Description

Firstly, thank you for taking the time to look at my new build.

I don't normally post stuff online, however I found this site so helpful when building my computer, as a kind of thank you, I thought I'd do a build page in the hope it may help someone else.

This is my first ever build, I'm 40 years old and I'd been wanting to do one for a good few years now, but with a busy work and home life I never got round to it. I have a laptop and an Apple iMac, so just muddled along with them until now. I've taken 3 years off work (just to take time out and refresh), although at the end of the 3 years now, I finally had some time to dedicate to this.

I spent four solid weeks researching, looking at review after review, searching for the best prices, and watching videos on how to actually build it, I found the build very easy to do in the end, and the PC turned on and everything worked first time around.

I'm not a gamer by any means, the last game I played was Mario Kart on the Super Nintendo, and that is no lie! But I wanted to build a computer that I could play some games on, I only really use my Apple iMac for Handbrake to backup all my Blurays to stream over my home network. So this build was probably very overkill for what I actually needed, but I'm really pleased with the parts I bought, I absolutely don't mind paying extra for good quality and good features, and I feel I got that. I have no plans to overclock anything. I didnt have a budget as such, I just wanted a system that was a reasonable spec that would still be fast in a few years time, with good quality components, that being said I made sure I got a good deal on what I did buy.

I've run a handful of benchmark test, and I'm very pleased as it comes up with superb results, one of the benchmarks said it was 98% better than most other computers, so that was pleasing, with another benchmark giving it 125% score for gaming and 132% score for desktop usage.

I'll make a quick note about a few of the items that stood out to me, the Crosshair board for starters, very nicely made, with lots of bells and whistles, very easy to work with and so many options and settings to play with. I also needed a board that had a BIOS flashback facility to take the new Ryzen CPU.

The NZXT H510 case, for the price I dont think this can be beaten, there was plenty of room in the front of the case for what I needed, I did find the cable management at the rear a little snug though, but this was mainly due to the PSU extension cables I added. This case is very well thoughtout, and I have to say the build quality is very high. I was on the verge of getting a £180 Phanteks case, and I'm really pleased I didn't.

The BeQuiet PSU, German engineering at it's finest!, it has a real premium look and feel to everything about it, even down to the cables and packaging. I read about single rail vs multiple rails, and Over Current Protection, as a result of my research it was a must I got a Multi Rail PSU, which this is, I know I could have probably got away with a 650W PSU, but typical me, I like to be on the safe side and don't leave anything to chance.

The Sapphire Nitro+ GPU, what a monster! I knew it was a size, but it's only when you unbox it you truly realise just how big and heavy this beast is, it's actually like a house brick. That being said it seems very well made. For £300 I felt it was a very good deal, it also came with 3 months free XBOX pass, and two free games.

The Dell monitor, very high quality, I was put off by the quality control or lack of it on a lot of other manufacturers monitors, especially when I looked into IPS screens, this particular one had very good reviews, and Dell appears to make good quality monitors from what I read. Very pleased with the picture quality and the colours.

ASUS, I have no experience with the standard ASUS products, but their ROG products are pure premium, even the boxes they come in are premium made, the keyboard came with velvet cover pouches, detachable braided USB lead, detachable NUM pad, the mouse had a plastic protection cover over the bottom of the mouse (none of the other so called premium mice came with this), spare switches, detachable braided USB lead, a spare normal USB lead, storage pouch, its these little touches I dont mind paying extra for. The design team at ASUS really know what they are doing. You really feel like your getting something special with the quality of product.

Western Digital, I have 24 of their RED 3Tb / 4TB drives currently, 12 have been in NAS enclosures for the last 7 or 8 years (and 12 then as backups to these), I've never had one issue with them and they are used a lot, so this is why I continued with the brand. For the two 4TB blue drives I bought, it was actually a fair bit cheaper to buy the 4TB Portable Elements Desktop USB enclosure and rip the 4 TB blue drives out of it, this saved me £25 per drive at the time by doing this, crazy considering you get a plug adaptor, the enclosure, and a USB lead, and its still £25 cheaper than buying the OEM drive on its own, it comes in a nice retail box too with adequate protection, so I didnt have the usual worry about how well the retailer was going to package the OEM drive up.

