Description

Most of this build description will be composed of my experience with working with this case since most of the parts chosen are self-explanatory.

Thermaltake's Core V1 Mini-ITX case comes in relatively cheap and has the notable feature of being able to remove the side, top, front, and bottom panels. The top and side panels, held in place by thumbscrews, are interchangeable, though I have kept the panels in their original configurations to provide air vents for the graphics card and hard drives as well as keep dust from entering the case from the top. Room for cable management is provided at the bottom next to the power supply. The motherboard is laid horizontally, with plenty of vertical space for larger CPU fans or water cooling, though top mounted case fans are not an option.

I found that mounting the 10.55" graphics card took some effort, but was manageable in the end. The power cables are connected to it at the very top corner as well and fit only by bending the cables right at the connection.

The hard drives, mounted on the other side of the case, are connected to their respective cables from the top. There is little room to manage the cables here, especially so since my build contains 2 hard drives and 2 SSDs. The hard drives are also located at the bottom, meaning the cable always extend vertically before any cable management can be done. Cable management would be significantly easier for anyone running a single SSD, a single HDD, or both, as in that case, the drives would be positioned near the front of the case where the hole for bottom cable management is.

For ventilation, the front of the case takes a large variety of fans as well as room for a radiator. The rear of the case has room for 2 80mm fans, which, as a general rule, do not circulate much air. Poor cable management and large water cooling loops can especially hinder heat dissipation, which is vital in smaller form factor PCs. Several other Core V1 owners have set the vented side panels at the top and mounted fans on the grills through their own means as a form of makeshift top fans, though I am not nearly as adventurous.

As for the case's appearance, it is quite attractive with its cuboid shape. Its removable panels easily allowed me to spray paint the side and top panels. The top panel and front portion of the case required some disassembly before painting, however. The top panel's clear plastic is removed by bending its clasps 45 degrees, after which the plastic can be pushed out. The front is composed of three parts: the front grill, a dust filter, and the frame. The front is disassembled in the same way. The Thermaltake logo is not removable, though, and required me to mask it; luckily, though, the area surrounding the logo is depressed inwards, making masking as simple as making sure the masking tape filled in the area. Luckily the paint did not leak or pool in the area. The rest of the case is not painted simply because masking the front I/O ports and cable would be tedious not to mention risky. The paint used was Krylon Paint+Primer Satin Oxford Blue. Adding a strip of LEDs would certainly add to the appearance, though I personally prefer its simplicity.

Comments

  • 40 months ago
  • 2 points

This case reminds me of the Guardian skin for the M4A1-S and the USP-S in CS:GO! +1

  • 40 months ago
  • 1 point

I have the Core V21 and really like t how both the V21 and V1 have interchangeable side panels. One cool thing about the V21 is the front panel can be rotated and the front I/O shifted to face any direction. Does the V1 do this as well? I might pick it up to swap a media PC build into later on, but I'd like the rotating front panel...

  • 40 months ago
  • 1 point

Thermaltake does not specifically state whether this option is available on their website and included manual. I am not aware that the V1 can rotate the front panel, but looking again at the inner frame of the case it seems the front is held by 8 screws of some kind (http://www.modlabs.net/uploads/gallery/articles/13_V1.jpg). If the screw locations are symmetrical, it may be possible to rotate the front 180 degrees with a little bit of disassembly, though the trade-off would be losing the additional room for the graphics card at the front.

  • 40 months ago
  • 1 point

Honestly to see if the front panel rotates you just need to look at the back of the usb/power button unit. If there is a removable screw then you can rotate the case entirely and just remount the unit.

  • 40 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks for the info. I'm a fan of the cube design.

  • 40 months ago
  • 1 point

Is that mobo a gigabyte GA-H170N-WIFI? Just curious how you added those 80mm fans as i have the same case and motherboard but it only has 1 fan header which the 200mm fan is using

  • 40 months ago
  • 1 point

Oh somehow I forgot to add the motherboard haha. I always forget to overwrite the same part lists. It's the Gigabyte GA-H97N-WIFI. The 80mm fans are daisy chained along with the front fan to a single fan header.

