Description

My friend and I were playing some PVZ on Xbox the one day and the topic of PC gaming came up. We were pretty passive on it but eventually we started discussing actually building a PC. After about a month of research, I decided I was going to go through with it and actually build one. So I originally had a $500 build in mind(not because of a budget but because I wanted to start small) and well you guys could see how that turned out.

I bought all the parts weekly. Did not want to spend it all at once. BAD IDEA GUYS. I would not recommend buying stuff little by little. If one of the parts is defective, you're screwed out of the warranty for waiting to long. The mobo was the first thing I bought which I probably messed up because it does not have onboard usb 3.0 header. The storage, I actually got both of them on sale at Fry's for $100. The rest of the parts I just spent half a paycheck and put some on credit. It took be about a month to collect all the parts and about half a month to get time to actually build it.

When I first started the build I was pretty confident, everything was going well and then I hit a snag. When I was trying to insert the mobo into the case, it was not fitting with the standoffs. After much struggling I almost gave up but then realized that the i/o shield was not inserted properly. After everything was pretty much smooth. The most difficult was obviously wiring and trying to get good cable management.

I really only a play a few games. Smite and LoL, maybe some HIZI here and there. I spent most of my time editing pictures a running a few 3D programs. Works amazing compared to my old computer.

Overall, I am extremely happy with this first time build.

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Comments

  • 58 months ago
  • 2 points

What settings and FPS do you get on LOL

  • 58 months ago
  • 1 point

Typically, most things that you'll be plugging into the USB 3.0 jacks will go in back anyway (external drives, etc.) so that the missing motherboard header isn't that much of an issue (I'm typing this on an MSI board that is setup the same way). Like you (and me), not everyone has the money all at one time for a new build so new PCs often get purchased a piece at a time; no shame in that. I think the SSD could stand to be a little bigger, maybe a 240 or 256GB, but you should be fine for now. Looks like a good solid first build to me. :)

  • 58 months ago
  • 1 point

i might sound like I'm bashing but just some constructive criticism as a experienced builder I've always stuck with the Seagate Barracuda HDD to save some $ and dual channel 1866 ram is good but i feel like 1600's always done it for me id rather find ram with a lower latency but maybe thats just me- Good build though!!<

  • 58 months ago
  • 1 point

Actually I did get 1600's but I could not find that part here anymore so I just chose the ones that were remotely the same. You're right though, I really don't see any difference between them.

  • 58 months ago
  • 1 point

Nice build. Cable management is the worst part but, in generally you made a great job. You should be proud. i have also a AMD FX processor https://pcpartpicker.com/b/ZctJ7P with less power than yous. Anyhow, i can play everything. Spent a few months collecting the parts but is always nice to see the end of a project. I like this NZXT, it look's fine.

Have fun buddy!

  • 58 months ago
  • 1 point

Remember, there are PCI-E exansion cards that give you USB 3.0 Headers. My cheapo MoBO had only one, but I was installing a card reader as well, and it turned out after the build I needed 2. This was an affordable expansion for me, and considering how often I'm downloading pictures and file to-from my camera and phone (and how much I hate waiting on transfers), this type of upgrade is perfect. It would seem to fit on your build as well.

Something to keep in mind if you REALLY want that USB 3.0 to really do its job.