Description

Introduction: Made for LAN Parties and college education applications. My requirements then meant that it had to be small and portable, yet still be able to handle graphics cards meant for gaming and be fairly cheap.

Requirements: Budget, USB3.0 capable, small form factor, portable, upgradeable, ability to handle other tasks such as music/photo/video editing

Parts Breakdown:

CPU: The Intel Core i5-4590 is a 4th Gen. Haswell quad core, and since this is supposed to be for running music/photo/video editing, running IDE's and various other programming programs (kek) as well as gaming, 4 cores is great for this. With the LGA 1150 socket, I can upgrade to an i7 easily. With mITX AMD mobos, the only socket is an FM2/+, which is essentially a dead socket.

Motherboard: It has USB3.0, wifi capability, and is Mini ITX. It has an LGA 1150 socket and it's one of the cheaper ones. Not much more you can ask for.

RAM: 8 gb is enough for a 64 bit OS and enough for gaming purposes. The mobo won't support more than two DDR3 sticks, so upgrading may be a bit of a hassle.

Storage: Cheap and large. That's about it. SSDs are still in their "beta" phase, barely just making it on the market and in fairly small sizes. You can buy one to upgrade the size, but for now an HDD is good enough for our purposes.

GPU: in this price range, there are two cards to consider. On the nVidia side, there's the 750 Ti SC/FTW. On the AMD side, you have the R9 270x. While both are similarly priced and have similar performance, I chose the R9 270x because it is just slightly more powerful and has the Never Settle Ruby Reward program in place. Once that expires however, it would be best to use the 750 Ti. But for now, the 270x has slightly better performance and 4 free games going for it.

Case: The Core V1 is a very spacious case while still keeping that mITX size, and it has USB3.0 headers.

PSU: At 600W, it's enough to be future proof.

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Comments

  • 62 months ago
  • 1 point

not a beast

  • 62 months ago
  • 1 point

Probably should've went with a different PSU brand, Thermaltake isn't well known for PSUs for a reason.

  • 62 months ago
  • 1 point

I actually kind of regret buying a non-modular PSU in general, there's a lot of unused cabling that's just tucked away in the bottom compartment of the Core V1.

  • 62 months ago
  • 1 point

Yeah modular PSUs are a pretty much must have as they aren't really expensive over non-modular. And next time (you might even want to change them out soon) with a more reputable PSU brand like Corsair, Antec, EVGA, XFX, SeaSonic, etc.

  • 62 months ago
  • 1 point

two words for you: Cable Management!!!

  • 62 months ago
  • 2 points

Try managing cables in a case that's less than 11x11x11 inches. If the PSU was modular it would be much cleaner but in it's current state there's not much Ican do.

  • 47 months ago
  • 1 point

Nice, I got the same case wrapped in carbon fiber vinyl !