Description

After a lot of thorough research and financial saving I finally pulled the trigger on getting all the parts together I wanted to create my first PC build. I wanted a very clean look with some essential hardware features and a Spider-man theme to add some flare and a personal touch.

Since this is my first build though, I’m not quite sure how to start benchmarking it to see how my system performs. If anyone has any tips or advice on how to do this it would be greatly appreciated. I’ll update this build description with my personal reviews on all the hardware I purchased for this build as my testing continues. Thanks in advance to all of you that offer your input.

Parts Performance:

CPU: Intel Core i7-8700K - I currently have this overclocked to 5.0Ghz using the UEFI from Gigabytes Aorus Pro WiFi motherboard. It seems to be running stable with no problems at all. I ran into a couple moments where I think it ran into overheating issues and I had to restart the system, but that may be an issue with either the motherboard or the AIO CPU cooler rather than the CPU itself. I mostly use my system to play games, browse the web, and do some office documents for work and school. All of these programs run on the Intel platform with zero compatibility or optimization issues. Everything runs very smoothly and I think the 8700K can handle everything that I throw at it just fine.

Part Reviews

CPU

An excellent CPU that is easily overclockable and performs very well.

CPU Cooler

I chose this AIO specifically for its aesthetics. It has a great clean look that doesn't show off any flashy branding. It performs very well at keeping CPU temps under control. It comes with some great accessories (two RGB LED strips and a PWM fan hub). I've heard of some leaking issues with other reviews, but I've had zero problems with mine. I will update my review if I ever do.

Motherboard

The build quality and features of this board are top notch and not overly expensive. The ability to overclock using the UEFI seem pretty simple enough, but it could certainly use some tweaks to be less tedious in navigating. The utility software definitely needs some major improvement though. Their App Center doesn't recognize that you have more recently updated software for its own programs and RGB Fusion also definitely could some use major updating and provide more options for RGB control.

Memory

Great looking kit of RAM that seems to perform very well.

Case

One of the best cases ever. Its beautiful, clean, and offers a ton of options. Cable management in this case is a breeze.

Case Fan

Probably the best looking RGB fans out there right now and performs very well for air flow as well. I only wish that they also looked as good on it's rear side in case you decided to use them as intake into your case.

Comments

  • 7 months ago
  • 3 points

Great build I love the spider man theme, I think red and white is the best color match there is :)

Micro Score: (9/10)

+1

  • 7 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks. I appreciate it. I’m really pleased at the way it came out.

  • 7 months ago
  • 2 points

This really is the best case out there right now i think... Great looking build

  • 7 months ago
  • 1 point

I agree. It was super easy to build in and keep everything organized and to manage cables. I have twelve 120mm fans running in this thing plus RGB elements dealing with multiple hubs and PWM fan splitters. Even with all that I didn’t have too much trouble of figuring out where to run cables and keep them out of view to keep a clean look in the main cabin.

  • 7 months ago
  • 2 points

Awesome build! I have a similar set up that I will be posting soon. How do you like the Deepcool AIO? I've read mixed reviews regarding them.

  • 7 months ago
  • 2 points

Thank you. I appreciate it. I'll be looking out for your build.

I like the Captain 360 AIO. I love the aesthetics of it. I picked it specifically because I didn't like all the other AIO's out there that have their text branding on the CPU block. I was cautious of the reviews that I have seen as well about some people experiencing leaks, but those are probably rare cases and Deepcool seems to be taking care of all their customers that are affected. It performs very well for me. I have my 8700K overclocked to 5.0Ghz and with the Deepcool Captain 360 attached my CPU doesn't get hotter than the mid 60's °C while playing games at 1440p and very high settings. I have it set up with 6 fans running in a push-pull configuration exhausting outside the case.

  • 7 months ago
  • 2 points

Can you tell me about how you wired and managed all the fans? I’m looking to do the same set up with 9 rgb fans (for the open side) and 3 normal ones (for the closed side on the AIO rad) but just the thought of all that wiring is scary.

Awesome build and love how much you personalised it!

  • 7 months ago
  • 2 points

The Gigabyte Aorus Pro Wifi motherboard only has 8 PWM fan headers, so I had to use a PWM fan hub and two fan head splitters to connect them all. The case has more than enough well placed cutouts and rubber grommets in order to channel all the necessary cables neatly and keep them hidden.

The Deepcool Captain 360 comes with a fan hub to connect the three included 120mm fans plus another PWM fan header (four PWM fan headers in total on that included hub. So, I used that to connect to one of the CPU PWM fan hubs on the motherboard. The Corsair LL120 three fan kit also comes with a hub to connect all the RGB control cables, but it does not come with a PWM fan hub. So, with the included fan hub for the 360 radiator plus the Corsair fans it took up four total PWM fan headers. That left me with four PWM fan headers left for my 6 remaining Noctua fans. So, I bought two PWM fan splitter cables which allowed me to connect two fans to one header (the two fans connected to the splitter both run at the same speed together). This setup had me using all eight PWM fan header's running 12 fans plus the AIO pump.

I know it all sounds pretty complicated. It took me quite a bit of time trying to figure it out myself. I probably could've made it all a bit simpler for myself had I bought something like the Corsair Commander Pro, but that thing is pretty expensive. Hardware Canucks explained it a bit in this video.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KU6vIDpNaxw&t=465s

If you plan on using 9 total RGB fans then you'll probably greatly benefit from using the commander pro instead of having to deal with multiple hubs. It'll make things a bit simpler but it still requires a lot wires. I would recommend on organizing and cable managing all of those smaller wires first before you start running your power supply cables so that you can hide them behind the thicker cables to make it look neat. I wish you the best of luck with that setup. I'm sure its going to take a lot of work.

  • 7 months ago
  • 2 points

Thank you so much. I searched everywhere on google and on YouTube but did not find a single useful answer but this reply answered all my questions.

  • 7 months ago
  • 2 points

It’s my pleasure. I’m glad that I could help

  • 7 months ago
  • 1 point

Last question: I recently saw a video on pmw fan headers and it said header provides certain amount of power and each brand of fan takes up a certain amount. Does a fan hub plug into to the motherboard for power or the psu because i say a 10 fan pmw fan hub but for 1 header that is obviously too much power draw? (and if it plugs into a psu, is there a seperate wire that goes into the motherboard for fan rpm control?)

  • 7 months ago
  • 1 point

That will depend on the fan hub and how many PWM headers that fan hub supports. The PWM fan hub that I have supports 4 fans (PWM) and that hub attaches to a single PWM fan header on my motherboard, so it draws power directly from the motherboard. There are some fan hubs that support quite a bit more fans and they have SATA connections to receive power from the PSU via a SATA connector from the PSU. Those types of hubs will probably also have a USB 2.0 connector so that fan speed control and maybe lighting can be controlled through software.

You also have the option of using PWM fan splitters to allow you to attach either 2 or 3 fans per header. The only drawback from that option is that all of those fans connected to that PWM header will run at the same speed.

Your configuration will vary depending on your motherboard and the amount of fans that you want to run and the types of fans that you have.

  • 7 months ago
  • 2 points

I like how you did the Spider-Man emblems, helps with the cohesion.

With that many fans, what RPM do they all spin at?

  • 7 months ago
  • 2 points

Thanks. I think the the stickers came out great too. I'm pretty happy with them.

The Noctua fans have a range of 450-1700 RPM and the Corsair LL120 fans have a range of 600-1500 RPM. At idle they are all pretty quiet. At load they are certainly noticeable but the pitch/frequency of the fan noise is not bothersome at all and honestly I don't really notice them when I'm gaming.

[comment deleted by staff]