Description

This was my first time purchasing parts and building a PC on my own, and was partly payed for by my parents as an early Christmas present. I bought this during Black Friday sales, and paired it with parts and peripherals I already had. This is going to be used mostly for gaming and I will be taking it to college next year.

CPU: My previous build had an AMD Athlon 7750 Black Edition, and it has always been reliable. This cpu was a pretty good deal in my opinion, and it works perfectly fine. I also chose it because this generations consoles all have AMD cpus. The Stock fan is not that great, and is pretty loud, and is the only problem I have with it.

Motherboard: I've never used gigabyte before, but I do like the bios and it works well. The only complaint I have is that there aren't as many fan connectors as I would like.

Memory: I had never even heard of G.Skill, but this RAM had fantastic ratings, and the price was right. It was very easy to set the timings, and It looks pretty nice.

Storage: I've always heard good things about the Barracuda, and they were all correct. I've only used WD before, but this hard drive is on par if not better than the WD blacks I have used. Boot time is pretty fast.

Case: I really like this case, from the screws holding on the sides, to the removable drive cage. The only issue I have with it is that the cable routing hole for the 8 pin power cord is not large enough to fit it through. The fans it came with are alright, and I moved the blue led one to the top of my case.

Power Supply: I know it looks like I'm over compensating, but for the price, it was cheaper than the usually cheaper PSU's, and I'm all for future proofing. The semi-modular aspect is extremely nice, but the non modular cords are simply too short to use the case grommets, but it's not that big of deal to me.

Everything else I already owned. The wireless adapter and the monitor are not what I have, but they are close enough. I also have a logitech keyboard with FN media controls and chiclets keys.

I currently have in my possession 240$ for upgrades. Things I am looking at as a possibility to upgrade are my

GPU: I've always used nvidia, but I have heard that AMD are currently best bang for the buck. If I go with this I can then sell my 560ti on craigslist for probably around 100$

Storage: Any SSD that is 120GB or 240GB that is fast for the price for me to put Win7 and frequently used games and programs

Keyboard: to a full size mechanical with media controls

Monitor: to something 1080p

Case Fan: A 140mm fan for the top of my case would be nice to help keep things cooler

CPU Cooler: If I opt out of the 140mm fan, I wouldn't mind having a closed loop liquid cooler for my CPU with a radiator on top

Any help with my upgrades would be greatly appreciated. Thanks for reading.

Comments

  • 71 months ago
  • 3 points

A few things:

  • First, your CPU idle temp is just plain wrong, unless you've got the PC in a fridge. Your idle temp cannot be lower than the ambient room temperature.

  • You could tidy up that cable management a bit. For example; route the 24-pin mobo cable to the back and then back out front right by where it plugs into the board. You can find quite a few helpful videos about this on YouTube.

  • AMD has some great GPUs out right now, but there are a couple things to keep in mind. Mainly, AMD can't design a cooler for ****, so if you end up saving some more money and getting a 290 or 290x you'll probably want an aftermarket cooler or wait for some non-reference cards to come out to get the most out of the card. At your current budget of $240 you're probably going to end up with a 270x or a GTX 760. Both of which are pretty good cards.

  • Lastly, for CPU coolers, I'd probably go with the NZXT Kraken X40 if you want to utilize that 140mm fan slot. It's not cheap, but it performs roughly on par with its 240mm rivals.

Not a bad first build, and it has a lot of potential. I'm curious to see how it turns out.

  • 71 months ago
  • 1 point

I'm using HWMonitor and looking at the package temps. That's a really good point, but it's what it says. Should I be worried about the highs being shown as lower than they actually are?

  • 71 months ago
  • 3 points

I did a bit of research for you, and from what I've found FX-8320s and 8350s have a bad algorithm for monitoring their idle temps. Just look at any non-overclocked 8320 on this site. Almost all of them apparently idle below 15*C (with the blue ribbon going to someone who's CPU idles at 4C :/).

Load temps are apparently displayed correctly though, so you're probably good.

  • 71 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks!

  • 71 months ago
  • 1 point

Yep, as ESPM said, the R9 270x or the GTX 760 is the best bang for you buck

  • 71 months ago
  • 2 points

like what ESPM400 says, FX-series CPUs have temperature sensors that are inaccurate at any temperature below 45C due to how they've decided to implement thermal sensing. this causes idle reports to be confusing and wildly inaccurate, but at load the readings will be darn-near accurate.

being an FX owner myself, i have found a simple work-around: if you want to take your idle temperature, take it at the socket sensor. right now, my FX-8350 believes it's idling at around 10C, but a sensor at the socket reads a much more appropriate 30C (it's fairly cool where i'm at).

