Description

I wanted to build a really nice computer as a gift to myself. I do video work professionally, and I enjoy video games in as high a quality as I can get them. I purchased the parts between 2015 October and 2016 February, only getting each one when it was on sale for its lowest cost based on this website's price history. This way, I could attain some amazing parts on a budget. This was also my first time building a computer myself, but binge-watching videos from Carey Holzman on YouTube gave me the knowledge and confidence I needed to assemble it successfully.

The biggest problem during the build was the motherboard with its completely inadequate manual. MSI seems to have attached a decorative plate over the ports by putting screws into two of the standoff holes while the manual shows these holes open and ready to go. Putting the board in as-is caused the ports to be very skewed from the I/O shield. Removing the standoffs at those points, though, caused the board to sag and be skewed the opposite direction. When I realized the issue, I carefully removed that decorative plate (the screws also had nuts on the underside) and it fit like a charm.

Another issue of note is that this aftermarket CPU cooler blocks the first RAM slot and touches the very top of the RAM in the second slot. This will not be an issue if your RAM does not have a tall, decorative heat shield - but my RAM does. Even so, I don't predict ever needing more than 16 GB of RAM for several years, so it is not a real problem. (EDIT: No, I installed the cooler backwards. Half inexperience, half vague manual. See final image.)

This rig runs dead silent, even under heavy load. Usual temperatures read between 26°-29°C; the highest temperature it has reached, experienced during high video game load, is 46°C. This is a combination of the excellent airflow of the case, the superior on-board cooling of the video card, and that monster of a CPU cooler. However, I would say temperatures would be perfectly adequate even with a stock Intel fan - I just failed to realize in time that this CPU does not come with one.

All of these fantastic components alongside Windows 10 Home 64-bit have created an excellent PC experience. 3DMark benchmarks return a standing of "better than 97%" of other rigs tested.

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Comments

  • 46 months ago
  • 2 points

Great job.+1

  • 46 months ago
  • 2 points
Great build you have here! Despite you had to wrestle your RAM's heatsinks is what it sounds like, it looks lovely and clean. Plus one.

I wanted to build a really nice computer as a gift to myself. I do video work professionally, and I enjoy video games in as high a quality as I can get them. I purchased the parts between 2015 October and 2016 February, only getting each one when it was on sale for its lowest cost based on this website's price history. This way, I could attain some amazing parts on a budget.

Curious George moment, how much did you spent in total? I do understand on where you are coming from to attain good budget deals, plus buying parts gradually. Again, great work and enjoy your new PC.
  • 46 months ago
  • 2 points

All in all, in the ballpark of $1600.

  • 46 months ago
  • 2 points

I'm loving the Universal cooler! +1

  • 46 months ago
  • 1 point

Other commenters pointed out that I installed it backwards. How embarrassing!

  • 46 months ago
  • 2 points

The reason the cooler blocks your ram slots is because you have it installed 180 degrees backwards ! Take you CPU cooler and rotate it the correct way, with the arrows on towards the rear and you will have ram clearance issue.

  • 46 months ago
  • 1 point

Thank you, I had no idea based on the manual it came with. It's funny how over the last month of it being complete and several tech friends seeing it, no one noticed such a thing. I'm glad I decided to post it here.

  • 46 months ago
  • 1 point

I've reinstalled it properly. No more blocked RAM slots and the cooler should be able to function properly now. Thanks for bringing this to my attention.

  • 46 months ago
  • 2 points

Glad to be of assistance. One of the key selling points of the cryorig is the ram clearance, hence the thin first fan.

  • 46 months ago
  • 1 point

Plus the arrows on the fans themselves kinda help to know the direction of airflow.

  • 46 months ago
  • 2 points

hes right your cooler is def facing the wrong way... the smaller fan up front makes it so it wont block your ram. while i loooove the lightning 980ti, i hate that they made it yellow.

  • 46 months ago
  • 1 point

While it looks like it's supposed to be yellow, looking at it in the case it's definitely a slightly greenish yellow that matches the motherboard's temperature display and overclock knob+reset perfectly.

  • 46 months ago
  • 2 points

I like it all the way around.

What do you think of that 750D case, i heard a lot of good things about it, but just mainly from youtuber reviews not from real people.

  • 46 months ago
  • 2 points

It's an amazing case. The internal space is staggering, so working in it I never once felt cramped. Corsair makes 'em smart, a perfect blend of metal and plastic. Room for as many SSDs and HDDs as you could want and the cages can be easily removed to take off some weight and improve air circulation. Admittedly it does look a little silly to have an optical drive in this case, since the case is wider than the drive. Their 400R case is also good, and I'd have used it if it could fit this video card.

  • 25 months ago
  • 1 point

Hi, Etiehr. Let me start off by saying that this is a great build. I have a very similar build and I was thinking about upgrading my CPU Cooler to the Cryorig R1 Universal. I also have the same Corsair 750D case as you. My question is: how much space is there between the top of the CPU Cooler and the side panel of the case? So yeah, if you still use this website, could I get your help please? Thanks.

  • 46 months ago
  • -3 points

Nice build. +1! werent you worried though when you bought each part one by one and 1 of them might not work?

  • 46 months ago
  • 1 point

I planned out all the parts well in advance and trusted this website's compatibility checker, so I knew they would work together. If you mean a hypothetical in which I received a dead-on-arrival part, that would have been a pain but it would've been the fault of the company/merchant rather than anything I could have prevented.

  • 46 months ago
  • 2 points

yeah, that's what worries me is DOA parts.. i really want to build my own pc soon but i need to save as much money as i can and i can do that by buying one by one whenever its on sale.. Noob question though, if you do RMA, do you go directly to the manufacturer or the store you bought from?

  • 46 months ago
  • 1 point

Since none of my parts were DOA, I can't give any insight into the process. I would expect it works like any bad product, return to the merchant for a refund. For example, when I ordered Windows 10 I received a copy of Office instead, which I returned with no penalties against me. If you got a part with a warranty together and it was DOA, I think then you could go through the manufacturer. I don't know anything more than common sense on this subject though, never had to do it.