Description

This build was inspired by this infographic and some encouragement from sub Reddit called r/pcmasterrace . With my laptop starting to show its age from over heating and not being able to keep up with the newer games, I knew I needed an upgrade. And Fallout 4

I chose to use a test bench so I can see my rig and tinker with it easily. The results of this build is a PC that is over clocked to 4.3 GHz. This motherboard is easy to over clock in BIOS. The cooling fan keeps it below 68C at all times.

*Note: When overclocking, the fan automatically runs at 2300 RPM and is quite noisy. Changing the fan speed in BIOS to Silent, makes the fan run at 800 RPM, which is inaudible, and still keeps the temperature below 68C.

Comments

  • 42 months ago
  • 3 points

Thank you for properly orienting your WiFi card's antennas properly.

Way too many people don't understand that aligning all three along the same axis causes cross-interference and the best way to orient them for minimal interference and best all-round reception is by orienting them exactly 90 degrees away from any other antenna, or to put it simply, one along the x-axis, one along the y-axis, and one along the z-axis.

That being said, this orientation doesn't help a ton especially if the router is nearby anyways, but it can help for devices that are bit more distant.

  • 42 months ago
  • 1 point

Thats cool, Iv'e never known that. I have a card with 2 antennas, what would be the most optimal orientation?

  • 41 months ago
  • 1 point

http://image.helipal.com/airy-lp-0118-big001.jpg

This image demonstrates it, the antennas are 90 degrees apart.

Rubber duck antennas (the most common type of antenna used in home electronics) are omnidirectional, meaning they project a signal in all directions (sort of). Each type of antenna has a specific radiation pattern. Here are two images which demonstrate how a rubber duck radiates its signal:

http://people.seas.harvard.edu/~jones/es151/prop_models/dipole.gif http://www.l-com.com/copyrighted_images/pattern_hg2405rd.gif

The antenna basically "fits" into this donut-shaped radiation pattern the same way you'd stick the antenna through the hole of a donut.

Overlapping radiation pattern causes interference and amplification, which is more pronounced at long distances. Think of two vibrating rods in a still pool of water, and the way the ripples from each rod either overlap to amplify or to cancel out. Close to the rods, the water surface isn't too different to the way it'd look if there was just one rod. However, far away there's obvious difference as the ripples are sparser but larger than it would be if there was just one rod.

So you might think then that proper antenna orientation makes a huge difference, then, right? Well, not these days as telecommunication has advanced to where getting adequate reception is possible even when there's some amount of interference. That being said, it does help a bit, sometimes, and can in some cases raise antenna reception quality from 2/4 bars to 3/4 bars, etc.

If you weren't getting reception at all before, proper antenna orientation isn't going to fix it, as it's obvious then that the signal strength isn't good enough to reach the destination (either due to distance or obstacles).

  • 42 months ago
  • 3 points
Looks like a sexy powerful test bench!

+1

  • 42 months ago
  • 2 points

I hope you like cleaning off dust!

+1

  • 42 months ago
  • 2 points

Did you really have to be this mean lol

  • 42 months ago
  • 2 points

Putting it together must have been ridiculously easy with that frame. Slightly jealous.

  • 42 months ago
  • 1 point

I like the open frame

  • 42 months ago
  • 1 point

When the cooler is more expensive than the cpu... ? I don't know why i like it so much, I think it just has character +1

  • 42 months ago
  • 1 point

The cooler is way more expensive than the CPU, I really wanted the duel fan radiator look so I went with this one.

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