Description

My old AMD 8350 machine was grinding to a halt so decided to upgrade to the new Intel i7-6700 chipset and also take a plunge into the world of M.2 drives.

I have an existing MSI R9 390 8GB card which I will port over into the new machine, possibly for an upgrade next year or the year after.

This is my first solo build so will be looking for some guidance I'm sure.

About to start my build, so fingers crossed!

Picture 1

Installation of motherboard onto the case, and a very bendy I/0 shield. Brand new chip seated and RAM installed. Never seen a requirement to fill the memory slots 2 and 4 first, but this is only my 3rd ever motherboard so what do know.

Picture 2

M.2 Drive installed and power supply base in place. Now comes the exciting bit!

Picture 3

Cooler, radiator and graphics card installed. This gave me a bit of a headache with the radiator - in my head it was in the formation of radiator / fans / case - with the fans sucking air in and blowing over the radiator, but there was no way I could get this to work. So in the end I went fans / radiator / case with the fans in exhaust mode. Does anybody have any comments on this?

For some reason the cooler I have is not on the parts list on this site, so I have left it off.

Picture 4

The completed build - not 100% happy with the cabling but I like it. Mainly unhappy with the the big exhaust fan at the back (couldn't see any way to route that to the header in the middle of the board) and the CPU fan which hangs over the RAM slots before going out and around to plug in at the top of the case.

Picture 5

Not a great picture because of reflections but meant to show the final build - I added two extra 120mm fans at the bottom of the case to create a positive airflow. I also used white LED lights for a subtle glow which matches that of the MSI card. Can't wait to see this is the dark.

Fan set up is 4 fans (2 at the front, 2 at the bottom front sucking air in, and 3 fans expelling air, with the 2 x 120mm fan on the radiators and a larger, 140mm fan on the rear of the case.

So far these are all plugged into the motherboard, and running now on low load is practically silent.

Let's see how the testing goes!

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Comments

  • 44 months ago
  • 2 points

Nice. I saw that board and thought, "One of these chips is not like the others. One of these chips is a...storage device?"

  • 44 months ago
  • 2 points

Haha and you were right! Lightning quick, boots into Windows in just under 5 seconds

  • 44 months ago
  • 2 points

hehehe

  • 44 months ago
  • 1 point

Nice upgrade!!!! :) +1

  • 44 months ago
  • 1 point

Good first start. Does that Corsair case have any type of fan controller built in? Could help eliminate fan cables going to your mobo. If not, you could always purchase one, they're pretty cheap.

It looks like you could route that cable going over your RAM up and around. Is there enough slack?

Your build looked like mine when I first did it with my Corsair 760t. I ended up ripping it apart and redoing all my cable management. I went to Walmart and bought a bag of zip ties to help.

However, in the end I got rid of my AIO cooler. The extra cables and look of the tubing bugged the heck out of me. I ended up replacing with an EK water loop and I have zero regrets.

  • 44 months ago
  • 1 point

Hi, no no fan controller - I have one sat next to me, ready to install if needed, but I wanted to run my tests first see if it was needed.

I think I need to turn my cooler around 90 degrees - this might help with the fan cable too. Not sure where you are thinking when you say up and around?

What did you do differently second time with the cables?

  • 44 months ago
  • 1 point
Nice build, it looks good. +1
What liquid cooler is that? You mentioned it was not on PCPP but you could add it in your Customs with the part-list you have.
  • 44 months ago
  • 1 point

Hi

It's an Asetek 570LX... I'll have a look at how that's done, thanks.

  • 44 months ago
  • 1 point
- Select Saved Part List. Now search and select your part list that is being used for your Completed Build and click Edit Part List.
- Now scroll down to the bottom of the list until you Custom. Click Add Custom Part.
- Once you see a Add Custom Part appear with the options to type in a Part Name / Description, Part Type, Part URL (optional), Part Price (optional) and Mark this custom part as already purchased (you only do this if you have a price set for it or do not have to if zero out or yes could regardless.)
- When you are done editing this custom part, click the Button Add Custom Part. It should appear on your list.
- Once you are done with this process, save your edified part list. Click Save As and save it to your current list you have it linked to your Completed Build.
- If the updated list has not updated your Completed Build than go to your Completed Builds and click Edit. When you have it edit mode. At the left of screen, you should Part List. Click the button Edit and find your part list by the Choose Part List.
  • 44 months ago
  • 1 point

Sexy build! congrats. +1+1+1!

Caroline.

  • 44 months ago
  • 1 point

+1 for motherboard I love mine!

  • 41 months ago
  • 1 point

I've read that Windows 7 won't "play well" with Skylake CPUs, and I've also heard of problems with booting from M.2 SSDs with Windows 7. Did you have any problems with using Windows 7?