Description

Hello. This is my 2019 Budget PC for us Australians. I made this as I know it can be very hard to build a quality pc in Australia at an affordable price.

(NOTE): I know I left the ram out of the build as I personally, already have 16GB of ram and do not need an upgrade. Ram is relatively inexpensive and can be picked up for around 100$ more. Alternatively; If you already have 16GB of decent high-speed ram. Just use that in this build. Its just ram.

*AMD Ryzen 7 3800X 3.9 GHz 8-Core Processor

Notes: This will be my first ever AMD CPU and for any long-time Intel users, you may be skeptical about making the switch. However, AMD has come a long way and its CPU's price to performance ratio is extremely good. Originally this build would have had a i9 9700k. But against instincts, I decided to give AMD's new zen lineup a read and after looking at a look of benchmarks the i9 line comes out underwhelming. With the top Intel processor performing only 2% better for almost 250$ more than the AMD equivalent. And even then, this was under very ideal circumstances. So for this build the Ryzen 7 will be our go-to; sporting an awesome 3.9Ghz base clock up 4.5Ghz.

*Cooler Master Hyper 212 RGB Black Edition 57.3 CFM CPU Cooler

Notes: Getting a third party cooler is of course, optional; however, I really do recommend getting one as this CPU will get hot like AMD CPU's do with their 8-cores. If you decided to leave this out I would not suggest overclocking this CPU as even with a third-party cooler, this CPU becomes unstable at 4.5-4.6GHz.

*MSI MPG X570 GAMING PLUS ATX AM4 Motherboard

Notes: Unlike my previous builds: I have decided to go all out on this motherboard this time around, especially after having quite a bit of problem with cheap Micro-ATX boards. There is not really too much to say about this other than this is a very good future-proofed board that will still open the door to future CPU and RAM upgrades.

*Seagate Barracuda Compute 2 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive

Notes: I think we are at the point where 1TB is not enough; especially with most AAA games taking up well over 100GB's nowadays. If you have an existing PC feel free to use that HDD as well. At this point, you may have noticed my exclusion of an SSD. (I know shock and awe) But the fact of the matter is; to keep this at the 2000$ budget, for a high-performance PC. Some exemptions are going to have to be made. Also for the PC being aimed at an Australian consumer base. SSD's are grossly overpriced here. It is up to you If you want to fork out the extra 250$ for an SSD. But for now. Its a no for me.

*Gigabyte GeForce RTX 2060 SUPER 8 GB WINDFORCE OC Video Card

Notes: This part of the build is where you can decide if you want to spend more money. However, to keep this at the $2000 price point. The new RTX 2060 will be our GPU. GPU's have kinda been a thorn for me in recent years due to how fast they are being released and them being grossly overpriced here in Aus. However, I could not call this a 2019 build if it could not support ray tracing. This, however, is the minimum for it. And if you really want to safeguard your GPU. I would suggest getting a 2070 OC. But for pretty much any game today and the foreseeable future. This GPU will not let you down. Cries In RD2

*NZXT H510 Elite ATX Mid Tower Case

Notes: Awesome case for its price. Its always been too hard to get a decent tempered glass case in Australia. This case sports to 140mm fans at the front and one rear 140mm fan. Creating a default positive air pressure in the case.

*Corsair LL120 RGB 63 CFM 120 mm Fan

Notes: This is an optional addition for the top of the case and not necessary if you on a very strict budget. I would have this fan blowing outwards rather than in if you have your PC vertical to blow out excess heat that rises for the CPU. Visa vera if you have it on its side as heat will be rising to your case.

*Corsair RM (2019) 750 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply

Notes I tend never to go cheap on a PSU and safeguard it a lot as if you start drawing more than you can put out, you risk shorting your system and damaging more parts in the prosses. I do not recommend getting a 550W or 650W for this build as if you do decide to overclock; you may be walking on a thin line with that. Also, take PC partpickers wattage guide for a grain of salt. Use this instead - https://outervision.com/power-supply-calculator

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Comments

  • 3 months ago
  • 2 points

+1 for Straya! Looks great mate more photos of the beast please :)

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

Got all core OC at 4.4gHz at 1.45V on my 3700x and RTX 2070 SUPER running on a 650W PSU. But your right, never hurts to have excess Juice

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

Yeah, I have had a 550w psu blow at one stage with a 1060 and i5 so I think its just ptsd that made me get that.