  • 40 months ago
  • 1 point

Is three fans running from one fan header safe? i might do the same thing

  • 40 months ago
  • 1 point

I am not sure, but your safest option would be powering your fans with your power supply. The fans on my case are working in parallel, but I don't know the amps provided by the motherboard fan header nor the amp ratings of each fan.

  • 40 months ago
  • 1 point

Cheers for the info :)

  • 40 months ago
  • 1 point

I really like this build! Especially since you used that case. I have it's big brother and I'm super happy I picked it.

  • 40 months ago
  • 2 points

Thanks buddy, I like your build as well. My biggest regret of not choosing the V21 is the lack of micro ATX support, and therefore lower prices for motherboards and 4 slots for ram.

  • 40 months ago
  • 1 point

Nice, I got the same case wrapped in carbon fiber vinyl !

  • 40 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks man your carbon fiber wrapped build is also pretty sweet.

  • 40 months ago
  • 1 point

Wait you did identical builds or just swapped cases?

  • 40 months ago
  • 2 points

I have not had any prior correspondence with that user lol.

  • 39 months ago
  • 1 point

What did you use to paint the case. I have the same case and am looking to do the same type of design but in red.

  • 39 months ago
  • 1 point

Krylon Paint+Primer Satin Oxford Blue. I messed up by letting the paint pool on the front cover's left side as you can see in the pictures haha.

  • 38 months ago
  • 1 point

so you did two different coats im doing red got any suggestions on paint?

  • 38 months ago
  • 1 point

Oh no the spray paint's title is actually that (http://www.truevalue.com/assets/product_images/styles/xlarge/317321.jpg). It's a combination of primer and paint in one can. I can't say I have any recommendations on red paint, and it's all up to your personal preference. Usually spray paints have their caps the exact same color (and sometimes finish) it will turn out in. I also recommend paying attention to the kind of finish you want, i.e. flat, semi-gloss, or gloss. Also you can reference Jäßßäwöçkëë's build (http://pcpartpicker.com/b/PHPscf) in which he has more pictures on the painting process or shoot him some questions since his build uses some red paint.

  • 36 months ago
  • 1 point

beautiful color choice! it really suits the shape of the case! i'm totally copying you! thanks for providing paint type and hue!!!

  • 36 months ago
  • 1 point

You're welcome! Let me know how the build goes!

  • 36 months ago
  • 1 point

i know this is kind of early but i just ordered all the parts! the most exciting thing for me is this color i'm going to paint it! i'll be sure to let you know! also what are those white logos from? and how did you make the masks for them? they look pretty cool!

  • 36 months ago
  • 2 points

They're decals from Gundam plastic models, which are similar to plastic models of planes/tanks/etc but of giant robots. I had some leftover so I thought I might as well make use of them.

  • 36 months ago
  • 1 point

I have the same mobo and am considering an R9 280. I don't have the card yet but am concerned about having enough power on the mobo. Does your card power from the mobo (I think they're called PCIe connectors as per http://www.realhardtechx.com/index_archivos/Page362.htm), or just the PCI-E slot? And have you had any trouble power-wise in this build?

Looks great!

  • 36 months ago
  • 1 point

The graphics card is connected by the 6 and 8 pin connectors and powered directly by your power supply. It's similar to how the cpu has its own pins from the power supply. If you created your build list on Pcpartpicker it should list the power requirements at the top (https://drive.google.com/open?id=0ByRnL25efo5FbjFpdnJOaG9iZnc).

It would be your best bet for your power supply to have at least 100w more than the estimated requirement while also keeping potential, future upgrades in mind. I have not had any power-related issues in this build and I would also recommend getting at least at bare minimum a bronze-rated power supply.

Honestly the most trouble I had were thermal issues since the only fans on the case are the front fan and the rear 80mm fans, unlike the upgraded version of this case (Thermaltake V21). It's difficult for heat to escape this case haha.