Description

I actually first started building this comp back in 2013 (my first build), and played with it a lot (games, school, etc) and then started to see many water-cooling computers out in the comp society so I decided, why not do one of my own? It would have been a great project and after doing months of studying, I decided it was about time to buy my components. I'm pretty sure some will agree/disagree with what I have chosen to build my rig but I have done what I did for aesthetics and performance. The ram was purely for aesthetics and had gotten them a while back so there's no point in replacing them for the time being as they suffice for any use that I have. The recent items that I had purchased for this build was the water-cooling pieces. I had previously owned the xspc raystorm 750 EX240 kit so I just used the cpu waterblock and radiator that came with it. I wouldn't say I am the most satisfied customer from xspc because my cpu waterblock is a bit scratched(quite minimal) and i do not know if it is just me but placing the cpu waterblock onto the cpu is the hardest **** for me. I have to literally push as hard as i can to screw the nails into the backplate on the back of the motherboard. The nails are quite short and it is such a huge hassle whenever I want to take out the waterblock. The xspc 780/titan waterblock was actually quite the opposite. The installation was a breeze and it cools like a champ! The xspc 240mm radiator that came with the xspc cpu kit is quite thin and I'm not quite sure if replacing it would help me achieve better temps. My cpu idles around 30 while oc to 4.6ghz whereas my gpu idles at 28-30. It can oc to 1175mhz easily while maintaining stability so I am quite satisfied about that! I chose the reservoir purely for aesthetics though I wouldn't say it is the best reservoir for water-cooling. The inner holes are some-what blocked by the helix and can potentially cause a blockage towards your water-flow if you don't remember to move the helix away from the inlet and outlet. When I first turned on the pump, I was devastated because the water was barely moving even at full speed but after leaving it for a few hours, I came to realize there were massive air bubbles. Doing this project was quite interesting and fun. I learned many new things and am always open for suggestions so please feel free to comment about anything!

Edit: For those of you that will comment about the reservoir, yes it does come with a uv cathode that would make the reservoir/all uv products in your case look absolutely amazing! However, my cathode came as doa so im waiting for a replacement ): I can only light it up with the led lights that were built in my nzxt phantom 820. I will probably be getting some uv cathodes for the case in the future.

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Comments

  • 70 months ago
  • 3 points

CPU cooled by a T-virus antidote? Now that's a fine build design!!

  • 70 months ago
  • 1 point

haha thanks! I just wish I had a working uv cathode to go with it; but I have a replacement on its way (:

  • 70 months ago
  • 2 points

Nice build. But GPU temp under load = 35deg C. Hmm you might wanna check that.

  • 70 months ago
  • 2 points

Really awesome for your frist rig. Welcome to the community of water cooling. You get in, but you just never go back to air. It's really an obsession imo.

  • 70 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks and yep, it really is! an expensive obsession..

  • 70 months ago
  • 1 point

What is this?

http://postimg.org/image/xpoujkj15/

The spiral green thing is the cylindrical reservoir?

  • 70 months ago
  • 1 point

It is the part listed as "FrozenQ Fusion Resevoir". You can find more of their reservoirs here on FrozenCPU.

  • 70 months ago
  • 1 point

It is indeed the reservoir. It's often referred to as the T-Virus but is made by FrozenQ under the product name of Liquid Fusion.

  • 70 months ago
  • 1 point

Is the blue and green beside it the ram? If yes how did he fix an led in it?

Will you help in choosing the gpu?

http://pcpartpicker.com/part/sapphire-video-card-1003622sr

or

http://pcpartpicker.com/part/asus-video-card-r9290dc2oc4gd5

  • 70 months ago
  • 1 point

The leds are built-in the ram. It's called Crucial Ballistix Tracer Memory. Check it out on newegg or find them on pcpartpicker

  • 70 months ago
  • 1 point

Awesome! Please help me in this Which one should i choose for my built? http://pcpartpicker.com/part/sapphire-video-card-1003622sr

or

http://pcpartpicker.com/part/asus-video-card-r9290dc2oc4gd5

  • 70 months ago
  • 1 point

I would get the ASUS card because the cooler is great. It is efficient and quiet as well as having excellent waterblock compatibility should you ever want to go that route.

  • 70 months ago
  • 1 point

That RAM is awesome because of the LEDs +1