Description

It is surreal and unsettling to watch your fanless, passively cooled, completely silent build go through a bench test like Time Spy. You're thinking about the temps and...

Shhh!

Sorry, I was just...

!!!

Edit: I should note that the card doesn't fit in the DB4 case without cutting a groove into one of the bottom cross-beams. The board is about 3 or 4 mm too tall. It's a pretty simple alteration to make, though.

Comments

  • 8 months ago
  • 2 points

Nice, this is really cool. Never knew there were companies making this kinda stuff.

  • 8 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks! Hopefully PCPP will add it to their database. They have a couple of other Streacom cases, but I really enjoyed putting together this one.

  • 8 months ago
  • 2 points

Dude, you gotta provide those temps!!! Also, badass build, dude. This case is so interesting and you have taken on the experiment. Good for you.

Edit: never mind, I see temps. So, low 80s...not bad at all.

  • 8 months ago
  • 1 point

Thank you! They don't recommend putting anything that draws more power than a 1050ti, but I thought it could work if you didn't pack the case with storage.

  • 8 months ago
  • 2 points

Do you drop frames and frequency during long play sessions or workloads?

  • 8 months ago
  • 1 point

That remains to be seen. I've only run it through the basic benchmarks. To be honest, I'm a bit relieved to have made it this far without damaging anything. I'll update when I've used it a bit more. If necessary, I'll modify the bottom of the case to add an exhaust fan that kicks in at high temps, but I'm hoping that won't be necessary.

  • 8 months ago
  • 2 points

That case looks like the "Lab building" from the movie Ant man and the Wasp lol

  • 8 months ago
  • 1 point

Awesome! I have a portable lab. I'll just install some wheels. Actually, since it weighs 25 lbs, that's a pretty good idea.

  • 8 months ago
  • 1 point

you should totally do that!

  • 8 months ago
  • 1 point

Amazing aesthetic. Awesome build.

  • 8 months ago
  • 2 points

Thanks! I love the cube. It looks like art to me.

  • 8 months ago
  • 1 point

Really cool build. I remember watching the Hardware Canucks review of this case a few years back and was really impressed. I've been fascinated by completely fanless computing ever since I saw the Zalman TNN 300 and TNN 500AF years back.

Your CPU core and GPU core temps seem to be under control. The only thing I would be concerned about are the temps on the motherboard's VRM, GPU's VRM, and GPU's memory. Is there any way to determine how hot they are getting under 3D load? Maybe using a FLIR camera with the top of the case removed?

  • 8 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks. That's a great idea. I'm concerned, as you can tell from the number of heat sinks I put on the on gpu board. I think I'll get the camera and give that a shot before I press the system any harder.

  • 8 months ago
  • 1 point

Yeah, the heatsinks can help, but the amount of heat that they can passively dissipate is limited compared to if they had direct airflow.

I only make this point because I once tried running an AMD chip with a fanless heatsink along with an Nvidia 8800GT with a fanless Thermalright HR-03 heatsink. It worked for a day or two, but then the GPU died :(

If you note that components in the system get too warm under sustained load then you might be able to have the system control the speed of a quiet fan using a temperature probe attached to that component.

  • 8 months ago
  • 1 point

I was about to give up on the passively cooled gpu, but that's just not me. I'll find another solution to make it work. It may be a fan, but it would be a case fan and only as a last resort.

  • 8 months ago
  • 1 point

You could have a large slow fan turn on only when the GPU core reaches a certain temperature. At one point, I used something like this to control my system fans based on GPU temperatures with MSI Afterburner

http://www.performance-pcs.com/4-pin-pwm-fan-connector-male-to-4-pin-mini-gpu-fan-connector-female.html

  • 8 months ago
  • 1 point

I've been experimenting with exactly that. I put a Noctua A15 over the top. It didn't help much at all with the high temps. I've discovered that the card needs fairly strong direct airflow. I'm thinking of creating an air duct out of acrylic for a roof fan to exhaust the air directly from the gpu and its vrms. I've found temps stabilize in the upper 70s with direct airflow running Heaven at high for an extended period.

Thanks for the recommendation on Afterburner. I think using that in conjunction with the direct airflow may do the trick. Hopefully the app is really responsive, because this system is incredibly sensitive to ambient temps, as you can imagine.

[comment deleted]
  • 8 months ago
  • 1 point

Thought I'd never see this case again, instant +1

  • 8 months ago
  • 1 point

Thank you! The workmanship and flexibility of this case are astonishingly good. Even the packaging is awesome. In fact, I thought about including the unboxing pics. Of course, it weighs 25 lbs fully assembled!

  • 8 months ago
  • 1 point

Is it REALLY cool, or is it just basically an Intel stock cooler. xD

It looks really nice. +1

  • 8 months ago
  • 1 point

There’s a little shopping center near me called Trianle Square. That’s what comes to mind when I hear the phrase Intel Cooler.

Thanks for the +1!