  • 3 months ago
  • 0 points

For people looking at this as a guide:

If you are only gaming, the 3800x is absolutely not worth it over the 3600 which can be had for $275-320 usually. If you need to tackle productivity tasks, the 3700x is good, and this 3800x is fine. This 3800x is almost double the price of the 3600, yet offers only a 6% increase in speed during gaming, so it is only worth it if you really need it for specific applications.

The MSI MPG motherboard runs extremely hot, and unless you really need the features of a x570, in general, you're better off with a B450 motherboard when using a 3700x or a lesser CPU. Can shave $100 off of this.

No SSD? In 2019?

If the $245 H510 Elite is worth an extra $110 or almost double than the regular H510 at $135, then good for you but that $110 would have gone a very long way towards efficiency and speed in purchasing an SSD.

The 2060 Super is a fine GPU, but unless you need the CUDA cores why not go 5700XT which is just about the same price for superior performance?

Good PSU but 750W is absolutely unnecessary, could've got a 550W Corsair CX or TX for $100 or $120 and saved $60-$40 respectively.

$40 for a single case fan, $60 for an optional cooler, these are good to have but for the price, an SSD would go infinitely further in terms of performance.

Overall, while this is good system, there's a couple hundred dollars to be saved or reallocated for way better improvement.

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

I primarily use this working with auto CAD, not that this pc would not destroy any game it get thrown at it . Hence the rather pricey CPU. The price on the motherboard has gone waaay up and you are right its probs to expesive now and needs a change but I think I may have gotten a discount on it. As for the GPU, I think i may have wrote somewhere in the build that is part is up to you. I personally like Nivida gpus better than amd and belive they have a much better longevity to them. The absence of an ssd in this build it simply to keep it below the 2000 dollar mark. I do say if you would like to spend more go get one. I just know being a poor uni student budgets are hard and most pc guides go 200-300 dollars over. Im not sure if you are an Australian citizen but you may not have realized all of these parts are also from the same vendor. This is to save on rediculous postage cost in Aus. I think with all my dicounts honey gave me this costs around 1995 with postage. Also. If you are an Australian you will know the stupid ambeiant temps we get here and that those Coolers are completely nessasary. And the psu. Check out the link i gave you in the guide at the bottom. 550 w is not enough.

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

I am an Australian uni student too, working with CAD and 3D Modelling too, primarily Rhino, Revit, the Adobe Suite, VRAY, Lumion. So I'm quite familiar with what's required and how we get shafted by extra costs. When calling this a guide, you should've made it very clear or at least just stated the purposes, because 99.5% of people won't need a 3800x and the $280 is much better spent elsewhere, let alone calling a $2k build a 'budget build'.

Regardless of everything, you could've cut $80 from the 3800x and just bought a 3700x which is borderline the same CPU; that 80 bucks would've made such a big difference in an SSD. The same goes for the $110 uselessly wasted on the elite version of that case, as well as a 570x motherboard which is wholly unnecessary and a further waste of $100. Not to mention you could've also put the $80 of the HDD towards an SSD first and then a HDD which is far less important.

And your justification for Nvidia is a bit of a joke, that's purely subjective and meaningless. The actual justification would be that you have gone with Nvidia for the CUDA cores which are critical to the CAD applications that you use, but again I would have known this if you had simply indicated that this was a build for CAD and not your everyday Australian who just wants to game at 1080p 60fps.

If you are a uni student shouldn't you be living in a city, with plenty of access to stores to pick up from? I never pay postage on builds, either hunt down the best prices at brick and mortar stores like MSY, Mwave, Umart, PCCG, Scorptec etc, or buy from an ebay sale with ebay Plus trials which give free shipping for most stuff.

