Description

So I was an avid computer enthusiast back when computers were just becoming a thing. Fast forward 15 years, and I've decided to give it a go, and put my prior knowledge to the test (after brushing up on YouTube of course: LTT, Paul's Hardware, Awesomesauce, etc.) and build a custom skylake rig using the core i5 6600K. Was definitely looking to Overclock, so I also figured on an AIO cooler and because I love corsair, the H80i GT was an easy choice.

When I saw a couple reviews of the 450D case, I was pretty taken by the radiator support, and what looked like ample cable management opportunities behind the motherboard. Unfortunately that isn't really the case (no pun intended). With the length of the tubing on the AIO cooler, the only real option to mount the rad in push/pull (was dead set on using both fans) was to remove one of the included 140 mm intake fans from the front of the case, and mount the rad there. I then repurposed the 140 fan and top mounted that as an additional intake fan right over the CPU.

Cable management behind the motherboard was a pain in the ***. Not enough tie down points, and not enough access to run cables over the top of the motherboard. Also, the front IO HD audio cables weren't quite long enough, and are running across the entire bottom of the mobo. Also, the HD audio and the cables for corsair link are the only cables in my build that aren't all black. I'll be addressing this shortly. Also, the only storage listed on my build list is the SSD because I had a 500 GB 2.5" hard drive, and a 1 TB 3.5" drive laying around, so those are also in this build, although not listed.

In closing, I love the dark colors in this build, I love the way it came out, and if I could change anything, it would be the case.

Pros: great airflow, great Overclocking capabilities, great look/speed Cons: the case, the case, the case. Everything else is on point lol.

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Comments

  • 50 months ago
  • 2 points

"So I was an avid computer enthusiast back when computers were just becoming a thing." Awesome, so you were into computers in the 80's as well huh?

Nice build. +1

  • 50 months ago
  • 2 points

You've put the PSU upside-down. The fan should be facing down. Less heat in the case. :)

  • 50 months ago
  • 1 point

It doesn't really matter which way it's facing. Although I do recommend that it faces down.

While facing down, it draws cool air, instead of sucking in the warm air from your case and exhausts it.

Although yeah, I agree with you that the fan should be facing down instead of up.

  • 50 months ago
  • 1 point

Dude, common misconception. The PSU fan is NOT an exhaust fan, it is an INTAKE fan. The air is exhausted out the back of the case. Placing the fan facing up essentially gives you another way to exhaust air. Given the location of all of the inputs on the modular PSU, placing the fan facing up actually makes the runs of all of the cables shorter, and acts as a way to draw hot air away from the GPU.

  • 50 months ago
  • 1 point

Yes, the fan is an intake fan. However, you're giving more heat to the PSU, making the PSU fan run faster and making more noise. PSU are more efficient when the are cooler. Also, heat shortens life span.

The reason why mid to high end computer case makes these PSU fan exist at the bottom of the case is not for decoration.

Finally, heat goes up. So you're not really evacuating any heat from the inside. Old computer case had their PSU at the top for that reason. Having the PSU at the bottom thinking you're evacuating the heat means you're doing it wrong. Sorry!

Recommendation: turn your PSU fan facing down. But at the end, it's your build and you do what you want. I'm just giving you an advise.

  • 50 months ago
  • 1 point

PSU facing up or down doesn't matter as much as everyone assumes or proclaims it does. Airflow into the PSU is much better when it is pulling air from inside the case, unless the case has higher than normal clearance at the bottom (which the 450D doesn't have). The case sits very close to the surface it is on, and pulling air from inside the case (which is pretty cool as it is, considering the CPU isn't putting off any heat inside the case, and the heat from the GPU will theoretically rise, as you actually stated "heat goes up"). The PSU isn't pulling any hot air from the GPU, especially under load when the ACX 2.0 kicks in and pushes the heat from the GPU toward the top exhaust fan, and out of the case. Any heat generated by the PSU is NOT going into the case. Physics alone would dictate that. The heat is being forced out the back of the case.

  • 50 months ago
  • 2 points

Nice build! :)

  • 50 months ago
  • 1 point

I recommend flipping your front fans to intake air through the cooler.

  • 50 months ago
  • 1 point

Effectively, the front fans should be pushing air inside.

To make it simple, the air should be coming from the front and the bottom of the case, while exiting at the back and the top of the case. That's a good air flow.

  • 50 months ago
  • 1 point

Ditto. From the look of it, there aren't any intake fans at this time.

  • 50 months ago
  • 1 point

There are 2 intake fans actually. There is a 140 mm intake at the front, and a 140 mm intake at the top. I have done plenty of airflow tests, and airflow is absolutely not an issue. Trust me, I would much prefer 2 140 intakes at the front of the case, but the 450D doesn't really allow for a rad to be mounted at the back, or the top, in push/pull (which I already mentioned I was deadset on using for its overall cooling efficiency). If you guys would've read my description rather than just looking at the pictures, you would've known all that because I mentioned all of this, the intakes, the rad inefficiency, all of it.

At load, the GPU isn't getting above 58 C. Hardly evident of any airflow issues (as the CPU is cooled by an AIO cooler, airflow doesn't affect it as much as the GPU is affected)

  • 50 months ago
  • 2 points

The location of the cooler is all good. I mean the 120 fans on the radiator itself. The back fan (visible in pic 2), is push, which I can only assume makes the back fan pull. What I was recommending was keeping the push/pull, but flipping the fans so the air comes into the case, not out of it.

  • 50 months ago
  • 1 point

I may actually consider that, and kind of wished I had done it from the beginning. I actually might use the 2 120s as intake on the front, and the 2 140s as exhaust on the top and back.

  • 50 months ago
  • 1 point

I ended up flipping the other 140 mm fan in the front to exhaust, and the push/pull on the rad is also exhaust, and the 120 on the back and 140 on the top are both set to intake air. So the air comes into the case from the back and top, sweeps across the motherboard, and exhausts out the front of the case. I had to get a 120 mm fine mesh magnetic filter for the fan on the back, but it's working out really well so far.

  • 50 months ago
  • 1 point

If you have an intake fan in front, its blowing air contraflow the cooler fans. That's the reason why you should turn cooler fans.

And you have an intake fan at the top? Heat goes up! The top fans should be exhaust fans, like in the back!

It's like the world up-side down! Anyways, have fun...