Description

Grab a drink or something to eat because this is a bit of a read. Apologies for the poor quality photos, my phone is borderline ancient these days.

My old system recently turned 6 years old and boy was its lack of performance holding me back! In November I began researching new parts for a new system that I would build myself this time having never built one before. I spent MONTHS researching every aspect of the parts I wanted to buy and I sure did learn a lot! But in March I eventually settled on the parts listed below and bought them, around $2600 worth which is quite a bit of dough when you're an unemployed graduate...

Here are the parts of my build:

Case - First part I picked was the case as it had to be a certain maximum height to fit underneath my desk. The Mini R2 fit the bill perfectly and I love it! Much better than the alternative which was the Corsair 350D. It's got great radiator compatibility, a built-in fan controller, removable bays and it just looks fantastic. The only negative is that there isn't much room for cable management compared to larger cases, you'll have to excuse my attempt at clean cable management.

Motherboard - The case I chose meant that mATX was the largest form factor I could work with which was fine by me. I had to choose between Z97 and X99 platforms, I chose Z97 for a number of reasons but mainly because of the further cost of X99. With that decision made I bought the best Z97 mATX board on the market, I don't skimp on motherboards. The Gene7 has top quality components and has loads of features including a great in-depth bios for overclocking. A minor issue during installation was the IO shield. The padding on it was so thick that I really had to push the board hard with force and hold it there in order to get the screw holes in line with the standoffs on the case. I was worried the board would bend or torque but I got it installed eventually.

CPU - Hardest choice of the build. The i5 4690k did weigh on my mind for a long time. Do I really need hyper-threading for that much more money? In my opinion the i7 4790k is the pinnacle of 4-core processors in terms of max performance. Devils Canyon has better thermals (still shocking TIM spread though so I might have a go at delidding in the future) plus more consistent higher OC's than launch Haswell, Broadwell won't reach the max OC clocks of the 4790k from what I've read and Skylake is still a while away along with its rumoured new socket. Therefore I invested in the 4790k for the long haul and I think it's brilliant compared to the old core2dou e8500 I was using before. When overclocked, the 4790k should remain the best 4-core processor for a while yet.

Cooler - I knew from the beginning I wanted to do some serious overclocking and hence was always going to go with water cooling. Custom loop was overkill and over budget, so I looked for a reliable and popular 240mm radiator to fit in the top of my case. After triple-checking measurements and clearance I went with the H105 over the H100i for the extra cooling performance. Great cooling with a reasonably quiet pump, I highly recommend the H105.

Memory - I spent way too much time researching everything about memory; frequencies, timings, voltages, overclocking, undervolting, ranks, memory chips and dual-side vs. single-side DIMMs. As DDR3 evolution comes to an end, a lot of people still swear by budget kits of 2x4GB 1600mhz CAS 9 @ 1.5v as all you will ever need in terms of DDR3, but I wanted to get the best out of every part of this build within my budget. I love this kit from G.Skill, It offers great performance for a fantastic price. 16GB is plenty for my VMs and a RAMdisk, 2400mhz brings performance gains without hindering my everyday CPU OC, CAS 10 at 2400mhz are strong timings, 2 DIMMs instead of 4 which lightens the load on the IMC and motherboard, the DIMMs themselves are dual-ranked for better performance and lastly you don't need to fear running 1.65v memory on a Devils Canyon CPU. One last thing about the Tridents, the removable red heat sink helps a lot with radiator clearance if needed. Thumbs up to G.Skill for this great kit, it sure beats the hell out of the 4GB of 800mhz DDR2 I've been using all these years.