Any negatives? I was a little disapointed with the cablemod extension cables, I was going to get MDPC-X extension cables made, but there was a 3 week wait, and I didnt want to delay things further, I didnt like the thought of building the computer only to have to rip it all apart to fit the cables out 3 weeks later. The cablemod cables had very good reviews everywhere, I felt I was getting a better product over some of the other cable extensions that are available for half the price of these. I had nothing to compare them to but I was a little disapointed when they arrived , I just assumed they would maybe be a little better quality than what they were. They were a sod to bend too!, and I must have spent the same amount of time on building the computer as I spent trying to get these cables neat and straight. If I had the choice again, I think for all the hassle it would have been, I'd have gone with the MDPC-X cables.

I'll answer a few questions I may get -

  • I have undervolted the Sapphire card, and I have applied applied D.O.C.P profile to memory, but thats all I plan to do.

  • Why did I pay £90 for Windows 10, well I didnt want the hassle of buying these £20 CD keys where its pot luck whether the code works, for as many that work their seems to be as many that dont. The version I bought is the lifetime version too not an OEM. Personally it was a small price to pay to know that it was genuine and that it would work straight out of the box, for £90 I honestly couldnt be bothered with the hassle that could potentially be involved with it.

  • Why X470 instead of X570, well I was going to purchase a Gigabyte X570 a few days after release, until I started to see posts about the fan noise, and then various other issues, I think the fan was the part that ultimatly put me off in the end with all these new boards. I also found to get a good quality board with good quality VRM's and the features I was looking for, you really needed to spend around the £300 - £500 mark, which I felt was excessive when I compared it to the £212 Crosshair board I got.

  • Why Vega64 when the new generation has just been released, this was probably one of the longest decisions I had to make, and I went back and forth over it, ultimately I liked the look of the Sapphire card compared to the reference RX5700 cards, and I didnt really want to wait any longer for the aftermarket cards to come out, which I'm sure would have been around the £400 mark, so at £300 I opted for the Sapphire Vega64, I felt in a few years time it would probably have a decent re-sell value too if I did want to upgrade it.

  • Why TN panel over IPS, I kept reading review after review about the IPS lottery, with backlight bleed and a lot of other quality issues, I drove myself mad looking at articles and reviews, I just decided to get the TN panel for an easy life in the end, I like things to be perfect, so I didnt want to spoil the joy of a new monitor by looking for faults.

  • Why not AIO cooling, this caused me many a sleepless night too!, I would really have liked an AIO cooler, but water and electricity is not a good mix, maybe I shouldn't read so many reviews as I do, but even one failed unit was probably enough to put me off to be honest, I was on the verge of getting a Deepcool Anti-Leak AIO, simply because it was Anti-Leak, but it was very new out so there wasnt enough reviews for my liking to really see how it performed. I also had a vision of a black and white build in my head and the Noctura fans did a better job at accomplashing this, plus I have no plans to overclock the 65 watt Ryzen.

  • I've not got the front two intake Noctua fans turned on, at the moment they are just for show, I'm going to test temperatures at some point and see whether they are better on or off, reviews suggest to only have two exhaust fans only for optimum cooling.

  • Why all the ASUS products, well as I said previously their ROG product lines are very high quality for one, but as much as I didnt really want an RGB light show initially, I did get hooked on it by the end, so I wanted all the lighting to sync together, and to have as few programs to control things as possible, ulitmately you could have 3 or 4 different programs to control your lighting and they still wouldnt sync with each other, so sticking with ASUS solved this. Out of everything the Sapphire card is the only item that doesnt sync automatically, everything else is synced together, but I knew that beforehand anyway.

  • I have a Phanteks LED strip on the inside roof of the case next to the glass, and one on the outside of the case that lights the wall up. (I did have both inside the case but the second one was too much (some may argue that one is too much!).

