Description

Where do I begin?

I originally built this rig about a year ago, and have made gradual changes to it since then. As it is now, I don't see myself doing anything else to this thing outside of a full custom liquid cooling loop. Now that I'm in college, I have to manage my money a bit better, so that custom loop won't happen for quite a while.

Anyway, the main purpose of this rig is gaming. I wanted to build something small enough to transport relatively easily but still give off a custom PC vibe close to what you get from those crazy full tower builds.

This rig kicks serious butt when it comes to games, ramping up the video settings to Very High/Ultra on basically every title. I actually increased the refresh rate of my monitor to 84Hz, so it's nice to have above 60 FPS on an IPS monitor.

The only thing I can possibly complain about when it comes to the parts is the screw holes on the Luna series fans. If you mess up the fan configuration, or want to move the fan to a different spot, you've only got a few chances before the entire screw hole gets stripped out. You could say the same about most other fans, but because the Luna series uses a rubber material on the corners of the frame, the screw holes are very susceptible to being stripped. Outside of that, all of the other parts are quality and perform exceptionally.

There isn't much else I can think of to comment on... I suppose my CPU clock speed is noteworthy. It used to be at 4.7Ghz, but I live in an apartment where electricity is included to a certain amount. I'd rather not go over that amount, so I lowered the clock speed down to 4.4GHz on stock voltage. I know that it really doesn't change a whole lot, but every little saving counts.

Well, that's about all I've got to say. If you've got any questions, or want me to elaborate on something I mentioned, please feel free to ask.

Cheers, CRS10114

Edit: Before anyone asks, I took these pictures at my friend's apartment, so all the stuff on the table is from like 3 other people. Also, for the sake of comparison, here is a link to my first build.

July of 2016 Edit: I do not plan on upgrading to a GTX 1080/1070 (or anything else that comes in this generation). I play games at 2560x1440, so in my opinion, there's no good reason to upgrade.

Comments

  • 44 months ago
  • 4 points
It's so memorizing... so beautiful... what a great build! You have my one.

I enjoyed reading your description, thanks for it!

  • 44 months ago
  • 2 points

You're very welcome! I tried to keep a coherent line of thought in my description. Thank you for the compliments, I appreciate it.

  • 44 months ago
  • 2 points

Just...wow!

  • 44 months ago
  • 2 points

Right?! I honestly get excited every time I see this thing and remember it's mine.

  • 44 months ago
  • 2 points

hahaha...yeah! Feel the same way about my build.

  • 44 months ago
  • 1 point

Dude, I totally know you and your build. It's freaking awesome!

  • 44 months ago
  • 2 points

Alrighty...thx! : 3

  • 44 months ago
  • 2 points

Great to see see Ttammy once again, +1

  • 44 months ago
  • 1 point

I'm glad Ttammy is a repeat hit! Thanks for the +1

  • 44 months ago
  • 2 points

Yes for the tentacle por (can't put in the last letter because it gets bleeped). Love these kinds of builds with those nice led fans and the aio cooler on the cpu and gpu.

  • 44 months ago
  • 1 point

Likewise. I'm really glad everything went together as well as it did.

  • 44 months ago
  • 2 points

Can you elaborate on which fans you used where? Like front,sides, and back? I'm thinking of going with this case too and the fan placements are giving me a headache to plan for my future rig.

Your build looks really great btw! Awesome led coordination.

  • 44 months ago
  • 1 point

The side with the Luna fans (the only fans with red on their frame) is the left side of the case if you're looking at the case from the front. I put text over the original picture for the fans: http://imgur.com/qDucQgt

If you need any advice about this case in the future, please feel free to ask me. I've overhauled the airflow in this case so many times, I would dare to say that I'm an expert on the subject.

Here's a couple tips:

  1. Don't expect to use 14cm fans on either the right or left side of the case because Tt didn't make the perforation on the side panels wide enough to accommodate 2x14cm fans.

  2. If you plan to use close to as many fans as I do, be sure to either magically have enough headers on your mATX motherboard or purchase a supplemental fan power hub (like the Tt Commander FX).

Hope that helps. Thanks for the compliments!

Sincerely, CRS10114

  • 44 months ago
  • 2 points

Thanks for the heads up regarding the 2x14cm fans!

Do you think you can elaborate on using static pressure or air flow type fans? As far as I know, the Luna series is air flow type, and the Riing series is static pressure? Are you using the Luna series on the left side and the front fans as intake, with the back/right sides for exhaust? (Any bottom fans? Can't tell from the picture you linked)

I know that using static pressure type fans is recommended for pushing through radiators, but I'm a bit confused on whether or not static pressure fans are better to use as normal intake/exhaust since the case seems like it has a pretty tight dust filter/mesh for the side panels.

Again, thanks for the advice!

  • 44 months ago
  • 1 point

You got the intake/exhaust setup of my fans exactly right.

As for the types of fans they are, allow me to explain.

The Riing series is in fact marketed for static pressure, and the Luna series is marketed for airflow. The only time I think that it would matter which fan type to use would be when you're choosing what fan you're going to put in the front of the case.

