Description

This was my first computer build and I have to say it went really well. I expected it to be a lot harder but it wasnt. I wanted a computer that i could do everything on. things like surf the web, play minecraft, do homework, etc. It wasnt hard, the parts got here withing two days and that was with free ground shipping so i am very satisfied.

The CPU cooler was a piece of crap. When i wanted to install windows 8 onto my computer, it would go into bios and then shut down because the CPU was at 89 degrees Celsius! So I put the stock CPU cooler on it and that one works great!

I think I might add another 1TB HDD to it later on when it gets old and it starts to slow down. But for now, its faster than lightning.

I switched my USB Wi-fi adapter to a different one (in the pictures)

Comments

  • 75 months ago
  • 16 points

why do i feel like he forgot the thermal compound on the cpu cooler

  • 75 months ago
  • 4 points

my thought exactly...

  • 75 months ago
  • 4 points

I think you're on to something.

[comment deleted]
  • 75 months ago
  • 13 points

Your ram cost more than your video card!!.. maybe that should tell you something

  • 75 months ago
  • 6 points

Not terrible for a first PC, but there were some choices I would have done differently. The APU builds are typically designed for people that do not need the processing power of a dedicated GPU. Since you have expressed that you are not a hardcore gamer, the video card is not really needed. It appears based on this data: http://www.anandtech.com/show/6332/amd-trinity-a10-5800k-a8-5600k-review-part-1/2 that the APU may perform the same or better without the GPU added. I would bench both and eBay the 5450 if it isnt improving performance.

I had a Rosewill fan similar to that Zalman. I learned the same lesson, some aftermarket CPU fans are no better or worse than stock.

Pretty good job on cable management.

I wouldn't sweat the negative reviews too much. Everyone has to start building PCs somewhere. Mine was a beige nightmare in an Antec case. I made mistakes with my HDD, video and PSU.

Enjoy it until it will no longer run the programs you want to run, then upgrade the areas that did not meet your needs. Good Luck!

  • 75 months ago
  • 4 points
  1. Shouldn't have gotten a graphics card if you just want to play minecraft.
  2. Should have gotten an a10 instead of an a8
  3. Should have gotten faster RAM
  4. Should have paid $5 more and gotten a terabyte hard drive.
  5. Pretty good build for your first though. To be quite honest you could have just gotten a build with the fx 6300 and a graphics card for a very similar price but with better performance.
  • 75 months ago
  • 3 points

Drop the a8, get the new althon and better gpu.

  • 75 months ago
  • 2 points

Same price, better performance: http://ca.pcpartpicker.com/p/1I6e6

  • 75 months ago
  • 2 points

You do not need that 5450 in there.

  • 71 months ago
  • 2 points

Personally I would have gone with something like this: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/2Aev3

After reading your description, you never put the cooler on the CPU at first? Did you even watch someone build a PC on YouTube or something before? That is dangerous to be honest. There's no excuse for that at all.

I don't understand why you also purchased a GPU? That was essentially a waste of money if you bought an APU for your system. Not to mention, with 2133MHz memory, the APU would be better, especially if you were to buy an a10 instead of the a8.

Another thing that was basically a waste of money was your memory (RAM) choice. 1333MHz just doesn't make sense. You literally could have bought 2133MHz or even higher for $10-$20 more. That's not much money what so ever. And that higher speed would most definitely help with the APU as stated above. In all honesty, you could have gotten 1600MHz 2x4 kit for less than what you paid for the 1333MHz.

Well overall, you chose a decent PSU and MB, so it's not entirely that bad.

Hopefully you'll understand that I don't mean to bash your choices, but I literally feel with the amount of free information there is these days about PC's, there's no excuse for these types of purchases.

  • 62 months ago
  • 2 points

The hard drive was $216. I think you should of spent that on the video card

  • 35 months ago
  • 1 point

This is very nice and exactly what I would have put around my AM3 motherboard if I was buying new. Notice that my actual build https://pcpartpicker.com/user/Craig_Hubley/saved/CnBvK8 also had a 450W PS, a mid-tower case, a smallish (360GB in mine, 500GB here) boot drive, cheapo optical and silent-at-all-costs video.

I would however dual-boot the machine as there are many things Linux diagnoses far better than Windows (like memory faults) and you always want to be able to boot the machine whatever Microsoft does to your firstborn/license/activation.

Where I think you've made a bit of a mistake, though, is the video card. It's going to draw more power because it won't Crossfire with your APU, there's almost no point in having a 5450 in any box that already has the A8-5600K in it, since the GPU in that APU is better than the 5450's and a 5450 just does nothing to enhance it.

While the 5450 comes in silent models and is good for the DAW/NAS/DB-host/VM-hypervisor purpose I had for it, it just costs power and slows your graphics down! Put that card in a host box.

AMD requires you to match APU and GPU fairly closely, or it used to, to take advantage of the power-saving features. It also goes without saying that the GPU add-in card should be more powerful than the APU's own inbuilt GPU! When the GPU on the card and GPU on the APU cooperate properly, the connections on the motherboard should be used for the primary monitor(s) so that the card's ports can be turned off the save power, while only its GPU functions run (and that only if needed). Only in 3+ monitor configurations do you use the card ports. So you should blow a little extra cash and do what http://www.overclock.net/t/1385808/can-i-crossfire-an-a10-5700-processor-with-a-radeon-hd-5450-graphics-card suggests. They note that "the highest [the A10-5700] can dual graphics with is the 6670, some say that the 7670 will be supported since its pretty much the same card, same goes for the 7750."

The A8-5600K according to http://www.cpu-world.com/info/AMD/Recommended_graphics_cards_for_AMD_dual-graphics.html has a HD 7560D in it and can crossfire with an HD 6570 but NOT a 6670. Also with the 7570 (both DDR and GDDR5 models) and 7670, 7650A and 7670A. It may be a challenge finding a silent version of those, but they exist. Actually your A8-5600K has a very wide range of compatible cards, it's just that the 5450 isn't one of them...

Crossfire to the APU has a great power advantage in that the (compatible) card can be off when it's GPU cores are not needed and its ports may never be needed - if this was done properly and if you kept your storage on the Ethernet, cut the power supply to a quieter 300W one I think. I'd ditch the optical drive and go for a smaller case.

There's even a way to get to 200-250W: A 256GB PCIe SSD can be had for under $100 if you wait around, and that's suitable for OS and apps if you keep your own data on the network, cloud or USB external storage (128GB sticks now $20 each!). I am not sure I want spinning metal in a workstation any more, it just adds vulnerabilities.

  • 75 months ago
  • -3 points

Pretty decent computer for everyday tasks and light/moderate gaming. Good job man!

  • 75 months ago
  • 1 point

thanks man!

[comment deleted]
  • 75 months ago
  • 0 points

ch18ch18ch

  • 75 months ago
  • 2 points

.......How original, oh wait.

[comment deleted]
  • 75 months ago
  • 2 points

.....