Description

CPU: Intel Core 4790 3.8gHz OC GPU: ASUS GTX 960 Turbo OC Ram: HyperX Fury 4gb x2 MB: ASUS B85-PRO GAMER HDD: Segate 1TB SSD: Kingston HyperX 120gb

Intel #4790 #ASUS #GTX #960 #Turbo #OC #B85 #SSD #HDD #HyperX #CSGO #GamingPC

Comments

  • 48 months ago
  • 2 points

Just so everyone knows about the power supply,

http://www.hardocp.com/article/2014/03/18/raidmax_cobra_power_500w_supply_review/2#.Vp1H_lI4fBw

The power information for the Raidmax Cobra Power 500W is exactly what we would expect from a power supply that first saw light in 2008. Indeed, with the 12v rail only having a capacity of 32A (or up to ~77% of the unit’s total possible capacity if necessary) this unit seems positively antiquated. The minor rails, however, are not as skewed with a total cap of 100W and each rail is individually capable of 20A.

http://www.hardocp.com/article/2014/03/18/raidmax_cobra_power_500w_supply_review/3#.Vp1F21I4fBw

The heatsinks are rather small on this unit compared to what is available from Andyson and the fan used to cool this unit is a ShenZhen Poweryear Electronics Co., Ltd (Poweryear) sleeve bearing fan rated at 0.28A at 12v. The PCB itself is sparsely populated and single layer with an ugly soldering job. This is most pronounced on the secondary near the 12v rails where these look almost bridged. Things are not looking so good right now.

After all is said and done, the input filtering stage is short of being complete. We also see that the bridge rectifier found here is sans heatsink.

Moving over to the secondary of the Cobra Power 500W, we see an old, sparse, poorly populated secondary. The heatsink here houses the power components for the secondary and just in front of it are the pair of coils paired with the power components. The capacitors found on this side appear to be all JunFu's; yikes! We also see, back towards the front edge of the PCB, that the protection circuitry is not complete on this unit.

http://www.hardocp.com/article/2014/03/18/raidmax_cobra_power_500w_supply_review/7#.Vp1G81I4fBw

the Transient Load Tests are the first set of results that really go askew to land in the awful category. For instance, when each rail was directly loaded, the 12v rail showed a peak change of ~560mV and the 5v rail had a peak change of ~240mV. The unloaded 5v peak change during the 12v load was ~180mV. True this unit is just 500W in capacity, but those values are just huge even for a 500W unit. Not only are these changes very large in magnitude, the 12v rail even drops out of the ATX12v specification when directly loaded in the Test #1.

Ripple is actually decent.

  • 48 months ago
  • 1 point

I like this build a lot! Well done! :) +1

  • 48 months ago
  • 1 point

Tnx

  • 48 months ago
  • 1 point

MM rank?

[comment deleted by staff]