Description

A couple of years ago I bought my first computer at staples. I have around $2,000 into it at this point. I thought I was getting an amazing deal (500g hard drive, 4 gigs of DDR2, 400w power supply etc) so yeah now i know I got totally ripped off. After doing tons of research on parts, risk, prices and comparisons. I decided to build my first computer. I bought EVERYTHING from newegg. The main purpose of this computer is multi tasking, quick books, accounting etc. I do not game at all. Right now the only thing I think I need major help on is some "Cable management lol".

Tell me what you guys think? What did I do wrong? What will greatly improve this system for an inexpensive price? Any suggestions?

Thank a lot!

-Michael

PS. It took 4 hours and 20 minutes from start to finish.

Edit: 11.12.2016:

Due to the age of this build the part prices has changed drastically. Here is what I've paid for each.

CPU: AMD A10-5800K Trinity Quad-Core 3.8 GHz $129.99 Motherboard: ASUS F2A55-M/CSM FM2 AMD A55 $79.99
Memory (ram): G.SKILL 16gb (4x4gb) $85.98 Hard Drive: 1tb Western Digital | 7200 RPM $104.99 Graphics Card: AMD FirePro W5100 $325 Case: Sentey Optimus Extreme Division Case $49.99 Power Supply: Antex 520w $54.99 Optical Drive: Asus 24x DVD Burner $19.99 Operating system: Windows 7 Professional $114.99 Monitor: 26" Asus VG232H $159.99 Monitor (2): 26" Asus VG232H $159.99

Other: HDMI Cable: $7 HDMI Cable(2): $3 HDMI Cable(3): $5 Internal Card Reader: $5 Fatal1ty Gaming Headset: $20 Kaspersky Security: $12 Ethernet: $5 Ethernet (2): $11 Ethernet (3): $24 Ethernet (4): $20 MAINFORCE Mousepad: $30 USB HUB: $16 Ethernet Switch: $13 Computer tool kit: $25 Random Cable Connectors: $57 Random PC problems / Fixes: $200

TOTAL COST: $1,737.88

Comments

  • 83 months ago
  • 6 points

I think the reason people are downvoting is because you clearly state that this is for word processing, browsing, and multi-tasking, but you spent about twice as much as you had to. The 16GB of RAM is way overkill. I barely use that much and I run VM's all the time. Also, you probably could've gotten away with an A6-5400K for about $50 cheaper. That said, if it works, it works. And if you're happy with it, that's the most important thing. :)

  • 83 months ago
  • 3 points

I've said it before and I'll say it forever until it stops happening; PPP users hate the phrase "16GB of memory". They see it and start frothing at the mouth, as if there's a nationwide memory rationing program and they're being denied their fare share.

  • 83 months ago
  • 2 points

I'm not saying that I hate it. I was merely saying it was unnecessary for a home computer build.

  • 83 months ago
  • 2 points

I didn't think you were one of the rabid anti-16ers, I thought you were just observing that they are the ones downvoting the build.

  • 83 months ago
  • 2 points

Oh, my mistake then.

  • 83 months ago
  • 1 point

If it works then you didn't do anything wrong. As you stated, the cable management needs some work. My only concern was that over a two year period you've spent $2,000 when a sub-$500 build could multi-task, word process, do accounting, and even handle some low-graphical gaming. Don't let those fools in the brick and mortar places continue to fool you!

  • 83 months ago
  • 1 point

Try to route some of those cables behind the case, at-least untangle that mess and twist tie some of them so it doesn't look as horrible. Also if it's in your budget a solid state drive could serve you well. Other then that I really don't know what to say, it's not balanced too well overall for the price you payed.

  • 83 months ago
  • 1 point

Good stuff, I love the look of that case! Looks like the cable management features aren't quite optimal, but here is my advice with regards to your build and cabling.

-I know it looks awesome, but to be honest unless you are rendering or running virtual machines then 16 GB of RAM is complete overkill. Could have saved yourself $50 but if that's what you want then more power to you.

-This is going to be a long one so bear with me, ill do my best :). What I recommend for your cabling is first and foremost get some cable ties. That is essential to keeping the cables where you want them. I would make sure you know what cables you will need and what ones you don't and separating them. I see that the hard drive cages are removable. I would say remove one of the bays (put your hard drives in the other) and use cable ties to get all the cables you do not need into the space where the cage was. You can probably tie them to perforations in the remaining cage to keep them secure. Now that you have a nice nest of cables out of the way, you can put all the cables you might need in the future but arent using right now or the extra length of cables already in use and tuck them into the little nest of tied cables wherever you can fit them. Don't use cable ties as you might need to access them later and you don't want to re-cable your whose system to do so!

The same goes for the extra length on your front panel connectors, but you can probably use a cable tie to secure those.

The yellow cable cutting across your motherboard to the top left is not a gigantic problem but it would be more optimal and safer if you routed is straight up from the power supply towards the upper right corner of the motherboard, and let the plastic RAM clips passively hold it in place as you wrap it around the top of the motherboard.

I hope this helps!

  • 83 months ago
  • 1 point

For word processing you need like 512mb of RAM lol, but you should have like 4 gigs if you aren't gaming or anything as the OS uses around 1-2gb of RAM

You could have gotten a decent I3 for the same price as the AMD one, Apart from that it looks alright

  • 82 months ago
  • 1 point

up voting for the 4:20

  • 81 months ago
  • 1 point

Very nice, everyone in entitled to their own opinion and If you are happy with what you built then WHO CARES what anyone thinks.... That being said, the only thing I would have done is get a modular power supply and eliminated some of the cables that you werent using. That just makes cleaning up the cables eaiser when done.

  • 83 months ago
  • 0 points

You didn't say what you paid for said PC at staples. A price breakdown of that "$2000" would help make sense of it.

Also, without knowing what it had for a CPU and GFX if any, it's hard to say you got ripped off without doing some price checks (particularly what prices were at THAT time).

I spend a lot of time browsing prices and Best Buy and Staples do tend to have pretty good deals from time to time. Usually Staples more than Best Buy.

Less ram, a cheaper processor, and a cheaper hard drive would have saved you money and you'd notice little difference if any. The money you saved could have been put toward a solid state which would have made a HUGE difference.

  • 83 months ago
  • 0 points

Nice build! Work a bit cable mgmt, maybe get an SSD and a 7770, 650 ti. 7850 or even a 7870 to round it off nicely. Although if you don't game the gfx doesn't really matter. Other than that, awesome :D