Description

My first ever custom built pc. Ever since I was a kid I always dreamed of owning a pc that I had personally built from the ground up. I started back in 2012 after watching Linus Tech Tips and other videos that showcased reviews on different computer components and worked from there. Finding the parts that would provide the best performance at that time and which ones were compatible with one another. I would purchase each part one at the time over the stretch of 2 years. Starting with the case which isn't the one I have currently. It was a Corsair Vengeance C70 in Military Green with everything running on just air and the Corsair Hydro H100 for my CPU.

After putting everything together and seeing that the GTX 780 ti had debuted..... I started looking into what else might I be able to do for my computer? I started watching everyone go over custom liquid cooling options with Jayztwocents and other channels. Looking up what I can purchase from distributors like EKWB and FrozenCPU. Choosing what and how things would fit together. Obviously Water and Electricity threw up red flags in the beginning though curiosity got the better of me and I decided to go for it. I purchased the CPU block, the GPU blocks, the rads, the fittings, and tubing. Deciding how everything would run through my case and how much room I had to work with.

Everything overall was an awesome adventure filled with hurtles and bumps that would keep me up all hours of the night troubleshooting different problems and finding weird and new solutions. Big shot out to Overclock.net with helping me with all varieties of forums and guides from overclocking my CPU to 4.5 GHz to flashing the bios on my GPUs which was interesting because I waited around year before purchasing my second GTX 780. When the Asus GTX 780 was made available I purchased one and found that they went fast. So fast that it was one of the causes for me having to wait around year before I ever saw one again. My second 780 came with Elpida memory and a different Bios version. My cards have different bios versions and required I flash them one at a time with different custom bios.

I'm very happy with how far I've come with what I have and am hopeful for a future of more exciting and advanced hardware. I'm very pleased to see AMD ryze to the occasion with what the have to offer. I was an Intel and Nvidia fan though I'm willing to give AMD a shot and see where they take me.

Link to 3DMark Fire Strike Extreme 1.1: https://www.3dmark.com/3dm/27295600?

Comments

  • 12 months ago
  • 2 points

Awesome to see a classy build, straight from 2014 in a Crystal Case. Neat blend of new and old. The GTX 780 still kicks *** today, and having them in SLI sure helps, I bet.

  • 12 months ago
  • 1 point

Appreciate the support. The GTX 780's are powerhouses even today. They can handle 1440p with high to ultra settings on almost all games staying above 30 FPS and topping at 60 due to the monitor's FPS cap. I tried hooking them up to a 4K TV though with only 3GB of memory per card it just wasn't cutting it. I'll continue to add/upgrade where possible until I see something that can finally set my old beast to rest. Though for now I'm still a happy gamer.

  • 12 months ago
  • 2 points

Nice story and nice build!

I'm a bit confused, though. Sometimes you talk about GTX 780 ("I waited around year before purchasing my second GTX 780."), other times GTX 780 Ti ("When I purchased my second 780 it")

  • 12 months ago
  • 1 point

Apologies for any confusion. I purchased two Asus GTX 780's and currently have them in SLI. While waiting for my second card, the GTX 780 TI was released. I was still in infantile stages of the custom building world and had no idea that would happen. I was a little bummed out though am still pleased with just the GTX 780's, they pack a punch even today. Though at first I scoured the internet to see if I could have a Normal 780 and a 780 TI in SLI....

  • 12 months ago
  • 2 points

Thanks for the clarification. :)

As far as I know, you can SLI any two (SLI capable) GPUs. It just doesn't make much sense to do that for video cards that are highly different.

Also, as far as I know even with similar GPUs (not the same chip, but close enough) problems like micro-stuttering can happen.

So it's best doing it with the same GPUs (and even, with the same video card make and model) or just completely avoid SLI/Crossfire and buy the latest and best GPU. :)

  • 12 months ago
  • 1 point

If I decided to go with mix-matched GPUs it would really turn one into a Physx card. The load wouldn't really be shared equally between the two cards. Even with matching GPUs you have the option in Nvidia Control Panel to turn one into a dedicated Physx card. I currently have both GPUs set with different bios and overclocked with different settings. GPU 1 is at 1.359 MHz core clock with Mem at 3.549 MHz GPU 2 is at 1.372 MHz core clock with Mem at 3.240 MHz

  • 12 months ago
  • 1 point

In that case -- as far as I know -- you don't need SLI (the SLI bridge), just have the 2 GPUs. SLI is just a synchronization between the GPUs but since you won't use them to parallel rendering, there's no need for that.

