Description

Used for my business and the occasional game. This isn't intended to top the charts, instead it's intended to last many, many years. No overclocking, just some conservative RAM tweaking and CPU voltage regulation to conserve a few dollars off my electricity bill. No RGB besides what came with some components. The computer will live in a separate room isolated from the my studio control room.

Triple booting Win10, Win7, and Manjaro Linux. Each on their own NVMe drive.

The HDD bays will be filled out with older WD Black 7200 RPM disks to complement the new WD Reds for cold storage and backup.

I don't trust consumer grade SATA controllers, so included is an LSI 9211-8i IT mode HBA. CD/DVD drives go through the MOBO's SATA controller.

Build is complete except for the case, a Nanoxia Deep Silence 6, which is out of stock until February. So, in the mean time, I threw it into a cheap Rosewill full tower.

Unfortunately, due to part availability when ordered, the motherboard is the Asus Prime TRX40-Pro. I would like to have purchased the Gigabyte Aorus Master, but it was sold out. Furthermore, the ML240 will be upgraded to a 360mm AIO solution once the Deep Silence 6 is available. The current Rosewill Nighthawk 117 might fit it, but the clearance to the TRX40 heat sinks is very close, so I opted for a 240m AIO. Regardless, the 240mm rad does the business well enough.

Not seen is a Lynx AES16e interface for audio connectivity. That will go in once the build is fully tested and production ready.

Part Reviews

Case

I purchased this case for Threadripper 3960X build, but only because the case I intended to use was on back order for a few months (Nanoxia Deep Silence 6).

Overall, the case is excellent value for money, especially if you require a case with room for disk storage beyond what is "normal." For my business, I keep many TB of backup, so the more 3.5" HDD bays, the better.

Pros:

-Decent amount of 3.5" HDD Bays

-Decent layout and through holes for cable management, most of which have grommets.

-Good amount of 140mm fan mounting locations.

-Will accept many radiator sizes if your MOBO allows for it.

-Frame is constructed from relatively thick steel.

Cons:

-The PCB used for USB 2.0 headers, front panel audio, and USB 3 pass-through cables is INCREDIBLY cheap. In fact, I disconnected it entirely. The solder joints looked so horrible, I feared it would cause a short.

-The external SATA bay is a nice touch, but after seeing how bad the front panel USB/Audio PCB was, I didn't waste any time in removing it.

-The top panel "exhaust" fins do nothing but constrict airflow since they fall down into the "shut" position very easily. Mercifully, they were easy enough to remove.

-The cheap acrylic window panel is very brittle. In fact, mine arrived in the box cracked at the edges. It is now nothing more than a rattle. Hot glue to the rescue, I guess.

Other:

-It would be incredibly nice if this case had a removable motherboard tray, but for its price, I can't complain.

-Depending on your PSU dimensions, a 140mm fan mounted on the bottom just barely fits, and I mean BARELY.

-Included fans are loud and relatively low quality, but for the price, I can't complain. I opted for Noctua fan replacements.

-Plastic panels are, as expected, pretty brittle. Use care when removing the top and front panels.

-The front panel has a non-removable mesh filter, while the bottom PSU intake vent has a removable mesh filter. Not the best design, especially for the front filter since you have to remove a brittle panel to access and clean it.

-The power on and activity LEDs are very bright. If your computer is powered on 24/7 and it lives where you sleep, you might want to take that into consideration.

Final Thoughts:

Rosewill, overall, did a good job for a sub $75 case. I got mine on sale for well under that, but even for $75, if I was on a tight budget, I'd have been pretty happy. Some of the cons I listed are significant to me, but I'm pretty nit-picky. That USB/Audio PCB was pretty heinous looking, though.

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Comments

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

Now this is a sick build

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

If you're gonna pay that much, then it'd be more efficient if you paid an extra for 2080ti. But amazing build anyways +1

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

I hear ya, but I really don't have a need for a 2080TI. For sure, it's an expensive build, but spending 500-700 more on a GPU wasn't in my budget. If my work benefited from the added horsepower, then I'd have considered it.

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  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

Latency on Threadripper 3000 isn't really the best for DAW work. You ideally want to get your memory to 3600Mhz to cut down on memory latency, since Threadripper 3000 has more memory latency than X570.

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

Unfortunately, the reviews and research I did prior to buying were all done before release. If the "normal" reviewers actually did any DAW testing, then I might have taken this into account when putting the system together. On the other hand, I plan on using this build for many years, so I made the choice to opt for the extra PCIe lanes available for TR 3.

You are right, however. The Threadripper 3 CPUs seem to have some latency issues. In fact, Asus and Realtek seem to be the most sensitive to this issue, though I'm no expert on the deep level technicalities. I've just looked around Google for information, and it seems Windows made some changes around v1903 and earlier that cause latency for some devices. It is my hope that latency will come down as drivers and BIOS mature for the new hardware.

My solution, thus far, has been to disable the Realtek audio device in BIOS. This has mitigated the latency to an extent.

On the bright side, most of my work is not live recording where round trip latency is of utmost importance. The bulk of my work these days is in mixing and mastering, so the latency, while troublesome, is not a show stopper as of yet. That said, I'm still tweaking the system and setting things up, so I've not yet retired my old setup.

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

Very nice build and components. Congratulations! Me an many content creators are now very jealous! My only Q is why you went with a $75 case when you originally ordered a $400 case (list price). I just thought you would have spent more on it. That's all.

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

Yeah, that was an issue. Unfortunately, I ordered a Nanoxia Deep Silence 6, but their stock was out. Nanoxia customer service told me that they'd be in stock again by February, so I bought a cheap case that would "do the business" in the short term. The Rosewill was actually cheaper than listed since it was on sale during Black Friday and Cyber Monday.

Even more annoying was that I bought the DS6 when it cost 350. They upped the price to reflect new tariffs when they informed me that they were out of stock and cancelled my original order. Bummer.

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

What DAW do you use?

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

Most of my workflow is with Reaper, but I also use Nuendo/Cubase on a regular basis. For certain tasks I use Samplitude as well.

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

Hello

Strong build. Can you provide some cpu under load temps?

  • 1 month ago
  • 2 points

Stock Full Load (Saturation): 80-85c Stock Idle: 40-42c

No overclocks, CPU/RAM stock DOCP.

Long story short, I only went with the 240 because the case I want is on back order. The cheap case I did get might fit a 360, but it'd be damn close.

YMMV, but I'd suggest a 360 if you expect extended full load operation.

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

thanks

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