Storage - My old Seagate 160GB 7200rpm SATA2 HDD had served me well over the last 6 years but now I'm just so over hard drives. They are noisy, slow and prone to damage causing failure. For me M.2 is not yet worth the extra money over a regular SATA3 SSD. Samsung at the moment are doing great things in the area of consumer level solid state drives with their 3D VNAND technology. The reviews of their 850 Pro showed it was king of SATA3 SSDs but the 1TB model I was after was too expensive for my budget. Thankfully the 850 EVO was released while I was researching parts and was cheaper than the Pro plus it performed just as well in reviews. There are no worries at all with the longevity of the 3D TLC flash in the 850 EVO compared to the bulletproof 3D MLC flash of the 850 Pro, unlike the somewhat troublesome 2D TLC flash in the previous 840 EVO. Samsung have worked really hard to improve their TLC flash. I'm really pleased with how fast it is at booting into windows and loading programs. Once you go to a SSD you don't want to go back to a HDD!

Graphics - My display is a 22inch TV which doubles as my 1080p computer monitor and also has an old PS2 connected to it. I'm not a big gamer and I'm not doing any major content creation or work with CAD. All I needed was a reasonable budget card that could handle the odd old game here and there. My last two cards have been team red but this time around NVidia had the better card that suited my needs. I chose the MSI model of the 750ti because it forwent the external power connector (750ti doesn't need it), it had all the display outputs I needed and I had heard great things about their twin frozr cooler. It serves its purpose very well and as you will see it's got lots of room for overclocking. This card is great! It's compact, runs cool, it's inaudible even at max load and you can really get deep into overclocking it.

Optical Drive - I still use discs so I needed one. If you're building a desktop rig and you've got enough room in the case to fit one in, you probably should install one as they are still relevant. I spent $89 for an LG Blu-Ray Burner that matched the look of my case, you never know when it might come in handy.

OS - Easiest decision of the build. Wasn't comfortable with windows 8.1 so I'm going to ride out Windows 7 until I really need Windows 10... or if I need to build a new rig because this one dies :S

CPU Fans - I don't like noisy computers and this build needed to be as silent as possible. The stock Corsair fans from the H105 are too loud even after tuning fan curves. I did not even bother with them, went straight for the highly regarded NF-F12 from Noctua. I've got two of these running in a pull configuration (easier to clean) with the H105 and it keeps the CPU cool and quiet... really quiet!

Case Fans - Same deal here, the case fans also needed to be quiet. I installed all three as intake fans. Using the fan controller on the front panel of the case, these Aerocool Dead Silence fans are inaudible at 5v (~500rpm), noticeable at 7v (~800rpm) and loud at 12v (~1200rpm). I leave them on 5v most of the time and they are truly silent. I love the rubber construction, they've got a good weight and feel to them, don't have any vibration issues and have white LEDs for a bit of bling. Three of them at 5v also creates just enough airflow to have positive pressure in the case. Hurrah for clean interiors!

Power Supply - To power all of this I chose the Fractal Newton R3. 600W is overkill for what I need at the moment but that was the lowest watt version Fractal made. If you didn't already know, Fractal Design make really good stuff! Fractal have matched and possibly beaten Seasonic at their own game with this PSU, it takes the 80+ Platinum efficiency rating to the next level. Its silent fan and zero coil whine keeps overall noise levels down which is a thumbs up for me! But I did have two minor issues with this PSU. The unit I received came with a French power cord, they probably don't make Australian models. No need to worry though, I used a suitable existing power cord from another old computer in the house. The other issue was the silicone glue and heat shrink wrap on the end of the 8pin CPU power connector, I could not bend the cable enough to fit between the motherboard and the radiator at the top of the case. So I VERY carefully cut off the wrap so that I could gently bend the wires enough to fit it into the 8pin CPU power socket. Phew!

---OVERCLOCKING---

CPU

I think I'm slightly above average here in the silicon lottery. At one extreme I can get a stable 4.0GHz at 1 volt and the other extreme a screenshot-stable 5.0GHz (the magical 5GHz) at 1.424v. For an everyday 24/7/365 overclock I settled on 4.7GHz with (amazingly) stock adaptive voltage which means 0.720v at dead idle and 1.264v max load. To get 4.8GHz stable, even with the memory frequency lowered to 1600mhz, required a whopping 0.128v extra Vcore and I was certainly not going to run 1.392v max load as my everyday OC as temperatures were way too high. I'm very happy with 4.7GHz @ stock adaptive voltage and 2400MHz XMP memory. The H105 handles those 4.7GHz voltages with ease ensuring temps stayed in the 70's with the various high stress loads of Prime95(v26.6), Aida64, Povray, Cinebench or RealBench. Only unrealistically flogging the 4790k's FPU with AVX code (Aida64 FPU only/newer versions of Prime95) resulted in a maximum of 90c on just one of the four cores, nowhere near throttling. Again, really impressive cooling from the H105.