  • The desk is from Ikea (the top is from their kitchen worktop range "Karlby Walnut", perfect size for my room (186cm x 65cm x 4cm), they do include two side strips should you need to cut it, price was £120. Their "Alex" units fit nicely underneath, the drawer unit (not shown in photo) was £55 and the cupboard unit was £45. I was really pleased with this its really sturdy, and I think it looks really smart.

I appear to have gotten a little carried away with writing, what maybe should have been a few summary lines has turned into a book, that being said, I found this site the most useful out of all the sites on went on, I really feel I would have struggled if it wasnt for this site, such a simple idea but such a poweful tool, so if it helps just one person then it was worth the time it took to write the above.

On a seperate note, as I mentioned resourses above, I found the GamersNexus videos fantastic, as well as HardwareCanucks especially in helping me decide on a case. Buildzoid for helping me decide on which motherboard to get, as well as actually learning quite a lot of technical stuff. As well as watching a fair few Der8auer and Kitguru videos too.

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Comments

  • 4 months ago
  • 4 points

Oh my god, it’s beautiful...

  • 4 months ago
  • 1 point

Thank you.

  • 4 months ago
  • 4 points

Heres my one and only tip for improving this. Please don't put terms and service in your description. Lol

  • 4 months ago
  • 2 points

How are temps on the 3700x with that Noctua? I was thinking of pairing them also but worried it might not be enough. Awesome build!

  • 4 months ago
  • 3 points

It hovers around 35 degrees on idle in windows, and I've never seen it much above 60 degrees on load, although I've not really done too much to push it though, just been messing around on it so far running benchmarks, I've played a few games for like 20 minutes or so. I should also say that I have my fans set to a silent profile so they dont spin very fast (I think they're running around 500RPM), so if I set the fans to their standard setting it may cool it a bit better. Once I start using the computer heavily I'll have to adjust my fan curves. I haven't overclocked the CPU, and I have it on the Ryzen balanced power plan. Personally I think most air fans will be fine with the 3700X certainly if your not overclocking it, but I don't think I'm the best person to ask about it as I haven't tested / stressed it enough currently.

  • 4 months ago
  • 2 points

Wow. I just turned 14, and when my school break comes in 2 months I'll work at some fast-food restaurant (or retail store) so I can build a 1800cdn setup with the ryzen 7 3700x cpu and the rx 5700 xt. I have been researching how to build PC's and all my components, and compatibility for a month now. I am just some teen that's going to work so i can get enough money to build a moderately good gaming pc(I will only work during school breaks because I value my education and good grades, and I don't have time to work and do sports), and you're out here going completely overkill for not much overkill reasons(no offense intended). Welp, those are the benefits of having a good job(and I can't tell a 40 year old man what to do with his money). I congratulate you on making this amazing build come to life, I hope you enjoy it for years to come.

  • 4 months ago
  • 2 points

Might have been a better idea to invest in a 1660 Ti rather than a Vega 64. Although it does perform better in raw tests, the 1660 Ti is much newer and has had ray tracing unlocked a couple months ago through a drivers update. Not saying it would be a good idea as it would run at 30 FPS but still a useful feature.

  • 4 months ago
  • 1 point

In all honesty I wanted to stay away from nVidia.

  • 4 months ago
  • 1 point

Ok fair enough

  • 4 months ago
  • 1 point

Stunning!!! I have an H400i in white and love it...

  • 4 months ago
  • 2 points

Thank you, I'm really pleased with it.

  • 4 months ago
  • 1 point

Hi, you have a beautiful system, My only comment / suggestion is that I watched a video review of the NZXT H510 on Gamer Nexus and a few other sites. This is a negative pressure air flow case. So my suggestion is that instead of using your Noctua fans in the front panel position you replace your 2 stock exhaust fans with the Noctua fans, and return your other 2 fans if possible or keep as ready spares.

  • 4 months ago
  • 1 point

Hello, I watched the exact same video!..... I mentioned above that currently the front two intake fans are just for show, I appreciate your comment though hopefully others will read it that are unaware, as if I had not watched the GamersNexus video I would have been none the wise about the negative pressure on this case.

