Description

Primary uses: Gaming, Programming, derping on the internet.

-Motherboard-

I loved how small this motherboard was at first...and then I had to start building with it. It is small which I thought "Oh awesome, there will more space in my case."

It was a giant pain in the *** to work on especially when plugging everything into it, (everything meaning the cords that gave power to the fans, the front leds, power switch etc.) because of how small it is. It was difficult for me to fit my hands in between everything else that was plugged in without touching the mobo, but I have small hands, so I managed.

The way the "ports" are labelled is convoluted but the manual that came with it shed some light. There where 4 Sata ports labelled Stat1-Sata4, which was confusing at first.

In the end it wasn't bad, and for the price this is a very good mobo. It's not that often one would have to work on it anyway.

It has and HDMI port, two USB ports and two USB 3.0 ports. (Among other kinds of ports.)

-Graphics Card-

Works great! The only problem is that sometimes when I play video games, I hear a high pitched sound coming from one of the fans. It sounds as if the fan is maybe a little out of balance or something? I'm a little concerned but for now it works fine. I don't know how to fix it.

It has an extra HDMI port. :D (among other kinds of ports)

-Case-

The case is amazing and has lots of airflow. The top can be pulled off with ease but won't come off on its own. I like how the hard drive trays are positioned. It is positioned so that the trays slide out from the front after the panel is removed. It made it easier to work on and remove. The fans are easily removable. It also has a compartment on the top in the front that has a removable divider. The cords for fans, front leds, usb, usb3.0 came zip tied which was handy.

An all around practical, spacious, good looking case with easily removable parts and quiet fans.

It comes with three USB ports in the front, and one USB 3.0 port.

-Wifi Card-

Honestly it didn't seem that great at first. It seemed kinda cheap but I got it with the intention of buying a better one later on.

It turns out I was wrong. It was very easy to install and it works great! I didn't even have to install any drivers for it to work. I really like it.

It's only con so far is that the antennas have to be far down on the back of the computer and can get in the way. One can move them, but one has to tighten or hold on to the part that screws on to the wifi card while one adjusts the antennas. (Really not a big deal, just slightly annoying)

EDIT: I didn't end up buying that hard drive because I found one lying around that was the same speed and size. I also may purchase that extra fan at some point, but have not as of yet.

EDIT: This case is AMAZING. I love it so much, I'm going to recommend it to everyone I know because of how awesome it is.

EDIT: I have NO intention of overclocking or using SLI at any point in the future.

EDIT: I know, I know, I know, the PSU is overkill. I got it because it was on sale for the same price as the 500w equivalent so I thought "Why not get more for my money?" In the future I may need more power if I want to add more hard drives or something.

Comments

  • 76 months ago
  • 3 points

Having the ability to SLI isn't a great argument against that board, I think it's a good budget board and there are so many driver issues/ compatibility issues with running in SLI anyways with newer games that it's not yet worth it or a good argument.

Kingston makes excellent memory but I would have gone with dual channel 2x4 sticks.

The high pitched noise you're hearing could very well be coil noise from your GPU which is perfectly normal, maybe try loosening the m3 or whichever screws holding it in and see if that makes a difference.

I disagree that the PSU is over-kill if you plan on using it for a long time they start to put out less and less power over time so I think going more wattage than would be comfortable for the build was a good idea, especially with the sales on those CX series recently.

Recommend a gold plated hdmi cable over any stock one that came with it (especially if the GPU starts to crash/ fail), recommend Corsair AF 120mm fans when you buy more, and an SP 120mm for the front should you choose to upgrade that. Recommend upgrading to Corsair HX/ TX/ AX series PSU down the line for more reliability.

NZXT products have not worked well for me in the past, but I like the look, get a few more zip-ties and work with the cables a bit more if there is room to hide them, don't be afraid to bend.

  • 76 months ago
  • 1 point

All HDMI cables are the same. Either there is signal or there isn't.

  • 76 months ago
  • 0 points

I've found that not to be true based on personal experiences.

  • 76 months ago
  • 2 points

I think the build is great i dont know why all of you are so butthurt about the mobo and him not being able to SLI, you dont ever really need to SLI he can just buy a better card and just use 1 you never ever need 2. However i do agree with the choices of his PSU being to overkill and he shud of gotten 2 sticks of Ram instead of 1 so he would of gotten better performance. But all in all its fine.

  • 76 months ago
  • 1 point

Yeah, knowing this now about the memory, now I kind of regret getting the one stick. But hey, I'm satisfied with it. I haven't had any problems and haven't had any problems with its performance.

I got that PSU because it was on sale and the same price as the 500w I looked at initially.

Also, I'm a chick. ^

  • 76 months ago
  • 2 points

Awesome buildman

  • 76 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks. :D

  • 76 months ago
  • 1 point

The biggest problem I have with this build is the MOBO, you can't SLI with it which if you ever wanted to will cost you more money in the long run since you'd have to buy a new motherboard first.

Also since you can't SLI at this point your PSU is overkill.

Also I would've went with an 8gb 2x4 module RAM and preferably corsair. The two modules would've taken advantage of dual channel memory, the corsair is just a brand preference.