GPU

If you're prepared to get your hands dirty with Maxwell Bios Tweaker and NVFlash, you can really squeeze a lot more performance out of the 750ti than just with Afterburner or PrecisionX. At complete stock I was getting a max boost clock of 1201MHz with 1.137v on the GPU core and 1350MHz (5400MHz effective) stock memory speed. After weeks of research, fiddling and testing with the 750ti BIOS in MBT I found my maximum stable overclock. 1437MHz max boost clock, 1.200v GPU core and 1480(5920)MHz memory and it does all of this on only PCI-E slot power. To get this 20% increase in core clock I had to do the following in MBT: Raise TDP limit from 38W to PCI-E slot maximum of 65.5W, Raise core voltage from 1.137v to the hardwired maximum of 1.200v, raise a select few clock voltages to their maximum and offset the boost table by +104MHz in addition to the XBAR and L2C clocks. Final touch in MBT was to set the default memory speed to 1480MHz and then flash it to the card with the NVFlash v5.196 for Windows. No need to hex-edit anything or modify hardware (both are beyond my knowledge and nerves), BIOS hacking is enough for the 750ti. Unigine Valley verifies the increase in performance, stock was netting me an average rate of 42fps at 1080p Ultra 0xAA and now with the modified BIOS I'm getting a completely stable 50fps average with not a single artefact, TDR or crash. Best part is that it still lowers the core, memory and voltage to idle levels while I'm not gaming or stress testing. The highest temperature I've reached is 68c and the twin frozr fans remain silent all the time never spinning faster than 44% during all of my testing.

---Final Thoughts/Future Upgrades---

Really happy with how my first build turned out. Had a great time overclocking and I'm very happy with those results on the CPU and GPU. Possible upgrades down the line include Windows 10 installed on an M.2 drive and an upgrade of the graphics card depending on whether GTX980 prices are lowered and what AMD release this year to challenge the 980.

Congrats on making it through all that reading, I hope you like my build as much as I do and please give it a +1.

Cheers!

Part Reviews

CPU

Amazingly, the 4790K still remains the pinnacle of Intel 4 core processors! Almost 2 years since I built my z97 rig and this little beauty is still going strong. About 2 months in I had to lower my everyday OC from 4.7 to 4.6GHz because of stability issues, but I'm still ecstatic with 4.6GHz running on stock adaptive voltage (1.264v max under load) as an everyday OC. I'm still able to ramp it up to the magical 5.0GHz for a bragging rights screenshot, but the voltage required and subsequent temperatures are now too great for my H105 to handle effectively. I love my little rocket ship of a CPU! Great investment and it's going to last me a long time and it certainly isn't slowing down :)

Comments

  • 57 months ago
  • 2 points

+1 nice build and good description! Very good OC-results! You could get better cable management with single sleeved PSU-cables. Then maybe your U-Turn with the 8-pin would be less of a problem. But since the PSU is semi-modular, you would have to DIY for the 24pin and the 8pin. Enjoy your build.

  • 57 months ago
  • 2 points

Thank you. Glad to hear you made it through all that reading! I did think about going with the Corsair AX760i with its fully modular ribbon cables, but I went with the cheaper and slightly better performing Fractal which still has a heap more wattage headroom left over.

  • 57 months ago
  • 2 points

Nice choice of parts for what you intend to use this PC for. That GPU though may limit you in the future, but you can easily upgrade it if you need to in the future. Also, congrats on achieving that 4.7 overclock! :) +1

  • 57 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks for the feedback

appreciate it :)

  • 57 months ago
  • 2 points

Holy ****...you weren't joking when you said it was a long read...

