Description

Just finished this build this morning, this is a stacked build used for hosting vms for development

This has ddr3 ram and not ddr4

Recently upgraded one to ddr4 and an msi mortor motherboard

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Comments

  • 43 months ago
  • 1 point

Isn't there a way you can bolt them together instead of standing them on top of each other?

  • 43 months ago
  • 1 point

I think if you take off the bottom on one of them and the top of one of them they stack but don't bolt onto each other. Some people use the top case for water cooling and put the rest of the machine in the other case. I havnt found any instructions for actually bolting the 2 cases together

  • 43 months ago
  • 1 point

i thought that was written on the Case's manual but I haven't tried it yet personally :)

  • 43 months ago
  • 1 point

Haha it is! Just found a site that explained it as well

http://www.eteknix.com/thermaltake-core-v21-stackable-micro-atx-chassis-review/3/

I am going to bolt them together next time I am in the office, seems much better than just stacking them

  • 43 months ago
  • 1 point

yeah i believe you should really bolt them together it would be sad to hear if the one on top would topple over :D

  • 43 months ago
  • 1 point

Did you not consider more "enterprise" components for these builds? Why an i7 and not a Xeon with ECC?

If you're doing anything with VMs and SQL, I'd say ECC RAM is a pretty good requirement. I'd take the extra validation enterprise gear goes through than general consumer any day.

E3-1245v4 or 1270v5 would have done the job for this, IMO.

  • 43 months ago
  • 1 point

This was for a small business, for what they need it for this fits the bill. Xeons and ecc ram are great but they have used I7 servers for the last 3 years for the same purpose and we havnt seen any draw backs of using non ecc ram On their servers. Not to mention it runs 3 virtual machines in hyperv super smooth, when logged in remotely it feels like you are on a real desktop, no lag. I only recommend Xeon processors if for some reason they need a lot of vms on one machine (support of more than one processor) or are doing some complex calculations for financials etc. for a simple web application like theirs it really isn't worth going Xeon level until they need more than one processor on one machine

  • 43 months ago
  • 1 point

are both PC running from a same PSU or they are independent?

any plans of running a UPS?

i not sure if you heard of the Skylake cant run DDR3 bull crap but looks like you have no issues running DDR3

  • 43 months ago
  • 1 point

Different psu, one is running a thermaltake psu, I havnt heard skylake can't run on ddr3, some reviews even recommend ddr3 because it isn't worth going ddr4 if you have left over ddr3 ram. The specs of this motherboard state this one only uses ddr3, there are some other motherboards that run ddr3 for skylake as well. I did my research and we didn't go ddr4 because from benchmarks there really isn't much gain in performance (not enough to throw away 32gb of ram atleast). Also not shown is a cyberpower ups which backs up these machines in the event of power failure.

  • 43 months ago
  • 1 point

Just did a search on the subject and it looks like the ddr3 and skylake noise was cleared up in this forum with people who have more technical knowledge in the matter than me.

https://linustechtips.com/main/topic/524845-will-my-skylake-cpu-die-with-ddr3/

  • 43 months ago
  • 1 point

i happen to be from the forums

yes one of our guys there confirmed he is using DDR3 with no issues

i wonder who was the one spreading those rumors saying the Memory controller in the CPU will burn up by using DDR3 sort of bull crap.

I do have a ton of DDR3 sticks from old HP machines and i could make RAM disk out of them

1333MHz 2GB sticks.

  • 43 months ago
  • 2 points

I think Intel warned about using ddr3 according to articles but cannot find any article on Intels site that actually states ddr3 will damage the chip. The weird thing is the motherboard manufactures all list ddr3 as supported on their websites and manuals. Truthfully even if it does matter, it doesn't sound like it will matter until 3-4 years of constantly using the chip and by then most of us will have upgraded to a new chip. I also have another i7 skylake that was running since February 24/7 with ddr3 and no problems.

  • 43 months ago
  • 1 point

Yup. If mobo manufacturers allows DDR3. it the risk that they have to bear to the consumers.

  • 43 months ago
  • 1 point

No real mention of it in motherboard documents or on Intel's website. Double checked the ram sticks today in the machine (for my sanity) and they are 1.35V which is DDR3L voltage, maybe they are older which is why they are not labeled as DDR3L. On Corsair's website they are DDR3L though, http://www.corsair.com/en-us/vengeance-lp-8gb-1x8gb-ddr3l-dram-1600mhz-c9-memory-kit-cml8gx3m1c1600c9r

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

Hey bro, you are not running your ram on dual channel, you have to place it spaced by 1 slot, you are losing a lot of ram speed without doing that.

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  • 43 months ago
  • 2 points

There's a description up there.

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  • 43 months ago
  • 1 point

lol

  • 43 months ago
  • 1 point

They both run hyper v for machines that host Sql databases. Top one is hosting a web application and the bottom is hosting the same application but is used for testing purposes (gives us a sandbox to try things on)

Can't run benchmarks on this one sadly because it is a client machine that is live currently

  • 43 months ago
  • 2 points

I'm learning how to use mysql at school at the moment :-) (it's quite easy)

  • 43 months ago
  • 2 points

Its a great thing to learn, keep at it, tons of companies have data but don't know what to do with it.