  • 71 months ago
  • 2 points

not a bad setup at all. my only complaint is to tidy up those cables to make it look nicer.

as far as upgrades is concerned, stepping up to an R9 270X or GTX 760 would be a good idea. anything higher than a 270X on the AMD side is a no-no primarily because the 'coin miners are sucking up all the local stock and driving the prices up. if you're gonna sell your GTX 560 Ti, consider a GTX 770.

if you decide against ditching your GTX 560 Ti (wonderful GPU despite its age), the 120GB Kingston SSDNow V300 is only $70; then you can buy that, an inexpensive 1080p monitor, and an inexpensive air cooler like a Hyper 212 EVO. i don't know how 4+1 power phases would hold out on overclocking an eight-core FX CPU, so i would reserve a liquid loop for when it'd be placed on a more overclocking-friendly motherboard like the GA-990FXA-UD3.

in any case, i hope you have fun with your upgrades!

  • 71 months ago
  • 2 points

I'll work on the cables soon. I love my 560Ti, and it has definitely stood the test of time, but with the new console generation and all these fantastic games coming out (I'm looking at you The Division) I feel the need to upgrade. I'll probably go with the 760, and an SSD (the V300 has had some issues with firmware lately so I'll probably stick with the Samsung evo).

  • 71 months ago
  • 1 point

I'd wait on buying any AMD GPUs at the moment. Prices have gone up from people buying the high end R9 series GPUs in bulk for bitcoin mining. Even Newegg is bundling AMD GPUs at lower prices just for miners. Literally though, I saw a picture of a guy who bought about 108 GPUs just for it. Just hold out for prices to ease back down. Unless you're planning on overclocking I wouldn't get a water cooler for your FX-8320. If you just want to ensure it stays cool or even want to bump a small overclock you should grab a normal cooler like the Hyper 212 EVO or something that's relatively cheap but good. The FX-8320 will operate fine as long as you don't exceed 60 degrees. If you grab that cooler it would allow you to push the FX-8320 up to the 8350's stock clock of 4.0 GHz without issues on cooling. If you're unfamiliar with overclocking it's relatively easy, just read on a few guides and pay attention. Overall nice build though, you should look into grabbing that new GPU when you get a 1080p capable monitor if you care about visuals. Your GPU may fall a bit behind on intensive games. Once the AMD prices go down you should look into the AMD R9 270X, it's priced very well when supply and demand isn't in the way.

  • 71 months ago
  • 1 point

You would be right on the cooler. I got this build mixed up the SFF build 'Polyglot' two builds down. If there are no plans on overclocking your rig, just stick with a nice and cheap air cooler. However, if you want to OC the rig, that Kraken is a great buy.

  • 71 months ago
  • 1 point

Yeah I was just saying if he wants to keep it cool while doing a small bump to match the FX-8350 the EVO should be fine. I'm not sure his experience with overclocking though.

  • 71 months ago
  • 1 point

I have none currently. How much of a difference will I see when gaming? I've just never been sure it would be worth the hastle.

  • 71 months ago
  • 2 points

Depends on the games you play, if you play CPU intensive games like Arma 2 and 3 then you will see a jump in FPS. Normally most games are GPU intensive. No need for a liquid cooler yet if you aren't exploring overclocking. Liquid cooling is usually for when you're stepping into the extreme overclocking area where you want to keep it cool with very high clock speeds. Your CPU is running at 45 degrees max which is 15 degrees below the "too hot" zone, and 15 Celsius is plenty of headroom which is perfectly fine. There's no need to swap out your CPU cooler at all currently. Just keep in mind CPUs have varying thermal limits, 60-62 degrees applies to the FX series processors, and you want to keep them below that. I'd say your best bet currently it to get yourself a new GPU and monitor and enjoy smoother 1080p gaming.

  • 71 months ago
  • 1 point

There's a 760 reference card on sale on newegg for 200$ after rebate. Would I get higher temps from that than my 560ti, and how much of a difference is that price than the 270x when demand goes down?

  • 71 months ago
  • 1 point

The MSRP for the 270x is $199, so it will probably hover within that (right now they range from $210-240 for most of them).

  • 71 months ago
  • 1 point

I would spend $180 for a R9 270, spend $30 on a hyper 212 evo, and spend the rest on a case fan and/or decent keyboard.