  • 57 months ago
  • 1 point

haha. But you got through it, correct? Well done :)

  • 57 months ago
  • 2 points

i like!

  • 57 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks mate. I just checked out your build, you've got some serious dollars worth of kit in that computer case!

have you had a go at overclocking the 4770k?

  • 57 months ago
  • 1 point

hahaa...thanks and i havent overclocked yet...ill get to it real soon

  • 57 months ago
  • 1 point

All good..but in current times you'll be capped by 2GB Vram on your GPU in current games and not even to mention the upcoming ones. Too bad 'cos the rest of your specs look v.good. My two Gtx970s are struggling from time to time not because lack of fps...but their's 3.5GB Vram...so..u know what I mean.

  • 57 months ago
  • 2 points

Yeah I've heard a lot of concern about 2gb VRAM. But similar to what Stuart has said, 1080p gaming on a single monitor has still got some time to go until we need more than 2GB. Don't worry, I've got my eyes on that GTX980 and I'm eager to see what AMD release this year.

The 750ti is just a filler card until I can afford a decent upgrade later in the year. The 750ti is a great little card though and will go into my updated old system which has been given a second lease of life as my folks study room desktop.

  • 57 months ago
  • 2 points

He isn't playing modern games.

  • 57 months ago
  • 1 point

^ This! When I've got more money I'll be upgrading the graphics card and then I might buy some modern titles and get into Gaming again. But at the moment my time is occupied by my efforts to find employment.

  • 57 months ago
  • 1 point

Welp i hope you'r efforts to find employment pay off soon, and when it they do i recommend either a 290x or gtx 970(preferable) as a starting point, they will handle nearly any game maxed.

  • 57 months ago
  • 1 point

I think by the time the 2gb vram becomes an issue with 1080p gaming, the current gen gpu's will have drastically dropped in price so an upgrade wont be such a major problem! Anything more than 2gb on a 750ti would be a waste anyways... Much like the 960.

Great build and some pretty good results with the overclocking! +1

  • 57 months ago
  • 1 point

GTA V uses right around 2.9GB of VRAM. SO it is a usable aspect in today's games on 1080p.

  • 57 months ago
  • 1 point

Or even 3.3-3.5GB when you push all the slider up in "Advanced Graphic Options"...still "only" in 1080p.

  • 57 months ago
  • 1 point

That's why I got a 1080p BenQ 144hz monitor and 980GTX. This way I can ensure max out :)

  • 57 months ago
  • 1 point

For your stated intentions the build looks great. But please clean up the cables, it's a mess in there.

  • 57 months ago
  • 1 point

Fantastic write up, this I enjoyed, you explained why you went with each part, other than it looked nice and what not. Cool cool.

  • 57 months ago
  • 1 point

Good to hear folks enjoyed the effort I put into the description! Hopefully it helps someone out there who is looking at building a system with similar parts.

  • 57 months ago
  • 2 points

Yup looks laid out well, you explained each part well enough. I just finished my build, came to around 3800 with shipping and all parts. I will have my build list up soon once everything gets here.

This is my build, somewhat the same as yours. http://pcpartpicker.com/p/8h7pnQ

  • 57 months ago
  • 1 point

Looking good! those Sennheiser's... I might have to check them out. Enjoy your build!

I wish I lived in the US. Australians get flogged by the USD to AUD rate these days as well as our colloquially known "Australia Tax" where everything (especially electronics) costs a lot more than what it should. ITS BS MATE!

  • 57 months ago
  • 2 points

Yea, Ima make a Youtube build video so people can see that. Also hopefully get some good pics. I bought the Sennheisers after about 1 hour or reviewing. I was torn between the Astro A50, SteelSeries H and the Sennheisers. It is a hard choice, I love wireless but the Senns overall got a great review.

I can't get over how much shi# costs these days, seriously 300 bucks for a f'ing pair of mediocre headphones? LOL.

