Description

This build represents my second 'from scratch' build ever. The prices listed include shipping, handling, and taxes (where applicable), as well as any mail-in-rebates that were available at the time of purchase.

First, some background on my first 'from scratch' build, which started out running Windows 98 and eventually transitioned over to Windows XP 32-bit. It was built back in 2000 and consisted of the following:

  • 1GHz AMD processor with stock heat-sink and thermal paste
  • Abit socket 7 raid motherboard
  • 512MB turbo speed capable DRAM
  • two (one 70GB, one 50GB) IBM Deskstar 7200 rpm HDDs
  • Matrox G450 AGP dual head graphics/video card (with 32MB dedicated video memory)
  • Aureal Vortex 2 SQ2500 sound card
  • NewQ Gold DSP graphic equalizer
  • D-Link fast NIC
  • Kenwood 72x TrueX CD-ROM
  • Yamaha 16x CD burner
  • 3.5" SuperDisk floppy drive
  • several high CFM Sunon cooling fans.

It was a very competitive machine back in its day, and something that I still use to this very day as a dual boot legacy machine (with a few additions such as a PCI-USB controller card, a 3.5" bay flash card reader, an LG DVD burner, etc). The only original component that has ever failed in that build is the Kenwood 72x TrueX CD-ROM drive.

One of the things that I attribute to the overall longevity of my first build is my use (or overuse) of a lot of high quality high CFM cooling fans. Thus, my obsession with component cooling has accordingly carried over to this new build, which is constantly running a total of 7 high CFM fans to keep everything nice and chilly!

The DeepCool UF series of fans are top quality fans (dual ball bearing), run whisper quiet (especially when compared to my old Sunons), and represent an incredible value - I can't recommend them enough! My only regret is that Newegg dropped the price on the 120mm's by $2/ea and on the 140mm's by $2.50/ea a few days after I had purchased them :-( Had I been able to take advantage of those prices, it would have saved me $11 on the build and brought my total spent to within a few dollars of my original $900 target budget.

As you can see in the pics, I'm running the CM Hyper 212 Evo in a push configuration, with case fans in the following configuration: two front 120mm intakes, two rear 120mm exhausts (one in the PSU), one top 140mm intake, and one top 140mm exhaust. All the intakes are running off of the case's three position simple/voltage fan controller (which I constantly leave on the medium setting), while the exhausts (other than the PSU's fan) are running off of the motherboard's PWM headers and controlled by the Asus AI smart controller. I've not seen a monitored temp exceed 32C under load with this arrangement, which I'm extremely satisfied with - especially since the setup is essentially silent for all intent and purposes (the stock cooling fans on my 55" Sony SXRD tv and Mediasonic ProBox are each louder than the 7 combined fans of my new PC)!

As far as storage goes, the reason I only went with a 250GB SSD without any large-volume platter drives mounted in the chassis is because I concurrently built a Mediasonic ProBox loaded with 2 x 4TB Western Digital Purple HDDs that I have connected to my Asus RT-AC68P router, currently giving me 8TB of network storage (the ProBox is expandable up to 32TB). Thus, the internal SSD drive is only used for OS and program hosting, new file acquisition (PVR/DVR), file editing, file conversion/formatting, and temporary storage.

I also converted the case mounted USB 3.0 ports to USB 2.0 ports via an adapter cable for use with the Logitech MK550 wireless keyboard and mouse, as I've read that USB 3.0 can interfere with RF receivers and significantly shorten the usable range of such items. The USB 3.0 ports contained on the NZXT APERTURE M are hooked up to the motherboard's header and function accordingly at full 3.0 speeds. While I wish that the APERTURE M's card reader also functioned at 3.0 speeds, the availability of a SmartMedia (old Olympus flash memory cards) slot made the sacrifice of 2.0 speeds worth it, not to mention that the mesh frame looks great on the build!

Everything else is pretty self explanatory, but if you have any questions, feel free to ask and I'll do my best to answer :-)

Needless to say, I'm very please with this build and am looking forward to at least a decade+ of enjoyment from it. The only things that I might be looking to add to this build in the near future is PCI-e Wi-Fi capability via an TP-LINK Archer T9E and possibly a NOS Razer Barracuda AC-1 sound card that I have, though I'm currently doing just fine using the onboard Realtek gigabit NIC and audio codec.

Enjoy the pics and let me know what you think - I'm fully open to constructive criticism and don't take anything personally :-)

Log in to rate comments or to post a comment.

Comments

  • 59 months ago
  • 4 points

Really nice clean build. Nice parts list. Love those Asus MoBos. I just finished an AMD APU build, but it is not posted yet. Hopefully later today or tomorrow. Keep up the good work.

  • 59 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks!

Likewise, you have several very clean and impressive looking builds of your own (including your prior APU build). Definitely an inspiration to others!

Looking forward to checking out your new build :-)

  • 59 months ago
  • 2 points

Thanks a lot. I appreciate the comments.

https://pcpartpicker.com/b/bFhqqs

[comment deleted]
  • 59 months ago
  • 2 points

Nice build. Many case fans for an A8 ;-) It will freece in it ;D My A10-7800 build has to be happy with to small 6cm case fans, but on a TDP of 65W he comes nearly to the limit.

