Description

Affectionately named after the AI from the Halo series thanks to my lifelong love of that franchise, this PC was my first "true" build. Originally built it back in May 2014, and it's gone through several changes since then.

When first built in May, I used a Hyper 212 EVO as the HSF, as well as a refurbished EVGA 580, as I was trying to keep costs down as much as possible at the time. Thanks to Micro Center's combo deals CPU and mobo were pretty cheap, and working at a computer hardware store got me a decent discount on sever other parts at the time (for example, a used optical drive we had lying around the tech bench for a dollar). I also used an old 32" TV, along with a cheap Logitech keyboard/mouse combo, to start off with to further save money. I think in all the original build was right around the $900 mark, maybe slightly under. The CPU I was able to overclock to 4.2GHz using the 212 EVO, which was respectable for being my first attempt at overclocking. Not bad for a $25 cooler.

For the next few months after that I added the two BenQ monitors as well as the keyboard, mouse, and speakers. Around November/December I got the MX100, 970, and Noctua. Having been promoted to a computer repair technician before then, I found my original cable management to be disgusting and reworked it a little bit as I installed the new components. With the new Noctua in place I was able to bump up the overclock to 4.8GHz. At this point I don't think it'll run much higher, as I'm at about 1.525V already and don't have much more thermal room to work with without adding additional fans or cranking up the fan speeds on my current ones, which I'd rather not do considering that I do a fair bit of recording work and the extra noise would be unwelcome for that.

In the future I may consider adding another 8GB of RAM, as well as maybe switching the 970 out with a 980, if I can get a deal on one at work, but for the most part I'm pretty happy with it as-is.

It's probably not my favorite-looking build amongst all the ones I've built for customers while working as a tech (that honor goes to a i7-4790k + GTX 980 build in a Corsair 230T Grey/Blue case, the somewhat-foggy glass looked fantastic with a cold cathode and blue-LED fans added in to the case), but it's served me well so far and I definitely have no regrets :)

Comments

  • 58 months ago
  • 1 point

Nice AMD build

  • 58 months ago
  • 3 points

I would call it an AMD build if the GPU was also an AMD.

  • 58 months ago
  • 1 point

Generally speaking, (I thought I was told a long time ago that) whatever the CPU / board combo was, the computer was. AMD CPU & chipset, AMD build.

[comment deleted]
  • 58 months ago
  • 1 point

I mean, I have an AMD CPU and an Nvidia GPU, but I just wouldn't call it an AMD build. But the 870 is definetly nice.

  • 58 months ago
  • 1 point

870??

  • 58 months ago
  • 1 point

Yeah, totally not a typo m8.

  • 58 months ago
  • 1 point

Unfortunately I don't have $500-600 lying around for a 290X (or a 980, though they were hard to find in our store at the time since the 900 chips had just hit the shelves). Hard to beat 780-level performance for under $350.

  • 58 months ago
  • 1 point

The 4GB 290x averages about $320 now and the 8GB version I have seen for $450

  • 58 months ago
  • 1 point

Nice build with solid upgrades. I would definitely consider more RAM, but 8 should be adequate.

  • 58 months ago
  • 1 point

I'm considering upgrading to 16GB Trident X at some point, at the moment though 8's been plenty for what I usually run.

  • 58 months ago
  • 1 point

Yeah, 8GB is enough for gaming. I had 16, I'm going to split it off into another build (that I'll post in a few days).

  • 53 months ago
  • 1 point

Hey i like your build and that really cool black theme!!! And i have a few questions to ask about your build: 1. Hows the motherboard working and did you overclock??? 2.If you did overclock do you think that this can handle a 4.8ghz overclock on the 8320 or 8320e and have a 2 way crossfire???

  • 52 months ago
  • 1 point

No real complaints with the board thus far. Obviously it won't handle overclocking as well as something like a Crosshair or its higher-end cousins (UD5/UD7) but it's been pretty solid for a board that lists around $120. It is one of the earlier revisions though, and I have heard that some people have had issues with throttling caused by the VRM with one of the newer revisions (3.0, if I remember correctly). Never ran into that issue myself though, even with overclocking.

The 8320 I have running at 4.8GHz at just under 1.525 volts, been running it at that for about six months now and it's still stable. Not sure how it would hold up if Crossfire was added to the mix since I generally avoid SLI/Crossfire when I can help it - I would normally rather buy a single high-end card than deal with the driver issues and incompatibility generally associated with multi-GPU technology.

  • 52 months ago
  • 1 point

Oh ok so no crossfire. But if am trying to get to 4.8 on the 8320 should i get this???:

https://pcpartpicker.com/part/asus-motherboard-m5a99fxpror20

OR

https://pcpartpicker.com/part/asrock-motherboard-990fxextreme9

OR

https://pcpartpicker.com/part/gigabyte-motherboard-ga990fxaud3r5

By the way i plan to do a custom loop and overclock(to 4.8ghz).

  • 51 months ago
  • 1 point

Haven't had much experience with the ASRock board personally but I'm managing 4.8 stable on the Gigabyte UD3 right now and I've normally had good luck with ASUS boards - their higher end boards are usually solid as a rock and their top-of-the-line boards (Crosshair, Sabertooth) are considered some of the best options for overclocking.

I'd probaly lean towards the ASUS board of the three you mentioned, think it holds up better than the other two in terms of reliability considering the shakiness of the new revisions of the UD3's VRM - I believe it was only revision 3.0 that had the issue so might be fine but I've also heard one or two reports of similar issues with revision 4.0 which gives me pause with any of the newer versions of that board.

Especially with the ASUS board being cheaper after rebates right now, I'd lean in that direction personally.

Also worth mentioning that it's not always a guarantee you can hit high overclocks with 8320's. Generally AMD uses higher-quality silicon the more expensive the chip, so generally 8350's are more likely to be capable of better overclocks (though that's not always the case). I think with CLLC you should have a good chance of hitting 4.8 (if not higher) unless you get really unlucky with the chip, though.

  • 58 months ago
  • 1 point

nice build :) noctua coolers work great on builds like this

  • 58 months ago
  • 1 point

Builds gaming PC, names it after something from an Xbox game.

  • 58 months ago
  • 2 points

Halo was originally written for PC by Bungie; it was going to be their first big PC game. (They started out as a Mac-only developer; their big FPS on Mac was called Marathon.) Microsoft bought them to get the game and have it ported to Xbox. If I remember correctly Halo for PC didn't come out until AFTER Halo 2 on Xbox, and it was a port (dumbed-down version) of the first Xbox version, not an update of the original PC version. The same for Halo 2 on PC; a crap port of the Xbox version.

  • 58 months ago
  • 1 point

To be fair, the first two Halos were also ported to PC.

  • 58 months ago
  • 1 point

Could get Windows 10, it has Cortana.

  • 58 months ago
  • 1 point

There's also that windows phone with Cortana!

  • 58 months ago
  • 1 point

how did you get that mobo for 35 bucks?

  • 58 months ago
  • 1 point

Microcenter combo deals. Ended up being like $120-130 for CPU and mobo together iirc.

  • 57 months ago
  • 1 point

nice AMD build but i think u can build more performance pc under $1500