  • 8 months ago
  • 1 point

That's "Triangle Square"

  • 8 months ago
  • 1 point

This is just aesthetically pleasing to look at! Very clean and simple. Great job +1

  • 8 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks! When I was finished installing the components, I kept thinking I must be forgetting something because it's so simple.

  • 8 months ago
  • 1 point

Nailed it man. Gorgeous build.

  • 8 months ago
  • 1 point

Looks really good. What game is that? I thought it was Prey but that seems wrong. Mind pointing me in the right direction?

  • 8 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks! It's actually the gaming system bench mark video by 3D Mark. As far as I know, no one has developed a game for it. Actually, some one should do that, since people that bench mark a lot are so familiar with it.

  • 8 months ago
  • 1 point

Forgot the name of the bench mark is Time Spy. 3D Mark makes a number of different benchmarks.

  • 8 months ago
  • 1 point

Now try to build the fastest gaming pc, but in a pavilion.

  • 8 months ago
  • 1 point

Been there, done that. I think it's time to slow down.

  • 4 months ago
  • 1 point

hey, I'm considering a build similar to this and I'd like to know how it turned out long-term. You said you were considering experimenting with cutting out vents & adding a cooling fan.. did anything ever come of that? Would you be similarly worried about gpu temps if you used a cooler card like a gtx 1660 ti? (and yeah, I'm aware the manufacturer recommends 65-75w tdp lol)

regardless, this is a sweet looking build :)

  • 4 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks! I decided that putting fans in was not in the spirit of things, so I started downgrading cards to solve the thermal throttling issue. The RTX 2060 was definitely too much for it, and so I put a gtx 1050 in it, and it ran that with no problems. Then, the gtx 1650 came out and, while for the most part a useless, overpriced tweener card, it is perfect for this build. That said, it's never going to be great for high setting demanding gaming sessions. It started thermally throttling after an hour of running Heaven. I haven't tried the 1660 or 1660 ti, but I'm getting power throttling before thermal throttling and they don't make passively cooled SFX power supplies with more wattage than this one, that I could find anyway. Best of luck! I'd be happy to answer any other questions you have.

  • 4 months ago
  • 1 point

by power throttling, you mean the power supply was getting too hot and throttling itself? i can't imagine 450W isn't enough to run the system normally.

  • 4 months ago
  • 1 point

I was talking about the GPU-Z card performance cap reasons. Now that I look it up, I realize that just means the card itself has hit its power consumption limit. Thanks for that. It makes me feel better about the setup in general. So the card is frequently maxing out on power at least 30 minutes before it starts to throttle thermally.

  • 4 months ago
  • 1 point

I should have put that together before, since the card is drawing power from the PCIe Bus.

  • 4 months ago
  • 1 point

Outstanding build! This case is beautiful.

As for the GPU, I was planning to make a very similar build but I wanted an RTX 2060 and just like you fitting fans to solve the GPU thermal problem wasn't my thing. Since a single panel wasn't enough to cool the RTX I am about to give up on fully passive. A few months ago I found this thread (https://hardforum.com/threads/custom-db4-build.1931503/) from a guy that managed to fit an 8 heat pipe CPU and GPU heatsink and cool the GPU with two of the DB4 panels. His GPU is a GTX 1050ti so temps are much lower. But maybe that GPU heatsink from HDPlex and the two panels could be enough to cool an RTX 2060 without thermal throttling.

Any thoughts?

  • 4 months ago
  • 2 points

Thanks! I was inspired to buy a couple of Mac G4 Cubes because of the case. That Mac was way ahead of its time.

Since I'm using the Silverstone power supply, I would try a different method first. In retrospect, temps have never been an issue with the PS, I think because it is not being taxed very heavily. And, the way I installed it, it is not in contact with the wall. I would use some standoff screws to move it closer to the center. That would free up that wall for the GPU. Then, I'd modify the GPU cooling to be 2 walls, similar to the CPU setup, using the free wall. You wouldn't have to change the CPU setup at all. It is extremely effective as is. I just think the back wall is underutilized, as long as you aren't working your PS too hard.

In the end, though, the limiting factor is probably time. If you're the type that likes to play graphics intensive games for hours on end, I suspect performance will degrade unacceptably as the cube gets saturated with too much heat to dissipate after an hour or so. But who knows till you try, right? I'd love to know the results of that. The GTX 1650 is a card that never should have been made, and I hated having to buy one.

  • 4 months ago
  • 2 points

I should have started with, that guys mod work is awesome. I just mean, the way I was thinking of it seemed simpler to implement. It looks like a lot of fun to do. Maybe rig up a test of my idea to see how the PS holds up. If it does well, you could get even better results by doing a combination of the two!

  • 4 months ago
  • 1 point

I didn't expect the GTX 1650 to thermal throttle so soon. It has the same TDP as the 1050ti and those usually work fine with this case, at least from what I've heard.