Also just another personal opinion I would've gone with the i5-4670K at this point. It's what... maybe another $20 or so?

Last comment I'd say is just tidy up the cables a bit.

In the end I'm not trying to put the build down or be a ****, just giving my thoughts and criticisms for either your next build or improving this one at a later point.

Also the high pitch sound on that card might be something normal idk. I have an EVGA 770 however and I've never heard it... maybe check into that somehow

All in all though the build is solid, still a nice build in the end :)

  • 76 months ago
  • 1 point

Going for the 4670k would've warranted for getting a Z87 board, which would probably be at least $50 more, and that's to get a low-end board. Not sure if that would be within OP's budget.

  • 76 months ago
  • 0 points

I agree, just a thought I had. I would've rather put in $50 more then get a CPU that is very annoying to OC a bit better mobo

  • 76 months ago
  • 1 point

I'm not super ecstatic about this mobo either, but I have no intention of using SLI ever.

What is the advantage of using the dual channel memory?

RuinedGrave is right about the motherboard. That's why I chose this CPU instead. :( It came down to budget issues.

I know the PSU has more wattage than I need right now, but it was on sale for the same price as the 500w I wanted before, so I thought "Why not get more for my money?"

Thanks for your input guys!

  • 76 months ago
  • 1 point

I also didn't feel the need to go with a Haswell CPU because I felt like the cost to performance increase ratio wasn't that great comparatively to this Ivy Bridge CPU. From doing a good amount a research, I found that there isn't much of a performance increase and that Haswell architecture is mostly more energy efficient. I'd rather get a slightly older mobo that's good than get a low end newer mobo.

This decision saved me about $40-$70.

  • 76 months ago
  • 1 point

@RyneSmith

Plus it is pretty high CAS lol

  • 76 months ago
  • 1 point

Looks like you've learned a bit from your 1st build. I think Ryne has made some valid observations.

You mentioned that you initially liked the concept of a small sized motherboard to leave you more space in your case. And if more space in your case is a goal then you might want to look and your cable management. Is it possible to route your 8 pin power cable behind the motherboard and come out just over the top of where it connects?

Is it possible to flip over the Power Supply to keep the cables to the rear of the case?

Most important is figuring out what is going on with your GPU. I would contact EVGA for some help with this issue.

How do you like this case... It looks pretty sweet.

  • 76 months ago
  • 1 point

I tried flipping over the power supply, but it didn't fit correctly for some reason. O.o Yeah I think you guys are right, I think I'll contact EVGA. I also friggin' love this case. It has a honey comb mesh sort of metal design on the front, top, and side that allows this. It's really easy to work with and was very well designed. ^

Yeah, I'm gonna try to neaten up the cables a bit. I'm just glad it works right now.

  • 76 months ago
  • 2 points

You could be hearing coil whine. Check out some videos/reviews about that. I think you got a lot of performance at that price point. Nice work!

  • 76 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks. :D I tried really hard.

  • 76 months ago
  • 1 point

i wouldn't worry so much about the comments saying you should've gone with another processor, unless you were considering overclocking. most of a game workload will be on the GPU, and the one you picked should be more than enough for single-monitor 1080p gaming. in my personal experience, upgrading the CPU (Phenom II quad-core to FX eight-core) doesn't yield much of an apparent benefit, but upgrading the GPU (GTX460 to GTX570) made a significant impact.

my real point of comment about this build is the RAM. it's an accepted norm to have two sticks of RAM in dual-channel mode since the arrangement offers better overall performance through doubled throughput. using two 4GB sticks would've allowed you to effectively double your memory throughput and still remain within budget.

it also wouldn't hurt to look up how to do proper cable management. i highly recommend watching the one from Linus Tech Tips.

  • 76 months ago
  • 0 points

I would have gotten the 8350 for that price. WOuld have been a much better choice. :T

  • 76 months ago
  • 0 points

nice build but why locked i5 and not a 8350?

  • 76 months ago
  • 1 point

Only because I guess you could say I'm biased against AMD. I've had really terrible experiences with those CPU's in the past. (In pre-built computers) To be fair, those computers where probably where not that great to begin with.

When I was doing research I also heard a lot of people say that you get more bang for your buck with Intel CPUs. (IDK if this is actually true or not)

I also heard that a lot of the newer AMD CPUs are a couple of years old, and some of the Intel ones are only a year to a few months old.

Carey Holzman (on youtube) also suggests Intel CPUs.

Also, most of the AMD CPUs are lower on this hierarchy chart. http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/gaming-cpu-review-overclock,3106-5.html

  • 76 months ago
  • 1 point

the bang for buck is not true amd has the best bang for the buck and im running a 8350 in my system and nothings wrong with it i have had no crashes highest temp is around 60 (oc 4.7) its really fast and amd mother boards are cheaper . i have also done a htpc for family and 2 apu builds for friends introducing them to pc gaming no complaints yet for higher end pcs go intel but if your under a thousand go amd also sexy case

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  • 76 months ago
  • -2 points

You heard. Wrong it seems about amd. You would have saved money and got better performance with amd setup

[comment deleted]
  • 76 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks. ^