
 
EcoDave [Submitter] [1 Build] 3 points 10 months ago

The difference between 1333 and 1600 is basically nothing.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dWgzA2C61z4

They purchased the RAM last week.

http://pcpartpicker.com/parts/memory/#s=301333,301600&t=11&v=1250,1350,1500&z=8192&c=90,80,70&h=1&n=2&sort=a8

NCIX doesn't clean up their website so they still have RAM that has sold out a long time ago when Prices were way down. If you just look at the main stores like Newegg and Amazon, there is only a couple of RAM available in the $65-$69 range and that is because of a limited time promotion or clearance sale.

 
 
ReDnAx1991 [6 Builds] 2 points 10 months ago

+1 for the part selection, great choice going for single core performance I3 above multicore performance AMD in a build like this (no people AMD can not compete with Intel in single core performance applications and most applications are single core optimized) and +infinite for F that sht.

 
 
Marsigne 1 point 9 months ago

Hey, did you needed to apply thermal paste to somewhere or just put all together? I am interested in building computer with that same CPU, and maybe same mobo (it will be Micro ATX but not sure if exactly the yours, can you tell me?). Can you tell me where to learn how to build it? Or where you learned? Also, you didn't put a optical drive? It waasn't needed? How you installed OS then? (or you passed it?) Thanks :)

 
 
EcoDave [Submitter] [1 Build] 2 points 9 months ago

Hi Marsigne, default Intel Coolers already have pre-applied thermal grease on the heatsink. There is no need to buy anything else or to apply it yourself.

Unlike previous generation Core i3's, the Haswell Core i3 4340 is a great Processor. With Hyper-Threading, it can do pretty much anything. I ran Battlefield 4 with it, using my own graphics card- a Radeon 6870, and it did just fine on High Settings (no AA, or Ambient occlusion though). It is an awesome CPU for the cost.

The Motherboard is great, plenty of options in the BIOS (UEFI style). If you have a Microcenter nearby, they have a $30 discount on CPU+Motherboard bundle.

I learned computer building using Youtube tutorials: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5ETu53QfDwk http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W4Js2A1qdB8 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0bUghCx9iso

No Optical Drive, You can install Windows 7 and 8 from a USB flash drive. I used PowerISO which has an option to create bootable USB thumb drives. It's Free to download. http://www.poweriso.com/

 
 
Marsigne 1 point 9 months ago

Hey, thanks for the answer :) can you answer me these questions? (if you want of course lol)

  1. You didn't mounted optical drive, but, can I mount it if I want? Because just in case? (for example, an installation in which it must be made in the disk and can't be made in USB Flash Drive)

  2. You learned by watching where cables are, right? Because I think the most difficult part is routing cables and stuff, which is hard to learn in video because either he skip it (many does) or does not explain it properly (that's my thinking, idk if it's true lol)), if you can, can you give me a link to a website or video which explains properly the cables positioning?.

  3. Did you needed to buy an additional part other than that came from the parts? I mean, the screwdriver, cables, everything were in the bundle or needed to buy something additional? If you needed to buy an additional screwdriver, can you link me a good one for building?

  4. You had to read the manual to learn where cable goes or you learned with youtube videos? If with youtube videos, can you tell me which videos are good explaining the cables and where they go? Thanks again :)

 
 
EcoDave [Submitter] [1 Build] 3 points 9 months ago
  1. Yes, You can install an Optical Drive, I have a Blu-Ray burner on my new build that I will be posting up soon. I have had that thing for 3 years now and have only used it a couple of times. In my experiences, I find that All Drivers and software can be downloaded from a manufacturers website.

  2. You learn as you go. I have built about 10 systems for friends and Family over the past few years and I get better at it with each build. Cable Management largely depends on the Computer Case and the PSU (Modular is better. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ERhxmzQR6xA My new build is a tiny Mini-ITX rig and there is no cable management whatsoever.

  3. Everything you need comes with the parts you buy. For Example, the Case comes with screws, the motherboard comes with sata cables, a good CPU cooler comes with its own thermal compound, etc. I have had lots of tools for many years for doing housework, car maintenance, etc. A regular Screwdriver is all you need but I also highly recommend Needle Nose Pliers or tweezers as well, just in case you drop screws into the case or you need to undo clips, etc etc. This will cover everything for your build: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16899261003

  4. Usually, the Cables are labeled, as well as the connectors on the motherboard. You will see triangles pointing to where they need to be connected. The side that has the triangle is the Positive connector and the other side is negative. Always Plug Positive to Positive and Negative to Negative. The Motherboard instruction manual will have more detailed information.

 
 
Quintana 1 point 9 months ago

Really good build for the money, as a daily use family PC this should last them for 5+ years I would think. The SSD alone should still be adequate for their next upgrade. Toss a mid range GPU in there and you have a really potent little gaming computer.

 
 
JaggerPT 1 point 7 months ago

If it isn't too inconvinient to you, can you measure the distance between the side grills to the back of the case. I want to know because I want to know if I can install a h80i in a pysh-pull configuration as well as two fans on the side grills....

 
 
watermanjh [2 Builds] 1 point 7 months ago

Looking at buying the same motherboard, how quick is the boot time? I've had motherboards before that took ~10 sec before they even started loading windows. Trying to avoid that.

Thanks,

 
 
jimmywatsup 1 point 4 months ago

how is that mobo treating you?

 
 
Camboy05 1 point 1 month ago

Does that motherboard have on board wifi?

 
 
Rolphy [2 Builds] -2 points 10 months ago

nice build, would of went with an AMD APU rather than an i3, could saved some money there

 
 
EcoDave [Submitter] [1 Build] 3 points 10 months ago

Which AMD APU? Correct me if I am wrong but AMD does not have any 22nm Processors. Let's compare 2 similar price points $139.99:

http://www.cpu-world.com/Compare/442/AMD_A10-Series_A10-6800K_vs_Intel_Core_i3_i3-4340.html

Wait, what?... a quad core 4.1Ghz+ AMD APU that is slower than a Core i3? And it consumes more power too; 100w vs 56w I can just imagine how much slower a cheaper AMD APU would be. Thanks. but no thanks.

And the Haswell combo deal at microcenter makes the motherboard $22.99 (not $52.99)

 
 
Rolphy [2 Builds] 1 point 10 months ago

my apologies, im from Australia so the pricing is significantly different.

Most of the AMD Apu's are about 50% of all the i3's here

 
 
EcoDave [Submitter] [1 Build] 2 points 10 months ago

And You get what you pay for (The exception being APPLE pc's). Let's take a look at an AMD APU at half the price. http://www.microcenter.com/product/414787/A6_6400K_Black_Edition_39GHz_Dual-Core_Socket_FM2_Boxed_Processor

Apparently it is 50% the performance as well in all kinds of applications, and the graphics performance is worse too.

http://www.cpu-world.com/Compare/352/AMD_A6-Series_A6-6400K_vs_Intel_Core_i3_i3-4340.html