Description

My second build. My first one got me hooked. I'll probably build a few more fun little computers in the future. It took my parents a bit of convincing to let me do this because I'm a 16y/o. I have a job and stuff, but they don't want me to waste money or anything (I plan to perhaps sell this computer for around $750 or so).

The temps may or may not be completely accurate. I've heard that the chip series the fx-6300 belongs to has a faulty temp pin or whatever. Or perhaps the thermal paste needs a bit of time to settle in. I may go back and reapply thermal paste if the temperatures persist, although there should have been enough on it right now.

I ran prime95 on it for a bit over an hour and it stayed steady at 54C, so I consider that to be pretty good. I didn't really have the time to do a full 24-hour test.

Parts choices are because:

CPU It's cheap and powerful, for the price tag. It's a good decision to go with.

heatsink Highly rated, cheap, and I have experience with it.

Mobo It was a bit cheaper when I got it, and it has decent ratings. There is a slight problem with it though. The BIOS/Control Center thing start the fans at 100% speed and when I make and save changes, it sets the fan speeds back to default when I reboot. Slightly annoying, so I downloaded SpeedFan to control fan speeds through that, and it worked, but wouldn't boot up on start even when I placed it in the startup folder found in an AppData folder chain and change the settings in MSCONFIG to let it start when I boot up the computer. I'll eventually get the problem solved, though. EDIT I got a response from the MSI customer support. Apparently this is the way that the Control Center program is supposed to work. Well, that's mildly frustrating, but I guess I'll deal with it, unless somebody else has a solution.

RAM I was going to get Ripjaw series RAM because it was on sale for really cheap, but it was out of stock, so I went with Ballistix instead. Can't say I regret the decision.

HDD 7200 rpm, 64mb cache, 6gbps, 1tb. It does everything I need it to with plenty of space.

Videocard I got it for around $149 on sale, I think. It does everything I need it to. I'll get around to testing it on games soon, but I'm sorta jealous of this for-fun build I did because the gpu on my main computer is only a 7850 that I bought for $189, haha. How times change...

Case I have the nonelite version of this case in black. It's good and cheap, definitely good for budget builds. Looks pretty decent to boot, in my opinion.

PSU Semi-modular is as much modular as I really needed, although getting a fully modular would have been fun. It has enough power to power the system as well as overclocking if wanted. It's also rated well. The flat cables look pretty sexy. Not the best for cable management though. They were stiff, but otherwise pleasing to work with.

Optical Drive It's an optical drive. You use it to download the OS and various drivers, then you ignore it for the rest of the computer's life. There are a few games that I would still play that I have on disk though. Namely Civ III and Rollercoaster Tycoon 3 gold.

OS W7. I would have gone with W8, because I've heard that it's slightly, although not very much, faster. Like a few ms faster.

The build itself was pretty fun. In the second picture the nervous parts are undergoing the rite of the case. After they passed, I put them in. They were really excited. I managed to get almost every single cable behind the case or underneath the motherboard so that they'd still be out of the way. The one exception is that one fan cable you can see in the fifth picture. Luckily it's small, and out of the way. It's the cable to one of the original case fans, so it came with two molex adapters connected to it. I managed to use a twist-tie to attach them to one of the unused expansion slot grates, otherwise the adapters would be sitting on the videocard. And in the last picture you can see a very ecstatic computer turning on for the first time :)

The final cost of the build come out to $753.59

If you have any comments or questions, feel free to post! I'll try to respond quickly, or to update information as needed

What annoys me is now I have a box of computer parts I don't need because they're the excess, and I never know what to do with them.

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Comments

  • 73 months ago
  • 1 point

i usually keep the motherboard box, keep all the driver discs, manuals, etc from the other boxes in there, and toss the other boxes.

edit: a tip for ya, place your hard drive on the bottom most slot. less travel for the cable, no hindrance for the video card and CPU's airflow, and a lot cleaner in general. and zip-tying your wires here and there wont be too much of a pain. it'll be rewarding too~

  • 68 months ago
  • 1 point

WHAT DISPLAY IS THAT. I NEED TO know, IT LOOKS SWEET

  • 68 months ago
  • 1 point

An HP w2338h. It's a great display. It's old though, no longer on the market. I bought it off craigslist over a year ago, and it still works like a charm.

  • 68 months ago
  • 1 point

that looks so much like an apple display that i want it. you sure no amazon.

  • 68 months ago
  • 1 point

Yeah, that's the one. Like I said before it is older so personally I would say that if you're looking to get a new monitor, I would just buy something like this Asus monitor.

  • 68 months ago
  • 1 point

its like 300 bucks but it looks so different

  • 68 months ago
  • 1 point

this one looks sweet too. should i get this one http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00B332A24/ref=olp_product_details?ie=UTF8&me= it just looks good

  • 64 months ago
  • 1 point

How did you get the cooler backplate onto the motherboard?

  • 64 months ago
  • 1 point

Just by removing the existing backplate, putting the four heatsink mount screws into the holes, dropping the backplate onto the exposed screws on the back and securing it with the included nuts. It's a bit difficult because I was constantly turning the motherboard over, so it would have been easier for me to mount the motherboard in the case so that the motherboard would be vertical and held in place while I was lining up the backplate with the screws.

  • 64 months ago
  • 1 point

And how did you remove the existing backplate?

  • 64 months ago
  • 1 point

Well, uh, with a screw driver. I mean, it's really obvious how to remove the existing backplate, since the screws are on the front of the motherboard, and you just unscrew those, the existing backplate should just fall off.

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  • 64 months ago
  • 1 point

The Screws that were meant to hold the stock fan, hold the original back plate? (The one that comes with CPU traditionally)

  • 64 months ago
  • 1 point

Yep, pretty much.

  • 64 months ago
  • 1 point

Did you try the test build method, or put everything together in one hit? Also, did your CPU come in mint condition?

  • 64 months ago
  • 1 point

Put the computer together ontop of the motherboard box and turned it on to make sure everything worked, then put it all into the case. I'd say the CPU was in pretty decent condition, though I can't be 100% certain.