  • 59 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks!

Always nice to find some support and validation in one's philosophy of valuing exceptional air-flow - your builds are very SWEET and TIGHT!!! I absolutely LOVE your Oldschool, and the NES builds are classically cool :-)

I was seriously contemplating going with the A10-7800 for several weeks while planning this build, but in the end couldn't justify the price differential (even though relatively nominal) upon considering my usage/needs. So far, I'm really quite pleased with the Kaveri APUs - definitely a better bang-for-the-buck vs any of the APU's packing Intel's Iris Pro (and Intel's HD series of on die graphics don't even come close to matching AMD's on die R7 / R9 Radeons).

Thanks for commenting and enjoy your builds as they are definitely top notch!

  • 59 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks too! At first I also wanted to take the A8-7600 but at last I take the A10 because I think to me that the NES has to stay like he is for a long time and the price difference was only 28€ at the time I buyd it. The speed difference is not so much I think. That AMD has the better APU's especially for gaming is also my opinion. In the late 90s I startet with an AMD Athlon Thunderbird, first with 900 then with 1400Mhz ;-) and so I stayed buying AMD CPU's till today.

  • 59 months ago
  • 2 points

........ I thought there will be like 4 R7 240 in Crossfire........ and dual graphics, but nope.

  • 59 months ago
  • 1 point

Ha - yeah, one would definitely naturally think that given the number and power of the fans that I'm running, but to be honest, I really don't have the need for anything other than possibly a dual graphics setup in the future (which would assist the on-die Radeon R7 with encoding, conversion, and formatting tasks). Right now though, I'm looking forward to exploring the full capabilities of the on-die Radeon R7 graphics, which has handled everything that I've thrown at it thus far beyond my expectations.

Note that I'm running the DRAM at 2133MHz in dual channel operation, which is essential for extracting the full performance capabilities from the Kaveri APU lineup. In fact, the Kaveri's on die Radeon R7 graphics definitely out-perform the HD 4600 graphics that came on a pre-assembled Core i7 Haswell based HP Envy PC that I previously used.

  • 59 months ago
  • 2 points

Nice build man! Also, how are those fans as far as noise and airflow?

  • 59 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks!

Regarding the fans - they are extremely nice and probably the best value currently out there IMHO.

I'm a long time Sunon guy when it comes to case/cooler/gpu fans only because of their reputation for long term durability, high CFM, and outstanding value - but they are admittedly very LOUD and I wanted something much more silent for this build.

The DeepCool UF series used in this build are nearly whisper quite when run at medium speed on the case's simple/voltage controller (not sure what the RPMs are at such setting) and the motherboard's PWM controlled headers (which keep the speed at around 900 RPM at idle and up them to an average of 1,200 RPM when under load). Even at a full out 12V and max RPM, they are only about an 1/8th as loud as my comparable Sunons, And while they don't move quite as much air as my Sunons (which are like mini jet turbines or an F5 tornado), they do push quite strong and move a lot of air (I'm guessing that the OEM specs are fairly accurate based on my personal experiences thus far). Also, not sure if it's a benefit of the rubber coating on everything, but they're the smoothest running fans I've ever owned. Not to mention that they're dual ball bearing, which allows for any orientation you desire and is typically a sign of a durable long lasting product - all of the fans (other than the CM fan that came with the Hyper 212 Evo) that I've ever owned have been ball bearing based, and I've yet to ever experience a fan failure. If you can nab them when on sale at Newegg for $7.99/ea for 120mm or $10.49/ea for 140mm, and free shipping, I personally think that they're unbeatable in the value/performance per dollar category.

I personally think that a few would also look fantastic in your build!

Hope that helps :-)

  • 59 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks for the feedback! I will definitely consider adding a few to my pc in the future.

  • 59 months ago
  • 1 point

what kind of fps do you think you are getting on that apu? and What settings? Thanks for any info im looking into a small apu build one day for fun.

  • 59 months ago
  • 1 point

I actually don't game, thus I can't provide you with an answer to that question. However, I can point you to the following link, which you may find helpful: http://www.eteknix.com/memory-scaling-amd-kaveri-a10-7850k-apu/7/.

Best luck!

  • 57 months ago
  • 1 point

This case looks sicker in your photos. Wow! I wanted to know if I am able to throw in a Gygabite GTX 970 G1 and a noctua DH14 in this without having to mod it at all. Will they fit?

  • 56 months ago
  • 1 point

Both should be able to fit without any need for modifications, provided the rest of your component installation is fairly standardized - plenty of room in the case for both!

The case is one of my favorite parts of this build. I love everything about it with one exception - the tool-less 5.25" bay mounting system didn't work for any of the components I loaded them with, thus I simply eliminated the plastic pressure mounting brackets and used good old case screws in their place. A very minor complaint that doesn't change my mind about the case one bit, but thought I'd point it out for a matter of full disclosure and completeness.

I highly recommend this case - especially so if you appreciate the aesthetics of the exterior styling as I do.

Best luck!

  • 53 months ago
  • 1 point

Good Build!

Did you have to update the bios on the motherboard for the cpu? I am planning on building with the same mobo/ cpu combo.

  • 46 months ago
  • 1 point

This looks nice. +1 on your build