Description

First gaming computer, budget was $2000. Obviously went a bit over, but I already had the peripherals and the "monitor," which is a television. So far very happy with it, haven't got a game that really pushes its limits though yet, so when my savings account recovers I'll get Crysis for it and answer the age-old question. Pretty happy with all the hardware, except the case. It's good for what it costed, but there are a few issues: I can't figure out how to get the power LED to work, the connection for it on the case does not match the mobo connection. I feel like I'm missing something here? The HDD light doesn't work either, and that connection did match, so I don't know if I did something wrong or if it just doesn't work with SSDs. My biggest problem is not actually the fault of the case, it's my fault, but my CPU cooler is too tall. It would fit in the case if it weren't for the fan on the see-through door, but until I figure out how to take that fan off, or get a different cooler, or a different case, I can't actually put the door on. Other than that, everything is beautiful. I had a lot of fun building this thing and I'm quite happy with all my parts (sans case, which was sort of a placeholder anyway). Want to add one more hard drive to back up to, and a different case.

Comments

  • 85 months ago
  • 11 points

you are using one dim on a quad channel board, and you bought $800 worth of ssd's? what is going on here?

  • 84 months ago
  • 3 points

LOOOOOOOOL

  • 84 months ago
  • 1 point

The ssds were 600 total, and I just wanted to see what ssds were like mostly. I've also got two more 4gb ram but I forgot to put them on the build because I got them for free randomly from a combo deal. I figured ram is easy to upgrade and always planned to add more later anyway, but 8 gb is enough to start.

  • 84 months ago
  • 2 points

if you just wanted to try them then why no just get two 120gb drives and put them in raid zero you could have saved about $500

  • 84 months ago
  • 0 points

Needed the storage. I used to have 300 GB and every time I wanted to install a game I had to uninstall an old one. Got real tired of that.

  • 84 months ago
  • 2 points

you went $500 over budget. thats not a bit over

  • 84 months ago
  • 1 point

It was $300 over, and I didn't feel like waiting to get the second sdd since that would mean having to reinstall everything to set up the raid. Plus work was giving a lot of overtime this summer.

  • 84 months ago
  • 1 point

Hey if you don't want that case, I'll take it, (°u°d). I don't even know if you have a budget, but it looks like getting a different cooler is your better option right about now. Seems like a waste dropping a hundred bucks on another case. Try an allen key or a flat-head screwdriver to pry it off (if the fan is indeed removable). If the fan is secured by rivets and not screws, then taking the fan off doesn't seem like a nice idea - you could crack the window.

  • 84 months ago
  • 1 point

The fan is probably not removable, sadly, which is another reason I'm saving for a new case. Never actually wanted blue LED's (no case ever, apparently, comes with violet LED's installed). Also want a case with usb 3.0 front ports, mostly just because. Other than that this is a great case, especially for the price, and I can't really find another one that's otherwise comparable.

  • 84 months ago
  • 1 point

You could always buy a case with no lighting and upgrade it with purple LED strips, or these 80mm fans. There's quite a few out there, just search for purple LED fans.

  • 84 months ago
  • 1 point

The HDD LED cable could be on backwards. The colored wire is the + and the white wire is the -. The motherboard manual should show you which is which.

As for the power LED, if the cable is 3 pin and the motherboard is 2 pin, just split the connector into 2 and attach it.

Are you doing RAID on the SDD? Which one? I'd like to see some benchmarks. http://www.hdtune.com/

If you're doing raid0, then you certainly want a backup drive. You spent a lot on storage

If you're not using the quad channel ram, and you're not using more than one GPU, why sandy bridge-e?

If you take cost out of the equation, you have good bragging rights anyway. Ram is cheap, get 3 more sticks and take advantage of quad channel.

  • 84 months ago
  • 1 point

The hdd led connector appeared to be labelled and I thought I connected it according to what the mobo instructed, but it's something I'll check again. I have got a raid 0 set up and I've got externals to back up important things, for now. I'll be adding more ram later, that was always the plan, but it's cheap and easy to install so I don't mind tacking it on after the fact. 8 gb seemed enough to start with, my old pc had 6 and ran well enough. As far as why sandy bridge, I picked out the motherboard first before anything else and got attached to it, for purely sentimental reasons.. most every other choice was a compatibility thing. Processor, for instance, was the cheapest I could find that was compatible.

  • 84 months ago
  • 1 point

socket 2011 is certainly the most feature packed. With Ivy Bridge-E supporting the same socket, you have a lot of room to grow. I like this build because you started with the most powerful foundation, and then you can grow into it if/when you need to.

  • 84 months ago
  • 1 point

With a locked CPU, I would have suggested going with a non-OCing MOBO, unless you were going with the Sabertooth strictly for aesthetic purposes (as I did this on my first build). If you wanted a bluetooth/wifi mobo, here:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813130660&nm_mc=AFC-C8Junction&cm_mmc=AFC-C8Junction-_-na-_-na-_-na&AID=10446076&PID=3938566&SID=

MSI's board is hand-tested, great for overclocking, and comes with Bluetooth and Wifi adapter, for a modest $199.

Killer graphics card. I just bought two of these for Xfire config. The Gigabyte and MSI 7970 cards are easily the best, esp for overclocking, and will leave most 670s and 680s in the dust. Good job here.

You were on the right track here, but I think you may have been able to save yourself some money, especially on the mobo.

  • 84 months ago
  • 1 point

I picked the Sabertooth largely because it got excellent customer reviews and seemed like a solidly "safe" choice that I could stay with for a while. There were definitely cheaper options, and for what I need it was probably a bit over the top, but I'm happy with it. I wanted a mobo I could rely on; everything else may get changed out later. If I land face first in a pile of money or something. The bluetooth/wifi adapters were largely an afterthought - just didn't like the idea my 3-year-old laptop could do something the new build couldn't. Stupid reason, I know.

  • 84 months ago
  • 1 point

It's all good! as long as you got what you were looking for out of the build, who cares what anyone thinks??! Congrats :P

  • 84 months ago
  • 0 points

Dis is da good build, i wish i could have as much monay as you as you