Description

I'm finally considering this a complete build. This is basically an upgrade that spans 3 years in which I swapped out the PSU, CPU, motherboard, memory, and video card from a custom build that I purchased many years ago from a friend. I finally purchased an ssd, and moved the whole works into my shiny new Fractal Design R5. This is also my first go at some more polished cabling.

I added a third fan to the bottom middle of the case, right next to the power supply and under the video card. All three fans are connected to the case fan controller set at the medium setting. I've removed all the storage and optical drive cases which I read somewhere would aid in efficient cooling. Would it be advisable to move the bottom fan toward the front of the case or is good that it's blowing up against the video card?

As a casual enthusiast I've only just scratched the surface of custom building but I've had a lot fun with this one and learned a lot. The machine works great but I'm also not really a power user so I haven't tested its limits by any means. I welcome any feedback and suggestions. What are some good ways to test the performance of my build?

Comments

  • 42 months ago
  • 5 points

How'd you get the GPU to run without a power cable? :P

  • 41 months ago
  • 1 point

Lol! I didn't notice that until I tried starting up. I got a very stern message to plug in the GPU or else.

  • 42 months ago
  • 2 points

I would definitely move that bottom fan to the front. That way you have two fans pulling air directly into the case. I would suggest getting another on the top to aid in pulling the hot air out. If you have two fans bringing air in, you should have at least two fans drawing air out. With the two fans being in the front of the case, there is also the added benefit of the inflow being consistent in its direction and not hitting each other at a 90 degree angle.

  • 42 months ago
  • 2 points

Lots of debate on fan orientation. A popular strategy is the opposite, with more intake than exhaust, creating positive pressure in the case. I don't know that it's more efficient cooling-wise, but it does help prevent all the nooks, crannies and grilles from becoming dust catchers.

  • 41 months ago
  • 1 point

Like 80-wattHamster already mentioned, I read that keeping positive pressure in the case was good to keep dust out. I like your suggestion of moving the bottom fan to the front. I hadn't even considered that. I didn't really like the bottom fan blowing air up against the gpu fans blowing hot air back. I don't really know if that's an issue or not, but something about having that fan at the front of the case just sits better with me.

  • 41 months ago
  • 1 point

There's is certainly debate but don't buy into it. People still insist on claiming "positive air pressure" using computer fans, which don't have enough static pressure to overcome normal air pressure even under lab conditions, much less a case full of mesh. You simply aren't going to create that sort of pressure using case fans.

  • 41 months ago
  • 1 point

So do you also suggest adding a second exhaust fan? I don't think I'll have any problems with overheating with the three fans I have right now.

  • 41 months ago
  • 1 point

Two is always a good idea. Take a look at your temps during idle and peak usage and go from there.

  • 42 months ago
  • 2 points

In terms of fan placement, each situation is different. So only testing using something like OCCT PSU mode will tell you what works best. Do it once with current setup and record max temps of GPU and CPU. Then move to front and test again and compare. One thing to not when mounting fans on the bottom is that most cases do not have enough elevation to supply the fan with enough air to match it's CFM. Removing the PCIe slot covers allows hot GPU blower air to get out and allow more outflow instead of air blow.

  • 41 months ago
  • 1 point

Awesome! Exactly what I needed. I'll definitely give that a shot.

  • 41 months ago
  • 1 point

Here is OCCT link: http://www.ocbase.com/index.php/45-occt-4-4-2-available

Also I had a spelling error "not" should be "note". Typically front to back air flow is ideal. Also flipping CPU fan where air is pushed towards motherboard is ideal for cooling CPU. In current setup you are sucking in air from around the VRM and memory which is warmer then air supplied by the front intakes. Forcing air down into CPU still moves air across VRMs and DIMM.

  • 41 months ago
  • 1 point

I downloaded and ran OCCT in PSU yesterday. After 15 mins, I was showing 68 Celcius in the CPU socket, and 61 in both the CPU core and GPU. This was using HWMonitor. My room must have been much warmer then because I just ran it again today for a half hour and the CPU socket hovered at 59, the CPU core at 49 and the GPU at 45. No cause for concern there but I'll still try moving my bottom fan to the front and flipping the CPU fan around like you mentioned.

