Description

My main personal rig. Many of these parts have quite a long history with me, most notably the SSD. I had all of the parts in late July of 2015, minus the last 16GB of RAM, and grabbed that when I did the Tempered Glass side panel mod in mid-May of this year. The H105 and S340 are flagged as incompatible, and this is not by mistake. However, with enough brute force, it is certainly possible, if not terribly pleasant on one's hands.

Two of the NF-F12 iPPC 2000 fans are used on the the radiator, and the remaining one is rear exhaust, while the A14 is top exhaust. The rear is controlled by the motherboard based on CPU temp, while the top is set up in SpeedFan as being GPU-controlled. Neither of the exhaust fans spin at idle. The rear kicks in with the CPU at 50 C and the top when the GPU hits 60 C. The radiator fans are configured with ASRock's "Silent" profile, and spin at around 800 RPM at idle, making their noise output to my liking. It was not my original intent to have two exhaust fans, but in any other configuration, the system was incredibly noisy. As it is now, the system is almost completely silent on idle, and very reasonable under load. Having the GPU-controlled fan seemed to bring the GPU's temperature down a good 10 degrees C, enabling two more boost states.

Currently, the CPU runs at 4.7 GHz at 1.31 volts, with cache at 45 multiplier. Four 8GB DIMMs of 2400MHz DDR3 is certainly asking for a lot at that CPU speed, and indeed is not quite stable. Lowering the speed to 2200MHz resolves any problems, however. The most I seem to be able to get out of the GPU is around 1370 MHz under load, with the VRAM at 8GHz effective. Somewhat disappointing to be sure, and I believe it is due to the card not wanting to increase its voltage the way it should, but I can only be so upset seeing as performance on my 1440p60 monitor is certainly more than adequate with these settings.

The Glass side panel mod was inspired greatly by Paul's Hardware, (I even went for the same glass vendor) and was actually quite fun despite the challenge. I did it because an error I previously made with a tower cooler in this case caused the acrylic window to be scratched. I figured that if I was going to bother to replace it, I might as well do something special. The S340 obviously already has a cut-out for a window, but it is recessed and the window is held in with metal tabs that come off of the case. I intended to Dremel off the metal tabs, but instead bent them off by hard and used the Dremel to sand down the remainder. To mount the panel past the recess, three layers of the 3M mounting tape are stacked on one another, giving me just more height than the metal recess, allowing adhesive to make good contact with both glass and steel. I was skeptical during this process, but with it done, the strength of the 3M tape is incredibly impressive. The wonderfully bright CableMod Widebeam LEDs behind the smoked tempered glass is truly a sight to behold. The smoked window prevents a lot of light from leaking in from the outside and the brighter LEDs compensate from the inside. This, combined with the gorgeous reflections on the glass all combine for a build that looks beautiful in both the daytime and at night.

With all that work done, AVARICE is, for me, the accomplishment of a goal that I have been chasing for a long time. I began building computers at age 11, and I turn 19 in less than two months. With each build I've done, despite whatever performance was had, there was always something that made it seem inadequate. This build, however, has brought me far closer to the nagging image in my head of a perfect PC than I ever dreamed I'd be. It is something that I can be truly proud to look at on my desk.

Comments

  • 38 months ago
  • 1 point

That keyboard looks like you grabbed it from an antique store lol

  • 38 months ago
  • 7 points

But typing on it feels like my fingers are being guided along a spiritual journey

  • 38 months ago
  • 1 point

Is that the famous keyboard that Wendell at Tek Syndicate raves about? I hear that's one of the best keyboards ever made.I always forget the name.

  • 38 months ago
  • 3 points

The "famous" keyboard in question is the IBM Model M, a design from the 80s. The design and tooling was sold by IBM to Lexmark, and now a company named Unicomp is the manufacturer. Though the Unicomp-made ones like mine lack the steel backplate, the switch design is preserved.

  • 38 months ago
  • 2 points

Oh yeah, my dad has one of those too and he swears by it. The best part is he could use it as a weapon if someone should break into the house.

  • 38 months ago
  • 1 point

Yup that's the one! Thanks for the response.

  • 38 months ago
  • 1 point

Nice build. Good attention to detail internally. Well done +1

  • 38 months ago
  • 1 point

That keyboard though!

  • 38 months ago
  • 1 point

Does that LED strip light up the insides enough? I'm having trouble imagining the lighting in person. It seems too dim, or not well-balanced (e.g. doesn't the left side also need similar lighting?)

(Nice build, by the way. +1)

  • 38 months ago
  • 1 point

It looks far more even in person than it does in the photos. The area under the GPU is somewhat dim, otherwise it spreads out rather nicely. My old BitFenix LEDs weren't bright enough for the lighting to be even, but the new CableMod ones do a much better job.

  • 35 months ago
  • 1 point

What size glass panel should i buy?

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  • 38 months ago
  • 1 point

For sure. Definitely amused to think I spent quite a bit more on just the glass window than the rest of the case.

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