Description

UPDATE: Added new pictures

I've been using a gaming laptop for about 5 years and after the two-year mark is when it began to slow down and become outdated. I wanted to get this computer in the summer of 2015, but I ended up not getting enough money. I finally was able to pay for it and built it on Christmas Eve. I'm mainly using this for gaming and watching movies. The build surprisingly ended up working out very smoothly. Didn't run into any problems although I do wish I had gotten a better toolkit because I ended up dropping a few screws behind the mobo quite frequently.

SPECS

Intel Core i5-4690k: Very responsive and fast CPU. I will be overclocking soon once I get an aftermarker cooler. There is one problem I had with this CPU: THE DAMNED STOCK COOLER. The stock cooler is terrible, I ended up putting it on wrong the first time (don't ask why) and I'm pretty sure I screwed the placement on the pre-applied thermal paste. I have ordered a new cooler that will be more reliable and will have room for overclocking.

MSI Z97A GAMING 6: Very good looking board, I love the color scheme on it and it will fit well with what I have planned for upgrades.

Kingston HyperX Fury 8GB 1600MHz: Not sure how to criticize RAM... I mean the heat spreaders are pretty cool lookin'.

Mushkin ECO2 120GB: Not currently using as my boot drive because I messed up on the OS installation because I accidentally used the 32-bit install instead of the 64-bit. Didn't let me install the new OS install on the SSD so I just did it on the hard drive. I am planning on switching that soon though, other than that it is a good SSD. Not amazing but it came with the deal.

Seagate Barracude 1TB: It's a hard drive.

Gigabyte Radeon R9 380 2GB: Great card, I almost ended up going with the GTX 960 as I am an Nvidia fanboy (sorry). But I'm actually glad I went with this one considering it tends to perform better than the GTX 960. No problems so far, definitely one hell of an upgrade from 2010 Laptop GPU.

NZXT S340: I love the sleek black design on this case. Real good airflow. Only problems are the incredibly difficult drive cages for the hard drives and the easy scratch/smudge glossy side panels.

Rosewill ARC 650W: Nothing bad to really say about this PSU except that it's not modular in any way so it's a bit difficult to route the cables through the case. Definitely will do for now and will last long enough for me.

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Comments

  • 49 months ago
  • 4 points

So what monitor is that?

  • 49 months ago
  • 4 points

I don't know what it is, but it looks like it costs more than the computer.

  • 49 months ago
  • 4 points

^ This lmao

  • 49 months ago
  • 4 points

It is a curved 29" Samsung ultrawide 2560 X 1080 monitor

  • 49 months ago
  • 1 point

true

  • 49 months ago
  • 4 points

Good gracious that is a wide monitor.

  • 49 months ago
  • 1 point

It's the baby brother to my monitor, if you can call a 29" monitor a baby. :-p

  • 49 months ago
  • 3 points

I juste have one question if you guys can answer me: why do people use a water cooling system for cpu cooler. I don't want to bash anyone about this but why? Is it better than a simple fan? I don't have any overclocking projects but I want an i5 4690k and i put a simple 30$ fan (Canadian Dollar) on my system build. Is it good enough or should I go for a water cooling stuff?

  • 49 months ago
  • 2 points

Some people just like to know how far their systems can be pushed or run CPU intensive tasks for long periods like in video editing (an overclocked CPU will complete the task much faster). For this you need to keep temps down and liquid cooling is more efficient. Although you can get air coolers like the Noctua NH D14/15 that allow you to push a CPU to its limit, they are heavy, big in size and can put stress/strain on the motherboard. So using a CPU water-block saves space on the motherboard and much lighter than aircoolers.

If you don't wish to overclock the stock cooler will be just fine, keeping the temps of your CPU within specs although you need a case with good airflow. If you want to lower temps then an aftermarket cooler with a bigger heatsink than the stock cooler will do fine. Their are several out there.

  • 49 months ago
  • 1 point

I don't know much about computers just yet im fairly new to computers and the components but water cooling gpu can help the rpm and fans usually can slow down over time since it can bring in dust bust the water cooling system can also since you need fans to help cool the water down from what i hear and know using water cooling systems is much better but i still use fans since i don't know how to hook up the systems yet it doesnt look that complicated.

  • 49 months ago
  • 2 points

Yeah but I don't plan to overclock anything cause it doesn't need to. Checked and this build runs Fallout 4 and Star Wars Battlefront without any problem so I don't see why I should overclock yet but for my needs, I don't think I should bother go for a water cooling system.

  • 49 months ago
  • 1 point

You should totally go for what you want man! I just want to overclock, but you totally don't need to. You'll be just fine with like a $20 fan cooler like the 212 Evo, which is a great cooler for the price.

  • 49 months ago
  • 2 points

Yeah I don't want to overlock XD don't want to break anything or even mess it up. By the way, you should try to build a pc with only a 100$ Canadian...it's freakin hard

  • 49 months ago
  • 1 point

With that much cash, you basically have to hack together old server stuff to get it to work.

You may be surprised how much enterprise stuff declines in cost when its not top-end anymore lol

  • 49 months ago
  • 1 point

Only problems with coolent systems is they can leak but they are more powerful and sometimes better for your system from what i hear so dont take my word for it

  • 49 months ago
  • 1 point

Water cooling seems a better option for builders who plan on overclocking and who's activities will result with a higher heat output, water cooling definitely keeps temperatures lower than most air coolers. Air coolers are also a cheaper option and can also be used for OC'ing and can handle hot temperatures, but people who want to make sure their temperatures are very low and want to make sure they have a safe overclock with no heating problems often opt for water cooling. I'm sure the cooler you bought for your 4690K could handle overclocking.

  • 49 months ago
  • 1 point

a 1600 dollar budget build?

  • 49 months ago
  • 2 points

It was $750 without the peripherals.

  • 49 months ago
  • 0 points

I bet it was. I bet it was.

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  • 49 months ago
  • 1 point

Make sure your heatsink doesn't fall off. Like mine did. :(

  • 45 months ago
  • 1 point

So how does this monitor work on the 2gb GPU? I'm looking at getting the same monitor but my friend said even the 970 wont be enough to run games at max settings on that monitor.

  • 45 months ago
  • 1 point

A 970 will do just fine, but I'd would much rather go the R9 390 considering it's newer and it will last you longer.

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