  • 41 months ago
  • 1 point

Summer time heat makes a big difference. My current idle temps from motherboard are around 35-38 degrees C while my home temps are 26-28 degrees. Without an thermometer measuring the intake temp on the cooler its a guesstimate. All you can do then is use the motherboard temp. Then subtract that from your high temp.

  • 41 months ago
  • 1 point

Here is a link to a review of the 400C. One of the tests they did was to move the fans to different locations. If you have good air flow then you don't need exhaust fans. The biggest take away is getting cold air to the coolers and making sure good flow gets it out. Without adding any more fans what is happening is that intake at the bottom is going to supply the GPU with cold air (very restricted anyways because most cases aren't tall enough for the fan to bring in enough air). However, there will be some blow by that gets past the GPU which pushes the now warm air up to the CPU. So the intake air of the CPU cooler is going to be warmer. If it is mounted on the front the two fans will push air front to back and lead to a better flow and less mixing. Although looking at it again I bet the best performance will be putting the bottom fan on top as intake in front of the CPU.

http://www.gamersnexus.net/hwreviews/2301-most-comprehensive-corsair-400c-benchmark-review-specs/Page-2

  • 41 months ago
  • 1 point

My motherboard idle temp is showing around 32 C. My house is about 25 right now. If my temps look good after moving the bottom fan to the front, I'll call it a done deal.

When you mentioned moving the bottom fan to the top, were you talking about my build, or the one in the review?

  • 42 months ago
  • 2 points

Cost for performance is pretty slick with this build. It won't break the bank, and will allow you to run most older titles with ease. (if that's what you like)

PSU is definitely overkill. I have a 750w 80+Gold powering a 6600k @ 4.9ghz and a 980ti. You would have been fine with a 500w, but room to upgrade in the future:)

Build looks very clean and even though it's not super high tech or expensive it has a nice look to it +1 OP :)

  • 41 months ago
  • 1 point

Thank you very much!

  • 42 months ago
  • 1 point

The PSU is a bit more wattage than you need imo

  • 42 months ago
  • 1 point

Get a gtx 1060, Rx 480 4 gb or Rx 470, get a 2 tb 64 mb cache with 7200 rpm, max out your fans bottom pulling in air with back and top pushing air our, and upgrade to zen 8core when it comes out.

  • 42 months ago
  • 1 point

Nice and cheap then...

sarcasm

  • 42 months ago
  • 1 point

actually yes it is http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16822146140&cm_re=2_tb_hdd-_-22-146-140-_-Product

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814131696&cm_re=radeon_rx_400_series-_-14-131-696-_-Product

zen 8 core will max cost $325 overall when it comes out plus you could sell the previous parts so the upgrade will cost like (including mobo, cpu, gpu, RAM, and HDD) max $550 plus you could sell the used parts for max $300, so for only $250 you could get a way better pc

  • 42 months ago
  • 1 point

Mmm yeah sure.

  • 42 months ago
  • 1 point

not sure what your point is

  • 42 months ago
  • 0 points

what you suggest is just plain stupid. he will have to upgrade his ram and mobo too so basicly the only thing he keeps are the psu and case...

  • 42 months ago
  • 1 point

yeah... its not stupid its called upgrading to play the new games at high to ultra settings for only $250 and it is not that hard

  • 42 months ago
  • 0 points

I get that but to upgrade so much is for me to much. I rather start a fully new system and use the old one as a stream machine, cloud computing system or give(sell) it to family or somone else

  • 42 months ago
  • 1 point

Ok so just build a whole new system I was just giving him some advice so it is capable of playing modern games at max settings. Plus if you build another system you get more experience and money from selling it

  • 41 months ago
  • 1 point

Actually it's great advice. And on that note...that's a great idea, building these machines and just selling them off! The truth is, I don't use these machines anywhere near their potential. Even this build is more than enough for me. I'm not really much of a gamer, about all I play is Minecraft. I just really enjoy putting these things together and it's a way for me to stay on top of what's happening with PC hardware. Building for customers would be a great way to justify spending more time and money into this hobby.

  • 42 months ago
  • 1 point
The 6 pin conector lmao

+1

  • 41 months ago
  • 1 point

I had a feeling that wasn't going to go unnoticed! :)