I would go his way, simply because I save a few bucks by going with a Corsair SF450 instead of the already fanless Silverstone nightjar and cool the PS with one of the panels. Since I don't intend to overclock, one panel is enough for the CPU so moving the CPU block to the side panel frees the other two for the GPU. Streacom says one panel cools 65 W and two panels can cool up to 110 W. An RTX is way out of these boundaries but it's enough for a 1650 with 75 W TDP. I want something slightly more powerful so maybe I'll go with a GTX 1660 or 1660 Ti and give it a try. Those have a TDP of 120 W.

  • 4 months ago
  • 1 point

It's possible the 1650 is running hotter because of the power throttling caused by the PCIe bus. Please let me know how it goes with the 1660. Without the power limitation, it will probably run more efficiently and hopefully cooler. I'd definitely like to get rid of that 1650.

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

Very cool project man.

Did anyone get around to trying the 1660 or 1660 Ti with this case?

With the GTX 1650 receiving quite bad reviews, the rumoured GTX 1650 Ti and Navi 14/RX5600 not existing yet, I am tempted to try a GTX 1660 Ti (120w).

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks! I never heard back from the guy that was talking about doing it. It’s definitely over the recommended limit from the Streacom experts, but it’s still possible you could make it work with some tinkering. I’m still very curious about how it would work. The extra power from an 8 pin connection to the power supply may be enough to stabilize temps, but I have since had to give up the PC, so I can’t help you with any tests.

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks for the tip

I'm thinking about using an amd 3600 and M.2 storage (to use less space).

How long could you game with the 175w gtx 2070 before the case was saturated with heat?

How did you attach the psu here? (guessing it would appreciate cooling from one wall)

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

Forgot to answer the question about the PSU. The attachment brackets used for the heat transfer plates will screw into anything with various screw sizes. Streacom sells a PSU that attaches to the wall and leaves space for drives, since this case was really intended be a high end HTPC. Their PSU didn't have enough power for an RTX 2070, so that's why I got the Silverstone. I really don't think the PSU was ever contributing much to the thermal issues, or at least the card was such an issue that I never noticed. With the 1650 in there, it will never be an issue because it doesn't draw enough power to make the Silverstone break a sweat.

About the GTX 1650, it's not so much that it's a crappy card as that there is almost no situation where it doesn't make more sense to buy something else for a better price and performance. This is actually the one use case I can think of where the card makes sense.

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks.

So you attached the psu using those two brackets on the right wall? (in picture 6)

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

Yes. They include those brackets with the case and the kits. They're really versatile for attaching just about anything.

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

Just finished my build. Same as you but with the following differences: Ryzen 5 3600 CPU (65W). Corsair DDR4-3600. Geforce GTX 1650

Notes to anyone else attempting this build: The Ryzen 3600 goes crazy hot! Hitting 70-75 degrees idling. The side wall of the cabinet is also very hot, so it's not a problem with heat transfer (although paste is reported to be better than the included pads). There are a lot of people reporting temp issues with the new Ryzen and there are some good tips out there on lowering idle temp. I ordered the LH6 kit now, since the CPU need to handle load and hot summer days :) Also, it feels a waste not to use more cabinet walls for cooling (my only complaint about this case is that the walls seem to transfer almost no heat in-between themselves). The DDR-3600 gets quite warm as there is no airflow.. Not sure if I need to worry about that. The Geforce 1650 is running very cool so far. I'm pretty sure the 1660 ti would have worked!

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

You should definitely get a lot of thermal paste and generously coat the copper tubing where it runs through the contact plates against the walls. Even the Streacom support people I talked to admitted it was superior to their pads. The LH6 kit is a requirement if you’re running a high end/high power chip. The system is really intended to be an HTPC, not a gaming system, so you need to take advantage of every cooling possibility. The 1650 runs well thermally because it is power throttled by only taking power from the PCIe bus. The 1660 ti would draw a lot more power and you would get thermal throttling. The only question is if it would be bad enough that the card’s increased performance potential is negated. The power supply itself could start adding to the thermal issue. The case heat builds up over time, so you could start heating up the CPU, starting a vicious circle by heating up the GPU more, etc. What power supply did you use? As I recall the Streacom PS was underpowered. That could also be adding to thermal issues because the PS would be working harder.

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

I bought the 160w Streacom PSU (since I was planning on using the Ryzen 3400g with integrated graphics), but ended up installing the Nightjar (some money went out the window there :/). I heard the Streacom 240w has ripple issues and it seemed risky to have it serve both a 65w CPU and 75w GPU.

Tons of paste is probably best, but it will smear out on the cabinet walls, so I was hoping to avoid it. It's pretty tight inside the cabinet, so I've ended up removing the walls quite often. For anyone interested in how to lower the idling power usage on Ryzen 3000 CPUs, see here: https://forums.tomshardware.com/threads/ryzen-5-3600-high-idle-temps.3504617/ and here: https://community.amd.com/thread/241662

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

Congratulations, by the way. Are you going to post it here? I'd love to see it!

  • 1 month ago
  • 2 points

Thanks! I'll get the LH6 in and then post it. I guess I owe you that for the inspiration and all the help :)