Description

This build is my current setup, probably going to upgrade once a next gen replacement of the 690 comes out :D the 2 HDD's are currently in RAID0 configuration for a free speed boost for storage. There are currently 2x GTX660Ti's in this rig which enable me to reach 120 fps for my screen and 3D gaming.

Comments

  • 79 months ago
  • 1 point

Why is your ram placed like that in the picture? when it says you have x4 or am i missing something good build tho. Damn dem noctua fans are expensive. And How's that SSD? And damn that's a good OC, any problems? Mouse flickering, Freezing? Anything? What's your Vcore at? seems like a really low temp for a 4.8 oc, because on my OC at 4.7 it's 65-70 under full load (Vcore at 1.325)And btw is that fan controller good saw some review about it being good but it had some problems with the touch? Is it worth getting?

  • 79 months ago
  • 1 point

Is that a prime95 or intel burn test load temp for that CPU? If it is, that's oddly impressive, if not I should like to know what your intel burn test load temp is.

  • 79 months ago
  • 1 point

Hey guys the RAM sticks are like that becuase i took them before i found out that it wasnt quad channel... i moved it as soon as i found out (about 2 days before the pictures i took) the ram is currently clocked to 2400ghz 16gb dual channel, ALSO the monitor isnt the same as my current one, i couldnt find the monitor i have listed on the 2 sites it gave me to choose from so i picked the closest one to it, its a 120HZ 2ms 27" display with 3D it also came with glasses so it was a great deal! my vcore is currently set at 1.450V and man if anything in this case has blown me away its the water block... i mean seriously this block has astounded me and surpassed my expectations in cooling ability, i opted out of using the stock fans with it however for a couple of noctua 120mm 1600RPM fans optimised for air flow in a push pull config, i used the fans that came with it for general flow intake at bottom of case and exhaust at top :). The case is HORRIBLE for cable management but it was a cheap option at the time so yeah :) ill find a link of my actual monitor if you are interested :)

  • 79 months ago
  • 1 point

Even so, you might want to check your manual to find out what way to install them to take advantage of dual channel. It is usually alternating RAM slots for dual channel RAM. So if you number your RAM slots from left to right, you should put your RAM in the 1 and 3 position, or the 2 and 4 position. I've almost never seen a motherboard with dual channel RAM where you put it in the 1 and 2 position or the 3 and 4 position. You might want to check your manual to make sure you have it in the right slots.

  • 79 months ago
  • 1 point

I don't have experience with this specific MB but I know the Gigabyte GA-Z77X-UP4 has the slots positioned so that the ram appears to be in 1 and 2 position, when it is actually in the 1 and 3 positions. Threw me for a loop when I was putting together my build. I thought I had a bad MB or stick of RAM because I was putting it in the wrong slot.

It all boils down to: check your manual to make sure you have it in the right slots. :)

Edit: as stated by another poster, the memory is in the wrong slot. It needs to be in A1 B1 or A2 B2

  • 79 months ago
  • 1 point

Also I use AIDA64 for benchmarks and stability tests, and I think I got lucky with my CPU, ive heard alot of people talking about different results with their ivy bridge processor not performing as well as others also I've also heard you can take the aluminium shield off the cpu and apply a better quality thermal paste for much better results but I cant confirm this and its also a risky procedure.

  • 79 months ago
  • 1 point

the SSD isn't that good for price... this beats it in speed, price and amount 8gb more :3 http://pcpartpicker.com/part/a-data-internal-hard-drive-asx900s3128gmc

  • 79 months ago
  • 2 points

I made this build about 2 months ago and also, the price I paid for the SSD was pretty reasonable as it was on sale. btw I bought my parts from MSY not PCCG, prices are much better!

  • 79 months ago
  • 1 point

Biggest problem I see, besides that leftover PSU, is the RAM.

On page 13 of the manual (link below) it shows the board layout and you have both modules in the "B" slots" and you need them staggered, using A1/B1 or A2/B2. You're not running dual channel (according to how your RAM is configured in the pics).

http://download.asrock.com/manual/Z77%20Extreme4-M.pdf

Also noticed the RAM is 1.6V and CAS 11. Anything past 1866 is really a waste of money and you can cause stability issues with that voltage. I'd get two dual channel 1.5V kits @ 1866 or even 1600 (memory spec of i7).