The front filter isn't exactly "tight", but it is fine enough to where you probably want some good pull on the air to make sure it gets in the case. Especially if you've got a radiator in the front.

As for the side filters, they're actually not bad at all when it comes to pulling in air, which is why I have the airflow fans as intake on the left side. That being said, the side filters are not that great at keeping dust out. THAT being said, they're certainly a step above just letting the side intake go unfiltered. Luckily, the side filters are magnetic, and are very easy to take off and clean.

Something I should note here, Tt only includes 2 fan mounts (meaning you can setup fans on both sides like I do), so you can't have fans on every single side (left, top, right = 8 fans). Anyway, I don't see a huge reason to have that many fans unless you've got radiators all over the place.

To sum it up about the fans:

  1. I recommend SP fans in the front
  2. You can put whatever fan you want on the side for intake (like the Riing fans in my original build, but I would recommend AF out of principle)

In case you are wondering, I have the Commander FX underneath my motherboard (I will provide a picture soon).

Anyway, I hope that this cleared things up. Again, if you have any questions, please feel free to ask. I'm happy to help.

Cheers

  • 43 months ago
  • 2 points

Hi, since it has been 10 months since you had Ttammy, will you be upgrading the GPU to a 1080/1070?

  • 43 months ago
  • 2 points

Considering the fact that I'm only running a 2560x1440 monitor, there's no good reason to buy a 1080/1070. Especially since I'm a college student who doesn't make enough money to be dropping several hundred dollars on computer components anyway.

I am content with my current build, and would really only consider upgrading anything (most likely my GPU) if I got a higher resolution screen or got a better job.

  • 42 months ago
  • 2 points

how did you increase the refresh rate of the moniter? it would help a lot if you answered. :)

  • 42 months ago
  • 1 point

I used EVGA PrecisionX. There's an option to intense the refresh rate in the settings. Be warned: you can mess up your monitor if you are not careful. Increase the refresh rate by 2Hz increments.

  • 42 months ago
  • 2 points

oh thanks. how do you tell before you mess up the moniter?

  • 42 months ago
  • 1 point

Well, you don't really mess up the monitor per se. You just keep doing it until the screen turns off. PrecisionX has a 15 second timer, so if you set the refresh rate too high and the monitor turns off, then the screen will go back to normal in 15 seconds.

  • 42 months ago
  • 2 points

oh lol. ok thanks a lot man!

  • 37 months ago
  • 1 point

some reviewers claim that anything over 70Hrz, Makes the Monitor skip frames, so you not really have a true 84Hrz

Can you Please double check this?? im intrested in this monitor and can't keep up my mind

  • 37 months ago
  • 1 point

I'm not sure what reviews you've been reading, but I didn't read any before I overclocked my monitor. I just did it on a whim.

I can guarantee that the monitor runs at 84Hz. Not only does Nvidia Control Panel recognize the refresh rate to be 84Hz, every FPS counter I have used stops at 84 FPS when Vsync is on.

Hope this helps. Cheers.

CRS10114

  • 39 months ago
  • 2 points

What games do you play?

And does it get hot?

I have the same build (gets really hot) and I'm curious about your airflow setup

  • 39 months ago
  • 1 point

I play everything from League of Legends to Rise of the Tomb Raider.

You can see my temps in the details, but to summarize: no. At least it doesn't get nearly as hot if the GPU was air-cooled. I have since changed my CPU cooler to a Noctua NH-D15S, and the temps are the same.

I have way too many fans for what is necessary for my computer. Here are a couple pictures of what my computer looks like right now:

http://i.imgur.com/peNbvrx.jpg

http://i.imgur.com/eICksM7.jpg

If you have any other questions, or would like me to clear something up, just let me know.

Cheers, CRS10114

  • 39 months ago
  • 2 points

Thanks for your reply.

Build is looking good man. What motivates you to switch from the h105i? I bought the closed water loop cooler because you had it.

My PC runs unbearably hot (killed me the summer) so I would like to get more info on your airflow. Given that you had multiple builds, I feel like you have a good grasp on what airflow works best for this chassis.

I saw that you recommended the corsair SP 120s to someone so I got 6 of them. https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B007RESFR2/ref=ya_st_dp_summary

I also saw that you have the front 2x140mm setup for intake. Does that build work better than the 200mm?

  • 39 months ago
  • 1 point

I had the H100i GTX on my CPU, and the H105 (no i) is now on my GPU. The H105's radiator is in the front (with a 2x120mm push-pull configuration), and the only 140mm fan I have is the rear one. What kind of temps are you getting for your CPU/GPU?

I notice that you have an almost identical copy to my PC (which I don't mind in the slightest), so I can't imagine that there should be much of a difference in thermal performance.

Your GPU will undoubtedly give off more heat than the CPU. I can't exactly speak for the 960 (because I've never had one), but my 980 Ti ran at about 73°C when it was on air cooling. As you can see now, it runs at 55°C with the water cooler. Something that might affect your system temps is your ambient temperature.