Don't quote me on this though. Do a bit of research. :) I'm a bit short on time to do that. :/

  • 12 months ago
  • 1 point

Even with different bios and overclocks they can still be used in SLI. In MSI Afterburner I just select each card and inpout the different settings. SLI works best.

  • 12 months ago
  • 2 points

I wish they'd bring back the Sabertooth boards :(

Great build, good to see some older parts now and then, without a ton of bright lights and bling.

  • 12 months ago
  • 3 points

There are TUF boards for X299 and X270 that look pretty much the same.

  • 12 months ago
  • 2 points

Yeah, I suppose. Just wish Asus would bring them to LGA 1151 and AM4.

  • 12 months ago
  • 1 point

I agree! Especially for AMD AM4. I'm happy to see competition making waves. It was satisfying to see Intel try and steal AMD's hype with their 28 core processor and 8086K @ 5GHz and really see AMD just brush them off with a new 32 core processor! You can tell from previous boards that manufacturers put their best into Intel based boards though now we're seeing quality and stylish boards with AMD. Latest TUF boards seem to have lost their trademark dust/heat shroud though I hope they bring it back! Working with a custom loop, those covers have saved my rig a few times when I either run into a leak while power cycling or accidental spills while filling it up. It does also help keep dust from collecting on the board. Most of all just looks badass.

  • 12 months ago
  • 1 point

I'm excited to see what other TUF boards will appear in the future! I researched current TUF boards for AMD though wasn't really impressed. I can tell Intel was really everyone's main concern when it came to designing and improving workstation/gaming mobos. Now with AMD on the Ryze I hope Asus and MSI will work more towards offering both stylish and more durable mobos. I noticed Asus was offering backplates as well with some boards and hope to have a TUF board with that to help with GPU sag. I'm happy with what I have now though I am itching to tear everything apart and work from square one again. It's incredibly satisfying to work on something with your own hands and then see the results. More so when things just work out!

  • 12 months ago
  • 1 point

I fully agree. The main reason why I choose the board from Asus was due to their awesome 5 Year Warranty. It just blew their competition out of the water and it looks amazing for its time. I wanted something that would catch the eye and had the power to back it up. Pairing this with the i7 3770K was amazing. With help from Overclock.net I was able to immediately hit 4.5 GHz with this board no problem. Over the years curiosity got the better of me with delidding the CPU and replacing the thermal compound. I started with Arctic Silver and now have Thermal Grizzly Conductonaut between the IHS and CPU die with Innovation Cooling Graphite Thermal Pad 40 x 40 between the IHS and EK waterblock. Tops at 70-80c in synthetic benchmarks like Prime95 or Cinebench. Normal workloads would peak in the low 70c then drop between 50-60c.

  • 12 months ago
  • 2 points

Well done!!

  • 12 months ago
  • 1 point

Thank you!

  • 12 months ago
  • 2 points

Nice build! Would be perfect if the 780 had 6GB tho.

  • 12 months ago
  • 2 points

Appreciate the compliment! I know right! They're still capable at 1440p though so I'll just wait to see what Nvidia and AMD have in store for us. Intel as well in 2020 will be joining the ranks in the GPU world.

  • 12 months ago
  • 2 points

how did you fit a radiator on the top i tried fitting a 280mm on top and it was bumping in my motherboards vrm heatsink?

  • 12 months ago
  • 1 point

With the Asus Sabertooth Z77 and Memory modules, it was difficult with anything larger than 30mm thickness. I used an EKWB Slim 240mm Radiator. It is only 28mm thick and allowed for it to mount at the top with two normal corsair fans. Even with how thin it was, I still had to take out the corsair ram sticks and then install the rad and fans. After they were securely mounted, I could reinstall my memory. At first I didn't know what the tolerances were and purchased the case. After receiving it I saw the problem and had to order the Slim Radiator to fit two in this case. I wish Corsair had made the case a tad bit taller to allow for a normal radiator at the top. I'm sure with a little modification you could though at the moment I'm happy with the slim rad there. Temps are a degree hotter than with a normal rad though nothing that draws a concern.