  • 79 months ago
  • 1 point

As I said earlier, These pictures were taken before I knew it was dual channel, so far after 3 months of use I have had no stability issues whatsoever, Id consider myself lucky tbh hahaha :)

  • 79 months ago
  • 1 point

Glad the RAM is working out for you, was only confused because you said you moved the RAM 2 days before the pics you took, so I think everyone thought the configuration in the pics is how you left it but I assume you have all 4 slots filled now. CAS could be better, and many people use RAM up to 1.65V with no problems but you are overvolting the i7 memory controller so as long as it works for you, yes you are lucky.

  • 79 months ago
  • 1 point

The noctua fans are ugly and expensive, but they work soooo well.

  • 79 months ago
  • 0 points

Decent build. Are you using 2x4GB or 4x4GB?

Wish I could have warned you about the case. I have the same one and it is horrible for cable management. I wish I would have spent a little more on the case.

Is 620W enough for a 3770k overclocked and 2x660ti? Kinda seems like your cutting it close.

Cool monitor.

  • 79 months ago
  • 1 point

I have the same case situation.

  • 79 months ago
  • 0 points

620 watts is enough. It leaves him room to overclock everything as well.

  • 79 months ago
  • 0 points

Cutting it close is probably the right term. He's probably at around 500w or so. Given 620w won't actually put out 620w at an 80% efficiency level he'll be seeing JUST under 500w with that PSU.

Without the overclock he'll be fine. With the overclock, I suspect at full load he might see some issues.

  • 79 months ago
  • 1 point

You're calculating it wrong. PSUs always put out their rated power if they are good PSUs. The efficiency rating tells you how much you are actually pulling from the wall. So if your PSU is rated at 620W, that's how much it is giving your computer. If it is a 80 plus like this one, then it is really pulling around 775 from the wall.

That being said, he is kind of pushing it with 660tis and a 3770K. You never want to push your PSU at its max for hours at a time.

  • 79 months ago
  • 1 point

It's worth to mention that most quality power supply companies show their power supplies continues wattage, what is often 20-30% below the peak wattage!

Plus a builder who I know, uses 520W Antec PSU for two GTX660Tis, which are in SLI obviously.

  • 79 months ago
  • 1 point

Yeah, I didn't mean maximum as in peak. I meant the maximum of their rated power. Most good/great PSUs can give their rated power 24/7, but when you take into account wear and tear over the years, even the great PSUs don't keep their rated power over the years.

Just because you know someone who uses it, doesn't mean it is a good idea. I don't think 660tis in SLI use 500W by themselves, but when you overclock them and you overclock an i7 3770K, you can be getting close to that amount because these components use a lot more wattage when overclocked than when at stock. A system with an overclocked 3770k with no video cards uses 250watts by itself (http://www.bit-tech.net/hardware/2012/04/23/intel-core-i7-3770k-review/8). When you are adding in two 660tis which might be overclocked themselves, you are getting pretty close to 520W if you overclock everything, if not exceeding it. You can probably stress a great power supply to 100% of its rated power supply for days/weeks/months at a time, but it's not a good idea to do it consistently over the years. Eventually the voltage regulation won't be as good and you could get a voltage that fries everything in your computer.

  • 79 months ago
  • 1 point

I completely agree with whole PSU and cutting it close, I had this PSU left over from some other builds and I will probably upgrade to a much higher one when I do some upgrades :)

EDIT: Also I had to put my GPU's at stock clock speeds for stability reasons but as this wasnt letting the rig down it didnt really phase me :D

[comment deleted]
  • 79 months ago
  • 1 point

The number listed isn't a peak rating anymore. That's how it used to be, but the newer PSUs rate it as what is equivalent to RMS power on audio amplifiers. The great/good ones are rated for continuous power at their advertised power at a certain temperature. The great ones use real world temps and the bad ones use temps that you would never get in the real world

Once again, efficieny and rated power are two different things when it comes to PSUs. Efficiency is how much wattage the PSU gives to the computer in relation to how much it pulls from the wall. Rated power is how much wattage a PSU can give to the computer over time. The great PSUs can give their rated power 24/7 regardless of whether they are being stressed 50% of their rated power or 100% of their rated power. Sure the efficiency gets a little worse or better depending on load, but most good/great PSUs can still deliver their rated power if being stressed at 90-100% of their rated power. If you look at johnnyguru and hardwaresecrets reviews they do test on whether the power supply gives their rated power and then they look at efficiency. The neo ecos weren't rated for max 620w. They were rated to give 620W continuous.

  • 79 months ago
  • 1 point

They're starting to do that with audio amps now too. Advertise them with RMS ratings instead of peak. Which is nice. Guess I'm just not used to that yet.