With the first version of Ttammy, I uninstalled the front 200mm fan for the aesthetics of the white LED fans (and quite honestly, I want to go back to nothing but white fans [probably going to get the Corsair ML fans when I have the money]). I should also note that I only had the 200mm fan for about a day because I accidentally broke off a few of the fan blades by sticking my finger in the fan (because I'm smart like that).

Okay, so I just checked out your Completed Builds section, and noticed you had some odd choices in parts. For example, the H97 motherboard. If you never intend on overclocking, then I can kinda understand, otherwise that doesn't make sense to me. The EVGA 750 B2 isn't particularly a bad choice, but for the price, you could've gotten something that's better (like the SeaSonic SSR-550RM). Before you ask, yes, you could totally run your rig (you could even run mine) off of that PSU. The only reason I have such a high wattage PSU is because it's from my very first build, and I didn't know any better, so I went overboard.

Anyway, that's about all I have to say for now. It's 6:11 AM currently, and I haven't slept yet.

Hopefully this helps, and again, feel free to ask me any other questions you might have.

Cheers, CRS10114

  • 39 months ago
  • 2 points

Appreciate you taking the time to check out my build. But I did some upgrading and here's what im running now (6x corsair sp120 fans are arriving tomorrow). http://pcpartpicker.com/user/rlee10/saved/tjFD4D

What do you think?

I get you with the psu being overkill but I felt I needed it, in case I go sli later on. It's just insurance. Plus correct me if I'm wrong but i think the psu only uses power that is required of it, so in our case, we're only partially using our PSU. Regardless, due to the heat issue, I changed from the bronze certified one to a gold certified, since gold is more efficient, thus creating less heat.

I really liked the idea of having two radiators. Awesome how you did that to your gpu, that's my next move. Could you tell me the challenges and what's the best way to do this?

  • 39 months ago
  • 1 point

I actually saw that parts list first, but decided to check your Completed Builds, then saw your technically current build. The new one is definitely close to my own.

A couple of pointers:

  1. If you plan on having SLI in the future, I'd recommend at least an 850W PSU.

  2. If you plan on doing SLI and overclocking in the future, I'd recommend at the very least an 850W PSU (even then, I'd shoot for somewhere around 1000W).

  3. The only reason I would ever pick up a GTX 980 Ti nowadays would be if I got it for like $350 or less. I'd recommend a GTX 1070 or perhaps wait for the flagship AMD cards.

  4. You are right and wrong about the PSU. The PSU only draws the power the system needs, and will be able to draw up to whatever it is rated to draw (like 750W or 850W). BUT, you are very wrong about the efficiency/heat aspect of PSUs. They get hot no matter what their efficiency is. The only thing that efficiency rating guarantee is the efficiency of the power it draws for the system and the longevity of the unit, as in, it won't explode if you turn on your computer and will last longer vs. lower ratings.

Now that I've gotten that out of the way, let's talk about the challenges I've had.

Cable management is tricky in this case.

  • Even with the basement (the thing the motherboard is mounted on that divides the case), it really doesn't have any good way of keeping cables routed, so you'll have to get creative. Especially since it's not a particularly large case, the PSU cables are probably going to be a bit long. I bunch the cables up near the PSU by laying them one on top of the other and folding them somewhat.

Installing the interior fans of the radiator is something you need to do before you actually mount the radiator.

  • This is something I learned the hard way, and still don't do sometimes. The fans that are closest to the inside of the case are incredibly hard to install if you've already mounted the radiator due to the limited space you create for yourself by putting anything in the case.

The thing I used to install the water cooler on my GPU is the Corsair HG10 N980. It's super simple to install, given you follow the instructions properly.

Alternatively, you could go for the NZXT G10 Kraken, which is NZXT's version of AIO GPU watercooling.

You will not be able to install a radiator on the side of the case closest to the GPU.

  • At least, you won't be able to do that and get away with push-pull fans. Only in a push or pull configuration would you be able to do that. I highly recommend doing what I did by sticking the GPU radiator in the front, and the CPU radiator on the side.

Well, that's about all I can think of at the moment.

Sorry for the wall of text, but I just wanted to cover all the points that came to mind.

Cheers, CRS10114

  • 31 months ago
  • 1 point

This is probably a dumb question, but you have your fans plugged directly into your psu, correct? I've been debating on doing that vs finding a way to cram as many onto my mobo as possible without blowing the thing up, exaggerating a little bit.

  • 31 months ago
  • 1 point

Actually, they are plugged into a hub that has eight 3-pin fan headers that is powered by a SATA power connector from the PSU.

  • 31 months ago
  • 1 point

So they are running full blast all the time then? I'm only asking because I am debating whether or not to plug my own fans into the psu or plug what I can to the mobo. I thought if I went the psu route I could use this. https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B007S3T4O0/

Thanks for the reply btw. I appreciate it.

  • 31 months ago
  • 1 point

Well, this is an old version of my system. I only have 3 fans in my system now, and they're controlled by my motherboard.

But to answer your question, yes, they were running at max speed. The only way to control fan speeds is with PWM, and as far as I know, there isn't a way to control the RPM of 3-pin fans (even with a 4-pin PWN fan hub).