  • 4 months ago
  • 1 point

Nice build ! With an AIO it would have been even prettier :) I've been using the same AIO for 7 years, just go with a renowned brands like corsair and you should be fine. (Of course it's always a bit of a gamble).

  • 4 months ago
  • 1 point

Looks great! Job well done!

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

Thank you.

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

Great build, and I appreciate the lengthy write-up! I'm about to build in the NZXT H510 myself this weekend and also decided against liquid cooling for now (a cost consideration).

How do you find the airflow at the front of the case? I read that it isn't great because of the closed front panel, making me have a bit of buyer's remorse.

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

I've found it fine for playing games, it runs whisper quiet even on some of the more heavy duty games.

The only issue I've noticed so far is when I use Handbrake to transcode media, the CPU temp goes up to around 72 - 73 degrees, and then once every few minutes it will hit 75 degrees which then causes all the fans to ramp up to full speed, they go on full speed for around 5 to 10 seconds then it drops back down to 72 - 73 degrees for another few mintues before again going back up to 75 degrees, and boy can you hear the fans, this case has no insulation what so ever.

I've noticed that there was a lot of dust gathering on the fins of the CPU and rear fans, which has suprised me as the computer has probably only had around 30 hours up time so far, and the room is not used apart from this, so I have activated the front two fans to try and reduce the dust.

Without messing around too much with everything yet, I found that if I set the fans to a fixed RPM of 1000 it managed to keep the temps steady at around 69 - 70 degrees while using Handbrake. The only issue I personally had with this was that when I load Windows the Asus Fan Expert software for some reason seems make one of the fans go up and down quickly in speed around the 800 - 1200 RPM mark rather than fixing it at 1000, which is annoying as I had to open the software up and just nudge the slider for the fan to settle back down.

So what I have settled with for the time being is the following, I have put the fan profile back to automatic, I have created two shortcuts on the desktop for the Ryzen balanced power plan, and a secondary power plan, the secondary power plan I have reduced the maxium CPU usage to 99%, and I use this power plan when running Handbrake. This mean the CPU doesnt boost above 3.6ghz but now when running Handbrake it runs at around 45 degrees, and I cant really say I've noticed any drop in performance on Handbrake either. So to be honest I'm probably going to continue with this method, I'm much happier with it running for hours on end in Handbrake at 45 degrees than 75 degrees.

I have to say the case is stunning, but airflow / thermals and noise is quite poor, and it can be quite loud if you have it sat on the desk. That said I still wouldnt change it as it really shows off the build, but there is certainly a compromise with it.

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

Good bulid, forbme it looks very good but I have a question what is the tempeture that have de cpu and gpu when you play. Is because I want to buy it that case and I am searching recomendation

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

Its very cool when playing games the fans on the GPU hardly ever kick in (I noticed the GPU temp around 40 to 50 degrees on a handful of games, to be honest I've not really looked too much as it runs cool). The fans do kick in when the CPU boosts though, like when I am running Handbrake, as the CPU was hovering around the 75 degree mark, I have solved this though by setting CPU maximum to 99%. I loose the boost function but it never goes above 45 degrees when using Handbrake now. If your going to use an AIO cooler then it wont be an issue for you, or if your happy to ramp your fans up to a noticable level then again it wont be an issue.

I think I would sum it up by saying, if you want to show off your build then this is the case to get, if your not that bothered about showing it off, then I would look for a case with better airflow.

Things to note: There is very little insulation, so fan noise is very noticable. Dust build up seems to be an issue too.

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

A little late, but also curious about the temps with front fans. I've seen the GN video showing they don't make a difference, but just wondering from your personal experience. I'm replacing the two exhaust fans with some LL120's, and was going to slap the two original on the front. And I appreciate the lengthy description! I'm sure someone could learn a thing or two from reading it. Your time/effort is appreciated!

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

gorgeous

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

Looks great, I used this as inspiration for my build :)

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

Thank you, thats so nice to hear. I hope your build went well and your pleased with it.

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

cool

  • 4 months ago
  • -1 points

Do you like writing essays?

  • 4 months ago
  • 3 points

I'm new to all this, I just thought there may be something in what I wrote that someone found helpful.