Might I add bro, you REALLY gotta get a new desk. About 250 shipped from Office Depot, get one around 36 inches deep, they are perfect for everything.

  • 57 months ago
  • 1 point

Love the build, case is by far my fav part. Nice OC on the CPU, my friend wants that cooler for the build he asked me to do with an FX-9590.

  • 57 months ago
  • 1 point

Nice build man, i'm planning a very similar build and i can't wait!...totally agree with you on SSD, i can't wait to get rid of this mechanical drive.

Only thing I would do differently is a cheaper Mobo and smaller case. but i dont plan to OC and thus will use air cooling, don't think there;s any real world performance benefit.

  • 57 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks mate.

can I suggest one thing to you? If your not going to increase your core clock at least try to lower your cpu voltage that way it runs even cooler and your air cooler won't have to spin as fast.

Have fun with the build!

  • 57 months ago
  • 1 point

thanks, i'm debating whether to just buy an i7 4790s since it only puts out 65w, so a noctua nh9 could keep it cool without any heat or noise issues easily. or i'll see if i can wait for the skylake if it comes out soon.

Just got my case yesterday.

  • 57 months ago
  • 1 point

Take your PC off the floor the dust can get inside the fan.

  • 53 months ago
  • 1 point

Is the Arc Mini R2 quiet (under load), in your opinion? Does it stand out in an otherwise silent room or does it sound like a calm breeze?

  • 53 months ago
  • 2 points

In a dead silent room the system is still audible at idle, mainly because of the CPU cooler pump with the fans producing a faint low hum at the lowest setting of 5v. Under a reasonable load the Noctua CPU fans remain quiet but I would not leave it on overnight and sleep in the same room, it's just loud enough to be distracting unfortunately. It definitely isn't loud be any means though (it's a calm breeze to answer your question). For true silence you need to build without fans or pumps, but there are cases out there with better noise suppression design than the Mini R2.

  • 53 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks. I will consider other mini cases.

  • 57 months ago
  • 0 points

Nice build, but a couple problems. You should have gone with a less expensive mobo for 115. no point in a special one like that. Also you should have gone with a 9590 from AMD. It is octa core with 4.7 ghz. Amd runs hot but you used a liquid cooler so you could get good overclocking for about 85 bucks less. Also with one card of that caliber you don't need more wattage. That ram is way overkill. I read what you said and it is still overkill. Go with 1866 2x8 if it means that much, but if you don't do any content creation, you're never going to use more that 8. Your 1tb of SSD was a huge mistake. Just do 500gb (im doing 250 on a beast build) and get 1 or 2 tb of hard drive space. My 2tb was 80 bucks and my 250 ssd (evo 850 but not 850 pro) was 90 minus tax at microcenter. Next, you are getting a gtx 970 or 960. Overall you kinda wasted money for a gaming build considering you are not doing any content creation. I hate to say it, but -10. I could get better in game performance for even less. I could get a great build for 1.25k. Sorrymate but -10 for the build.

  • 57 months ago
  • 2 points

A lot of your comments are about "overkill" Nothing in this build was overkill, he bought streamlined proven parts with high reliability. I think besides the graphics card, this was a great build. Some people don't care about saving 45$ on a motherboard or memory when they are spending 2000 or more on a build.

  • 57 months ago
  • 1 point

"streamlined proven parts with high reliability... besides the graphics card, this was a great build"

Sums it up perfectly. I'm well aware that the GPU is the bottleneck, I don't need to upgrade just yet though, will do so later in the year.

  • 57 months ago
  • 2 points

Hey White_out,

Thanks for the constructive criticism, but I hope you have read all of my description as it looks like your comment has received its own criticism from others below. Anyway, let me address the points you've mentioned/suggested:

Overall - I built this system to be as high quality as possible for a student/work workload (not gaming) with a planned budget of no more than AUD$2700 so that budget gave me a bit of flexibilty. By spending that much money in one hit I also wanted it to be long-term reliable and as 'future-proof' (a controversial topic on pc forums) as possible. Consider me as an enthusiast/overclocker not a gamer.

