Description

This is my first build since a very long time. Ever since I sold my last desktop from the Ivy Bridge era I used my trustworthy laptop for everything. Recently I started using more and more demanding apps, occasionally play some games and got tired of the fan whining of my laptop, so I decided to build a desktop again. I was also really curious about the 3rd gen Ryzens.

I wanted a relatively small form factor with support for full ATX for not much money. I allocated roughly $1000. As a basis I went with the "SFX width" Thermaltake Core G3 case with a standing GPU config. With the given amount I expected a well rounded mid-ranger with great upgrade potential. I don't mind if everything is pretty stock. I'm not so much into overclocking, not playing competitively or anything like that.

The only unpleasant surprise was that the stock AMD cooler. It is pretty loud and not so inefficient. After I assembled the whole thing and used a while with that, I decided that it has to be replaced. I struggled a bit what would be the best replacement as the Core G3 has only 110mm cooler clearance, until I found the Noctua D9L, which is exactly that tall: a perfect fit. Speaking of cooling, because of the relatively small volume of the case, I went with a card that has a blower config on the GPU, it's actually a Palit Super X but I couldn't find it here.

Overall I'm very satisfied with the build, it's very quiet and efficient despite the full air cooling.

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Comments

  • 4 months ago
  • 2 points

How did you update the bios so the mobo would work with the third gen cpu?

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

The mobo started properly with the pre-installed bios and the Ryzen 3600, so I just updated it with the bios bult-in quckflash. I have a 1st gen Ryzen in another setup which could have been transplanted during the upgrade, but I didn't have to use it. The mobo came with 3.20 pre-installed I believe, there was a sticker on the flash chip.

  • 4 months ago
  • 1 point

Nice build, and nice unique case never seen it before and its uniqueness is quite interesting.

+1

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

450W seems a little weak considering the recommended wattage for a 2070 super is about 650W and that a gold+ certified 650W PSU doesn't even necessarily have to be more expensive

I mean on paper your system wattage is probably around 350-400 max but 550W should be bare minimum either way