Description

Major build objectives/notes:

1) Low Thermal Footprint - The system needs to be able to run at full processor speeds, both cpu and video, without overheating, even when the ambient temperature is 100F.

  • The system will be situated in a top floor apartment and needs to be able to handle the heat when gaming.

  • Liquid cooling ensures that there is very little thermal bleed in to the case itself which prevents the interior air temperature from rising to the point it triggers the emergency temp shutdown feature of the motherboard during the hot summer months.

2) Cable Management - The system case's interior needs to be open with minimum exposed wiring to ensure constant airflow.

  • The Corsair 760T's interior is more spacious than would be expected and its right side panel opens up to reveal a very roomy backpanel area for placing cables which can then be routed through any of the five rubber gasket lined pass through openings.

  • This combined with the hinged (but easily removable) fully transparent side panel and ample mounting points for liquid cooling radiators makes the 760T perfect for this build.

3) Airflow - The system interior must have strong airflow while not also sounding like a tornado.

  • As this build did not need the two preinstalled 3 bay hard drive racks one was removed to improve airflow.

  • The video card radiator's single 120mm fan pushes air out of the back of the case and was mounted after removing the preinstalled 140mm exhaust fan. Note that this rear facing fan will expel air that can get quite hot. The area behind the system should be kept clear with at least 6" between the back of the case and the wall. Pushing the case back up against the wall will cause a hot spot to build up at the fan's exhaust site which can then bleed over to the radiator diminishing its ability to cool the video processor and cause overheating.

  • The cpu radiator's dual 140mm fans push air out through the top of the case. The case comes with a smooth top panel which is attached to the cabinet magnetically. This panel was easily removed (as intended by the manufacturer) to allow airflow through the top grill of the case.

  • Two 140mm front mounted intake fans which come standard with the case pull air inward and are protected with a removable lint guard panel which is easily cleaned. The removal of the panel is simple - push in on the panel and you'll hear a click and the panel will pop off thanks to a spring in the case. Placing it back on to the case is just as easy - slot the bottom in to the case then push the upper portion of the panel in until it clicks.

  • The bottom of the case has an open grill where an additional fan could be placed but this spot is left open allowing the case to passively suck in cool air from floor level. Placing an additional fan at this location would provide no extra cooling benefit and is unneeded due to the way the case and fans are being set up.

  • The mostly unobstructed case interior coupled with the radiator fans and case fans create sufficient airflow through the case to maintain an interior temperature which is actually lower than the ambient temperature. The system is also remarkably quiet and runs almost silently even while gaming.

4) Virtual Reality Ready - The build must exceed current recommended specifications for the Oculus Rift.

  • The GTX 980 Ti 6GB card should have no problems delivering a smooth jitter free VR experience and thanks to the liquid cooling can operate at 100% capacity for extended periods of time with no thermal issues.

  • The minimum recommended processor is an i5 4590 but Oculus strongly suggests that new builds use the i5 6400.

  • Oculus focuses on single processor performance which is why it recommends the i5. However, the RIft will work just as well with the new i7-6700K which runs at 4GHz before overclocking. The i7 is used in this build as it will be used often as a media and content server as well as for transcoding video while performing other tasks simultaneously, such as gaming.

  • The Rift requires three 3.0 USB ports and one 2.0 USB port in order to work. That is a lot of USB ports that need to be dedicated to the Rift. Oculus understands that not every computer will have four open USB ports and recommends the use of a PCI-Express expansion card. Although any card that uses the Fresco Logic FL1100EX chipset should work there is only one Oculus recommended card - the Inateck USB 5 port expansion PCI-E card (model number KTU3FR-5O2U) which is used in this build.

5) Appearance - The system should look good, clean, and professional.

  • The Corsair case is a great start and looks amazing compared to the majority of other cases out there. The use of the cable pass through points inside gives the system a nice visual presentation.

  • Interior lighting is provided by two sticky backed purple LED strips. One is mounted at the top of the case alongside the grill vent on the windowed side panel side. The second is mounted on the inside of the front panel running from top to bottom on the side closest to the windowed side panel.

Comments

  • 47 months ago
  • 1 point

Lovely build! Love the purple.

  • 47 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks Ae. I wasn't sure how it would look when I ordered the lighting but I'm very happy with the results.

  • 47 months ago
  • 1 point

Amazing description! Build looks great and probably functions great. +1

  • 47 months ago
  • 1 point

I'm glad you liked it. I added its Fire Strike score to the photos section. I was hoping to hit 13k but it actually exceeded my expectations at 15k and change.

  • 47 months ago
  • 1 point

sweet build +1.

How the motherboard, run into any problems with it?

looking to get the same one.

  • 47 months ago
  • 2 points

The motherboard itself is excellent - the BIOS though can be dangerous. It lets you change just about every setting there is and if you muck about in it without being absolutely sure you understand what you are changing you can easily render the system unbootable. Easy to fix though and start over from default.

I like the board - the best feature I think is the two digit display in the upper right hand corner. It displays codes (which you can look up the meaning of in the manual if you need to) as it boots up and runs showing you not only what phase of boot its in but also errors if there are any. I had it get hung up at one point and the code pointed me towards memory timing which I had entered incorrectly.

Overall it has lots of nice bells and whistles which you don't absolutely have to have but are great once you have them.

  • 47 months ago
  • 1 point

I really like this build, well done.

  • 47 months ago
  • 1 point

Looks really really nice! That case looks sweet.

  • 47 months ago
  • 2 points

Thanks. After using this case I will never use any other. It's well worth the money.

  • 47 months ago
  • 1 point

Love this build but one thing the GPU radiator NEEDS to be flipped I made the same mistake with my 980 Ti Hybrid. I realized out of nowhere and i flipped it the GPU pump sucked all the water after i flipped it. btw that my favorite case really good build.

  • 46 months ago
  • 1 point

I've tried both orientations and the one you recommend actually made the card run roughly 2 degrees hotter.

  • 46 months ago
  • 1 point

Hey man I know you posted this a little while ago, but do you remember what LEDs you used? I'm planning on getting some purple LEDs so I've been looking at people's builds and asking what they used. Your build especially caught my eye!

  • 45 months ago
  • 1 point
+ 3 for color scheme (purple and white)  1- for graphics card you could of got a better graphics card for less money (gtx 980 ti amp extream) great build (^o^)
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