Graphics - I cheaped out on the graphics cards because A) the GTX980 would've broke the budget B) at this point in time I don't need anything more than a 750ti C) Its the easiest part of the build to upgrade excluding memory D) I wanted to wait for AMD to release their next generation of cards later this year as I'm not impressed with the R9 290 temps or tdp. I will eventually get into modern title gaming, but not right now.

Motherboard - I don't skimp on motherboards when spending this much money on a system that will hopefully last as long as the one it is replacing. The Gene is built with ASUS's best electrical components, It's their flagship mATX board and a $100 premium on a quality motherboard doesn't bother me, so that's why I bought it. Yes some of its features will go unused (GameFirst3 is absolute bloatware! be warned!), but I bought the Gene for its top-of-the-line components and reliability.

CPU - OK you've got a point here, I don't have a great understanding of AMD and that's why I've never bought one. I've always gone with Intel but I wouldn't say I'm an Intel fanboy, just a little less enlightened about AMD. You say they run hot? That's a no-no for me. I'm happy with my 4.7GHz OC, it idles in the high 20's and 100% load stress testing doesn't breach 80c.

Memory - Whether it affects real world performance or not, all reviews were showing 2400c10 was a great performing combination which represents the 'sweet spot' for high performance DDR3. 2x8gb is enough for my current workload and accommodates whatever I throw at it in the future. Again its that high performance, reliability and future-proof theme I was targeting throughout the build and it wasn't an expensive option either. I didn't want to settle for less when it didn't cost that much more for the best.

Storage - I considered a 'small OS SSD +large storage HDD' combo, decided against it for simplicity and space saving. I went all out for the 1TB because chances are working in the IT industry I'll be clogging it up with VM's, source code and the like. Plus data keeps getting larger each year, in 5 years time 1TB will be the new 250GB. My workload at the moment values an SSD more than a high performance graphics card, hence I spent the money on the 850 EVO not a GTX980.

I don't view my system as a waste of money, I love it! It's an investment for the long haul. Its not designed to be a gaming build and AUD$1250 won't get you that far in my opinion. I hope you turn that frown upside-down down and at least give the build a neutral '0'.

oh dear... that's another long read!

Cheers.

  • 57 months ago
  • 1 point

Dear god mate, you confused everyone! We are all talking AMERICAN dollars. Things coming together now. So yes, you are an overclocker which is what I was thinking. I wuold say AMD but it seems like you know your shtick (polite way of saying sh** in yiddush, also meaning stuff). With an AMD 9590, I got to over 5.2ghz, but I have pretty good cooling (doing an intel build next it will be BEAST if I say so myself). Now, I have drooled over the supposed fiji xt benchmarks (amd 380 gpu). It is amazing but some price to go with it. A good $450 price tag I presume. But ya I was thinkin' 'bout that too! I do not particularly like your motherboard, but hey, if you want a reliable z97, I would go maximus or sabertooth by Asus. Asus knows how to make a darn good motherboard. CPU, I spoke early on this one so you can refer to the specs above. AMD does run hot, but you have an all-in-one. That CPU you have is my personal favorite, but the numbers are not amazing. In gaming, you use 2-3 and SOMETIMES 4. So I could use all 4ghz of that. But, AMD has an octa-core 4.7ghz processor. It is not hot out of the box, but it can be tough to overclock at cool temps. I have water cooling as well, so not doubt you could hit 5ghz with ease and low temps. Memory, not going to argue with you there as I just found out you are in the IT industry. Not too knowledgeable but I bet that's a worthwhile buy. Storage, yes y it is tough to manage an HDD and some solid state but it's not impossible. Personal Preference really. I would still reccomend maybe getting an HDD to go with for mass archiving. I'm sorry if I said it was a waste, I just thought you could save a little cash. I will suggest yo go for the 300 series or a 970 because the 970 is the budget for performance sweet spot. 50% of the price of a 980 but 85% of the performance. By the way, $1250 USD goes to $1600 AUD. Some confusion am I right? Sorry if the overuse of "mate" offended your Australian origins. Part South-African here living in 'Murica so yes I do say mate in day to day life as well. Anyways thank YOU for getting this far. 'Tis a long read as well. Have a nice day!

