Description

My new work rig at NZXT!

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Comments

  • 58 months ago
  • 2 points

Definitely stepped the game up for new employees! Welcome to the team.

  • 58 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks! Excited to be working with such a great team!

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  • 58 months ago
  • 1 point

It's a refreshingly positive and open work environment. The people are great; focused and serious, but still friendly and fun.

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  • 58 months ago
  • 1 point

Dude hope you have fun at NZXT! Great build, you got my upvote! holy crap, the cables are awesome!

  • 58 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks!

  • 58 months ago
  • 1 point

awesome looking case. Was that painted? Also, how was the installation for the 4460 on that mobo? Heard some things about bios issues regarding installation.

  • 58 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks! I painted the case. I was impressed how easy it was to disassemble the panels and remove the window and wire mesh for painting. Would love to do a few more custom builds with this case.

I had no issues with the 4460 and this mobo. The mobo is a bit limiting in that it only has two PCI-E slots and two memory slots. It was a bit tricky to get it to boot from USB for installing Windows, but it would be easier for someone familiar with ASRock's BIOS interface. Other than that it runs fine and stays pretty cool with this case (typically 41C ).

  • 57 months ago
  • 1 point

That paint job looks absolutely incredible! Shame that not so much can be said about the components, but I suppose it's only an office PC.

  • 57 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks. You should see me totally destroy PowerPoint.

  • 57 months ago
  • 1 point

Any pictures of the painting process? =D

  • 57 months ago
  • 2 points

I added a few of the painting pics. They aren't very good as I was just using my phone (didn't want to get my DSLR lens dirty). Basically I disassembled the case, sanded the original paint a bit, masked, primed, taped, painted, and clear coated. With three different colors, the taping and painting steps took a while to ensure the paint was cured before taping again. Waited a week before I sprayed on the clear. I will probably use my air gun next time to get a better quality paint finish.

  • 57 months ago
  • 1 point

thanks for the reply~ Any tips for someone who has never painted before? The last time I did it I only sprayed a layer without knowing how to do sanding, base coat, layering etc. Also, will you pain the grill in the future? =D

  • 57 months ago
  • 2 points

The biggest tip I can give you is take your time. A good paint job is all about preparation. I had to rush mine a bit as I was starting work and needed the computer ready in time for that. It still took me a month to get it all done.

Regardless of whether you are painting plastic or metal I always start by sanding the surface down. You don't need to go to bare metal, just enough to get rid of any existing orange peel or other imperfections. I typically use 400 and then 600 grit, but some people go all of the way up to 1200+. Personally I think this is overkill.

The next step is priming. I took a short cut and used a spray can primer for this case. It's OK, but an HVLP spray gun with a good automotive primer will give better results. If it's your first time, rattle cans will be less expensive as you don't need to buy extra equipment and the paint also tends to be more expensive. It helps to heat the primer (and paint) in hot water for a few minutes before painting. Also make sure you shake the can well and paint when it's relatively warm and humidity is low. Check the manufacturer's recommendations. Either way, you'll want to lay down a very light coat to start with and then build up from there. Pay attention to the recommended time between coats and the maximum time for getting all coats down. Also, make sure that your area is clean and free from dust. Also wear a mask. You don't want to breathe in this stuff. One the primer has cured, usually 24 hours, I will sand again. This time I start at 600 and work up to 800. Again, some will recommend even finer grit as the primer surface will determine how good your final paint looks. I wet sand to get a smooth surface and make my sand paper last a bit longer. You will need to use sand paper that specifically says it's for wet sanding. If you go all of the way through the primer, which is easy to do on edges, you will want to prime over any of these areas. The primer helps the paint adhere to the surface, so don't shortcut this or your paint may start peeling or chipping later on.

Now for the fun part. Once the primer surface is smooth I will clean the surface with a tack cloth and then start laying down my color. I keep my area and hands clean, so I don't need to worry about using a cleaner on the primer, but you want to make sure there aren't any oils or grease on the primed surface. Again, I used rattle cans for this project and that would be the best way to get started, but a good automotive paint will usually produce better results. Lacquer tends to go on more smoothly, but is illegal in lots of places, so I tend to look for the best enamel that I can afford. I also match the type of primer to the type of paint and clear I will use. You can use different types, but you will need to pay attention to cure times in between coats.

I did multiple colors, but I would recommend a single color for your first time. I used 3M automotive masking tape that provides a nice sharp line with minimal bleed. I detacked the tape a bit on my jeans to make sure it wouldn't pull the previous layer of paint off when I removed it. Spray the first coat very lightly paying careful attention to the edges of the tape. I also burnish the edges of the tape a lot to minimize the chance that paint will seep under the tape. Again, make sure the under layer of paint has had sufficient time to cure based on weather conditions and the manufacturer's recommendations.

I didn't have time to wet sand the color layers, but for smooth final paint job it is highly recommended, especially if you want a shiny finish. Any imperfections will stand out. Matte will hide some of these. I typically use 1200 to 2000 grit and wet sand each cured coat before moving on to the next.

If you want a clear coat on top to protect the paint or give it a uniform gloss, wait for the paint to cure (I waited a week) and then apply the clear. I would have rather not used a clear coat, but one of the colors that I needed was only available in satin. The glossy clear helped unify the finish, but I was not happy with the results. Rattle can clear is tricky and the Rust-Oleum that I used did not want to lay down smooth and uniform. Next time I will go back to my HVLP spray gun, if at all.

If you are going to apply decals or pin stripe and want to clear coat your case, check the specs on the decals/pin stripe to make sure this will work. If they aren't designed for this, they could shrink and cause cracks in your clear coat. I just put mine on top of the clear so that I didn't have to worry about.

After the final paint had been cured, wet sanded, the clear coat has been applied, and cured some people will polish the clear for a super mirror finish. This doesn't remove imperfections in the paint, but will give it that mirror finish. Some wet sand, but I don't as it's too easy to over do it and not even know it. I didn't polish my clear as I ran out of time.

I usually give the clear a week or two to cure (some recommend a month) so that all of the volatiles have time to outgass and then I apply carnuba wax to protect the paint/clear and really make it shine. This might be overkill, but is easy to do once the computer is back together.

I know this is a lot to take in, but it really comes down to proper preparation and having the patience to follow the manufacturer's recommended cure times. If you have any questions let me know and good luck with your next paint job!

I'm not going to paint the mesh as I like the contrast with the paint. Reminds me of race cars and supercars with aggressive inlets and outlets for air. Also helps define the separation between the different surfaces.

  • 57 months ago
  • 1 point

10/10 Thanks for the long detailed feedback =D What does sanding actually do? Make the paint stick better?

Because I only planned to do 2x white base coat, 3x red then 1x glossifier (y'know, easier stuff) =P (all plastidip)

  • 57 months ago
  • 2 points

Np. Sanding helps make the surface smoother, removing bumps like orange peel in the original paint. It also helps make the primer adhere better to the surface.

Plastidip is a differet story. It's thicker than paint. Not sure what you'll need as far as primer to help it stick. YouTube has lots of good videos on Plastidip, I Just haven't gone that route.

  • 53 months ago
  • 1 point

Well done.

  • 53 months ago
  • 1 point

Thank you!

  • 48 months ago
  • 1 point

Hey man how do you change the led in nzxt logo?

  • 48 months ago
  • 1 point

Hey, I don't mean to sound stupid or anything, but I don't see the ram you listed in your system. Have you bought it yet?

Thanks!

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  • 58 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks!

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