Description

I use this machine for schoolwork and some casual gaming. I chose to go Ryzen for this build because at this price point, Ryzen seemed to be the best bang for the buck. Originally I had the Ryzen 5 1500x in mind, but I was able to get a 1600 with more cores for the same price. I am looking to overclock this processor. Also, I want to add more rgb bling to this build, any rgb kit suggestions would be awesome! Another thing I will be needing some suggestions on is a monitor. Currently, I have a 17 inch dell monitor from 2008, the only way I was able to hook it up to my pc was through a vga to hdmi converter. I want to get a new monitor for under $200 with a decent refresh rate and with a 24 or 27 inch screen size. Of course it will have to be 1080p! I had no problems with this build and I will surely be building more systems in the future.

Comments

  • 14 months ago
  • 3 points

Nice first build. A couple things to look out for. First of all, see if you can get that RAM running at a higher clock speed. There are some good videos on RAM overclocking on YouTube. Ryzen is REALLY sensitive to memory speed, so the faster the better. I think for sure you can get 2666 MHz, maybe even 2933 if you're lucky. That will help performance without costing you anything. Also, good call on getting the 2x4GB kit rather than a 1x8GB kit. That will mean you are running your memory in dual-channel mode and will get better performance. And you have four DIMM slots (nice!) so you can throw 8 more gigs in if you need to.

The 1600 comes with the Wraith Spire, which is solid for a stock cooler. If you're looking for an affordable option that looks great and performs significantly better than stock, the Cryorig H7 has a great reputation. I'm using it to cool my 1600 OC'ed to 3.95 GHz at 1.325 V, and it's doing okay even under extreme stress testing. You may get lucky and get a golden chip that will do 4.0 GHz at low voltage, but for me the aftermarket cooler really came in handy.

As far as RGB goes, I am using a Phanteks RGB strip that came with my case. They sell them in a kit of 2 along with an adapter you can use to control them with your motherboard. I'm not sure whether or not your board has an RGB header, but alternatively, they sell RGB controllers you could use instead. The Aigo fans linked above seem decent, but I would be concerned that there's no way to control the fan speed. I've heard really good things about Thermaltake's Riing RGB fans (regular Riing, not Riing Plus). They'll be a little more money but they seem like better quality. I've used the blue LED version in a friend's build, and they are nice.

We have very similar builds! If you have any questions when it comes time to OC, hit me up. I'm not an expert, but I have the same chip and mobo chipset, so maybe I could be of service.

  • 14 months ago
  • 1 point

Hey Jnathanroy, I am new to overclocking so this might seem like a dumb question. Can I OC my 1600 to 3.6 GHz at the same voltage as it is stock or will I have to change the voltage. I know it is different for everyone but I just want to get an idea of how I could overclock the processor. I don’t want to do 3.9 or maybe even 4 GHz until I get something like the cryorig h7. Also do you have any suggestions for a decent 1080p monitor under $200? Thanks for the help!

  • 14 months ago
  • 1 point

Not a dumb question at all. As I understand it, voltage settings don't quite work the same way as clock speeds. If you leave it "stock" when you OC to 3.6 GHz, your motherboard will automatically regulate voltage and there will be fluctuation depending on what you are doing. It should be okay, but I would go manual. The advantage of setting a manual voltage value (usually for Ryzen you will end up between 1.3 and 1.4 volts for long term use) is that you can make sure your system is stable by giving high enough voltage to keep your chip running at your desired speeds, but low enough voltage that you will have decent temperatures. So maybe start with something like 1.3V at the speed you want, and make sure it's stable.

I've been using AIDA64 to test stability, though there were other good tools as well. If your chip is stable for a decent length of time, you can raise the speed and/or lower the voltage and then test again. Once I get a speed and voltage that seem stable with good temps, I run it for 2-3 hours to make sure.

I didn't try my 1600 with the stock cooler, but I know a lot of people get decent overclocks and decent temps with it. A lot depends on your specific chip. Some chips require more voltage for higher speeds, so they run hotter. Only way to know is to try it.

I know that was a lot. If you have any specific questions, let me know. I'm pretty sure Paul's Hardware on YouTube has a good overclocking guide for Ryzen.

As far as monitors go, I kinda went the budget route. I wanted dual monitor, so I went with two $90 BenQ panels. They're good for what they are, but they are 60Hz. With that said, what monitor you get depends on what you want to do. If you want to upgrade your graphics card down the line and play games at high framerates, then get something that's 1080p and 120Hz or 144Hz. If you are content with 60 FPS, you can certainly save some cash by going with something from a good brand (Asus, LG, AOC, Samsung, BenQ are all pretty solid). Try to get an IPS panel, too, as the color reproduction will be better than alternatives. I can't recommend specific models...I just don't know enough about them. But shop around and read/watch reviews And you should be good.

  • 14 months ago
  • 1 point

Here is a RGB fan kit I would go with. It will be more than enough light for that case. For the money it can't be beat. I've used 3 of these kits and they work great. Also you can get on ebay and find them for 29.99 with free shipping as well.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07CGH9CZL/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o04_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

  • 14 months ago
  • 2 points

Thanks for the advice, I probably will be going with these fans. For $30, they are nice.

  • 13 months ago
  • 1 point

Nice! I like the case, looks spacious, good for cable management and expanding in the future.