  • 57 months ago
  • 1 point

He said it was for the odd game here and there..he isn't a gamer *******..next don't criticize people if you didn't look at what he wrote..your really Damn cocky to write this when you didn't notice half of what he did... please down vote his extremely stupid comment.. like dude...#1 he said he didn't want another mechanical drive in his life..#2 he said he wanted a good mobo for his build #3 YOU DONT PUT AMD IN A 2.6k build..that's stupid.amd is for budget builds no one buys there stuff for extreme builds. #4 his build has a big budget so why the **** cant his memory be good too? He said he is done with CRAP frequency memory #5 LIKE I SAID BEFORE. HE SAID HE NEEDED THE GPU FOR THE ODD GAME HERE AND THERE that means this isn't a gamer build...he is a college student. Before you go off on a rant read their description and understand why they need it dumass

  • 57 months ago
  • 0 points

Whoa easy there mate, I did not try to get you butt-hurt. Firstly, I was not criticizing him nor mocking him just making friendly suggestions. I read his passage just making suggestions. He talks of overclocking his cpu and gpu, but why would he need to if he does do anything graphics intensive. I think he overclocks to overclock (maybe to see the numbers I would like an explanation on that one, too. Wouldn't you?). You became very upset with the mentioning of a hard drive. He was using a 6 year old 120gb drive. Now if you have any sense, trust me I think you probably know what you're doing, then you should know how ridiculous that soundss, am I right? Secondly, the motherboard I am sure is great. He wanted the best Micro Atx z97 motherboard. The best does not mean the most expensive. Trust me I was about to spend money on a Mark S motherboard, but decided "I got the budget, but I don't quite think it's worth the money for me." Just a personal thing. I am going white out build and will spray paint shtick instead. Fun project, right? Thirdly, You are right on that Amd does not have a place in $ 2,600 build. But I saw that number - $1402. And I have to say even if the other items that are custom items are not included, I mean this thing won't even break 2k. So yes, AMD is a great option because he does not have the huge budget you think and he talks of trying to overclock which is tough for AMD processors; Not because they can't reach those big numbers, but rather the AMD processors (and video cards which are by no means top notch) get very hot. But he's got an all-in-one cooler, so I am sure he will be fine. But wait, there's more! With AMD processors, you can get big numbers for the people who like to see those awesome numbers, but they don't hold up well in games; however, he said he does not enjoy games am I right? The memory is overkill trust me. He is entitled to spend money the way he wants, but he does not do content creation nor heavy games. I have a feeling he will never use more than six! Come on man let's agree on a couple things, that being one of them. Also faster RAM may give you a little better performance, but it's not cost effective. This guy does not have a job so that extra cash is worth every cent. I guarantee you there is a much more cost effective RAM kit than that even in the same color. Numba five, almost done mate (you've done well reading this essay like explanation)! The one that I suggest, a 970, is 300 bucks. He is waiting for the 980 (15% better) to drop in price. I would say just go with a 970 or even a 960 right now. They are half the price of the 980 but 85% of the performance. So yes, he seems like a secret gamer whether it be casual or fps or what. He may even just want to benchmark which seems like his intentions judging by his overclocking a 4790k but not using anything. By the way, if you could refrain from using bad language that would be wonderful. Enjoy your day!

  • 57 months ago
  • 1 point

No bad feelings from me mate :) although Raj did go full rant-mode on you.

I completely understand all the points you make. But just to clarify, I'm an overclocker who does it for the thrill, I set a strict budget of AUD$2700 max and intentionally cheaped out on the graphics card knowing I would eventually replace it with a premium card. The new graphics card will round out a high level of performance across all parts of the build.

At the moment my workload isn't very stressful. Heavy web browsing, Virtual Machines, programming and a little retro gaming. But the point of this build was that it would last me 5 years and demolish any workload I threw at it during that time frame.

Cheers