Description

Generally I use this for graphic arts, 3D modelling and rendering, genealogy, a small amount of gaming.

Although I've been involved with PC's since the late seventies and up dated all kinds of parts, components, and software this is the very first one I've built from scratch. Most likely it will be the last also. I'm retiring in two months so this will have to last a long time.

Everything worked fine after I got the bugs out of the build. Had some trouble with no boot, but that was entirely my fault. Had, and still have, troubles with over heating. As you can see below, I used the H100 by Corsair. This should be able to handle the CPU, according to what I've read and been told, but so far under a heavy load when rendering a complex scene the temps go to high. Not sure what I've done wrong, but I'll continue to try and sort it out.

I paid about $2100 back between Thanksgiving and Christmas for the parts so that's a bit less than the current going price.

Comments

  • 68 months ago
  • 1 point

Awesome but no cable management

  • 68 months ago
  • 1 point

Yeah, I know. Did the best I could at the time. If I open it up to deal with the cooling I'll try to make it better.

  • 68 months ago
  • 1 point

Hey BronzeDraggon,

I've not used a AMD processor before so unsure of operation temps but 69 underload doesn't sound too drastic under load?

What fan configuration have you got on the radiator of your h100 as I can't see the fans from the pics? Are you pushing or pulling air over the rad?

If you've got room you could try adding more fans for a push pull but I'd check your cpu seating first as qwazyd0gg describe?

Getting the air flow right in the case can do wonders so you want to check that your pulling in and exhausting that hot air and getting those cables out the way can really help to.

The build looks really good so I reckon you can get those temps down :)

  • 68 months ago
  • 1 point

I've used AMDs since back in the DX4-100 days and never had any problems with them.

The fans for the cooler are 2X 120 that came with the cooler. They push air out of the case through the top. A 120 exhaust in the back with a 120 on the right side and a 140 on the fron that both push air in. The case fans are the standard ones that came with the NZXT case.

I have looked at adding two more fans to the cooler, but I wait until they go on sale, and I'll guess I'll have to pull the heat sink and check the paste, but that's not something I'm looking forward to as it's such a ***** to get tightened down. That design really sucks. I design things for a living and would never use such a poor arrangement in one of my projects.

  • 68 months ago
  • 1 point

The fan config sounds perfect to me.

You describe that you have some overheating under load and I've based my responses on the temps you've detailed in the Details section.

I can only compare to the temps I get with the Intel i7 processors that I've used and 69 under load sounds high but an expectable level for any overclock, though I know as rule Intel cpu's do run hotter.

My current rig is a i7 4470k and at a 4.2 overclock my Idle temps are about 31 and on a Prime95 torture test max FFT's I get highs of 79c. This is using a H90 (single 140rad) in push/pull config, stock paste.

My previous rig had an i7 950 which after about three years idles at 38c, with no current overclock, and under the same load has highs of 62c. This has a H80 (single 120rad) in push/pull, stock paste.

I hear you on the design... Most coolers seem to be a pain to get down! My case (HAF X) has the added complication that you have to remove the whole mother board if you want to replace the cooler as you have to put the back bracket on before you lay the mobo down. This is because the cut out window on the rear side of the case is not large enough for an Intel ATX mother board so covers half the coolers bracket (have been very temped to take a junior hacksaw to it!).

Another thing to try (if your not already) is running the pump off a 4pin molex rather than one of the mobo's fan headers? This will doubly ensure your pump runs at full speed all the time, as it should.

  • 68 months ago
  • 0 points

nice system only thing I would suggest is going with the H100I cpu cooler , that ***** will get mad hot in summer with-out a custom loop. I have same cpu and motherboard and I love my rig plays any game flawlessly .

  • 68 months ago
  • 1 point

That may be, but the H100 was the best back when I got it, the "i" didn't exist two years ago. I couldn't get all my parts at the time and then had health and employment problems that put the build on hold. I just couldn't justify spending the extra to replace a brand new part. I'd use use one if I could get for free.

As for this summer, our house is pretty cool, so I have to wait and see.

  • 68 months ago
  • 1 point

I know what you mean , I was supposed to have my 3 monitors and stand already but got put on hold , I added a few more SSDs to my pc and now i have no money left for build . i could share my stuff take 1 of my ram put 8 gb in other pc and i could give it one of my r9 290xs gpu is the costly piece once you have that other parts are reasonably cheap. get 1 or 2 parts a month . but now i want to get my system totally done . pushed my cpu to 4.8 ghz stable and my h100i keeping it cool , im impressed .i cant wait till i get my monitors thinking of just getting 3 24" i`m using a 32 " now but its an old tv hdmi but its 1920X1080P . Playing games you dopnt see the peripheral of these games 3 monitors you will see that and for multi player games you will see enemies first lol

  • 68 months ago
  • 1 point

update your bios to 2301 and you be able to use turbo at just 1 click push your cpu to 4.7 / 4.8 stable and H100 will be ok to cool it. sabertooth is a great board but i want asus to make a motherboard that's got all the trimmings like the intell ones so i can upgrade. The crosshair V formula Z was in right direction. I`m waiting for a board after that one to come out . i want a gamers motherboard :(

  • 68 months ago
  • -1 points

TBH a bad choice of parts, but a nice built system.

1) Shouldn't have gotten a 9xxx Chip, go 8xxx better power to Performance ratio 2) A 2k build with 2 270x's nah ah. Maybe one 280x or 290.

Otherwise a nice build.

  • 68 months ago
  • 2 points

I beg to differ. Dual 270x is a great choice. As you can see, it beats a single 280x with ease and also goes toe to toe and in certain tests can beat a GTX 780 (http://www.reviewstudio.net/868-amd-radeon-r9-270x-crossfirex-and-r9-280x-4-way-crossfirex-review). For your heat issue, check your thermal paste is not to heavy, which is usually the case. From what I can tell, you used your own as per your parts lists so I would certainly check that. Realigning my cooler and using better application methods dropped my temps by a lot and also allowed me to dial in another .2ghz OC while keeping tempts in their appropriate ranges (FX 8320 3.5 OC'd to 4.3 on air cooler running 20ish idle and 40-45 at load). I would also recommend better cable management to help with your air flow from front intake, but other than that it is a great build!

  • 68 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks, those must be same ones I read.

Yes I did use my own, so what application methods do you recommend? I place five very small beads, one in the center and one in each corner. All were only about twenty percent of the single one I've seen used in pictures. I had tried one single one in the center, but when I had to remove the heat sink to correct the no boot problem I had, I saw that what I had placed did not spread out correctly so I thought this would be better.

And as I answered to ITneto above I will see if I can correct the cable management.

  • 68 months ago
  • 1 point

With an AMD CPU, or cpu in general, all the cores that produce heat are all in the center of the processor. There is never really a point to ever cover the entire cpu with paste, especially by putting difference dots or lines accross different locations of the processer. When the lines or dots intersect or connect when you push down the heat sink, or if you manually thin the paste by hand, you can cause air bubbles which can trap heat or hinder the cooling ability of the unit. Just a small dab on the middle of the processor, followed by a good amount of straight and direct pressure on your cooler of choice will result in a thin and evenly spread amount of paste which covers only the necessary location of the cpu. There is such a thing as too much thermal paste. I myself manually thinned mine in a newbie attempt to build a machine and had heat issues. My temps dropped over 20c after proper application. I hope that helps :D

  • 68 months ago
  • 1 point

The 9370 was $10 less than the best 8xxx series on sale at the time.

According the benchmarks I read before buying they indicated that two R9270X would run better than the 280X and I didn't remotely have enough to spring for the 290X.