And again with the PSU, you could've got a 650 at least if you're adamant about not getting a 550 and put the extra cash into an SSD or 2070 Super or whatever else. Those PSU Calculators tend to lie in order to sell you a bigger PSU and make more money, but regardless it put my wattage in the 400s, as yours should be unless you're running SLI which is not the case. A 550 TXM for $119, or even the base CX for $95 would've done the same job and let you put the saved cash into somewhere that'll make the difference.

Sorry if I've come across as harsh, but when you've marketed this as a guide I don't want people wasting hundreds of dollars because of it.

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

I'm fairly certain that in this guide I do hint to parts that can be subject to change and yes I think it was pretty obvious that my GPU choice was subjective. However, the reason I did not say any of this is a very much doubt any person actually sees a PC guide/build and decides that is the exact one they want and proceed to throw 2000+ dollars at it without any further reading. Like pretty much every other guide on this website this was simply used as a baseline. In this build, I have given people the opportunity to have an extremely good CPU and a powerful GPU; along with I nice MOBO and cooling system that is very inexpensive when you look at it compared to others. All for under 2000$ AUS. I knew when I wrote this guide I would never hear the end of the absence of an SSD; even after writing in the guide that if you would like to buy one, by all means, buy one. I'm sure I'm not screwing anyone out of buying one just because of its absence here. And if I truly am and some curses my name when they blindly build this pc and realize they can't get marginally better load times on certain applications. Then god help me. And no, I live in an inner regional city that has no PC stores with the closest being 2 hours away and even then has insanely marked-up prices. So no. Shopping around to brick and mortar shops would be a rediculous nightmare for me and massive time waste. Not everyone can afford to be a hipster uni student living in Brisbane, Sydney, Melbourne. Also, AMD's streaming processors and Nvidia's CUDA cores are virtually the same things. So that did not influence my decision at all when buying a Nivida GPU. But yes, I do believe Nivida GPU's are better at running scaleform applications, etc. Your evaluation of the PSU site I linked is up to you. I doubt myself they are lieing about the wattages but so be it.

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

Do you have any builds of your own ? I want to build my First gaming / streaming computer .. and I just need something that can do both with out lag and frame drops .. can you recommend me a build please

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

Hey.. I’m Canadian and I have a budget of $1750 can you help me with building the optimal computer for both gaming and streaming ? I don’t know much about computers at all.. you seem like you know a lot more than me

  • 26 days ago
  • 1 point

Bit late but Canadian dollar value is not much different from Australia. I suggest you just use this build but mabey just change the GPU or CPU to something a lower to match your budget. Gonna be honest. 1700 is not enough to make any 'serious' streaming pc. Most streamers these days don't even use the computer they are playing a game on to stream on. They instead have an entirely different 'streaming pc' that they use. I think you may have to save up a bit more and increase your budget if you are gonna stream. A 1750$ pc is gonna be a tight fit for even a mid to high-end pc as I assume that price includes postage as well which is something a lot of people do not take into account and can easily add another 200 onto the price. (Is the reason this build is all from the same vendor). I personally suggest you build a pc in your 1750 budget. Then save up for a 600$ streaming pc.

  • 3 months ago
  • -1 points

Only thing wrong with your choices is your GPU, the 2060 super and 2070 both fall short of the RX 5700xt while the 5700xt being cheaper than both (depending what 2060 super you get because of the RGB models put it above the 450 marks but the 5700xt is 394 flat)

and your motherboard the Msi isn't doing to good on the Mb this gen I personally chose the x570 gigabyte aorus board \

now this is all opinion

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

Ref to Benaccess3 post. I very much doubt the 5700 is better than any RTX GPU.

  • 3 months ago
  • 0 points

ok buddy idk where you got the 5700 but the 5700xt outperforms both 2060 super and 2070 and you can reference videos if you need proof

Bruhh i just read it again the 5700 competes with the 2060 normal version just fine look at benaccesss3 post too he even shows benchmarks showing them even