Description

This build was done as a migration from my last build as I ended up wanting a SFF build. for ease of portability as well as decreasing the footprint of my system given my limited space. I initially wanted a Parvum Systems case, but after seeing JayzTwoCents' review of their cases decided to go with something that could hold up better to traveling. The Enermax Liqtech 240 is the best built AIO cooler I've used to date and has an aesthetic that is equally pleasing. It has great reviews including one done by JayzTwoCents. I picked it for for the reasons stated above as well as to give another brand a chance to impress me the way Corsair has with their AIO coolers.
The only note I will make that is particular to my configuration is that the placement of the CPU power connector on this board made it impossible to connect while the cooler and fans were installed because the lip on it is facing the wrong direction. This means the clip on the power connector faces toward the cooler rather than away, so I had actually break the clip off of the connector on the cable and file it down a little to get it to fit. This isn't really an issue though since these connectors usually fit pretty snug anyway. I have yet to have to connector even become slightly loose or out of place. I also chose this board so that I could use an internal wireless card. I swapped out the stock card for a newer one made by Intel that I have listed in my parts list. I chose that adapter because of good reviews and wireless AC, plus Intel is usually pretty good about keeping their drivers updated unlike other companies... coughASUScough

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Comments

  • 48 months ago
  • 1 point

Not bad, but why the WD Greens?

What are your thoughts on the CPU cooler?

  • 48 months ago
  • 1 point

At the time I bought the green drives, they were the cheapest 2TB storage drives I could get because they were on sale. I've had them since 2011 when the flooding overseas happened and the prices of hard drives skyrocketed. They are really mostly for storage and media playback and therefore don't see a ton of use. I didn't really need anything performance oriented for them to serve their purpose. As for the cooler, it performs very much like its Corsair and Coolermaster counterparts but exceeds both by a wide margin in terms of build quality. I also managed to get this one on sale for around $50-$60 after MIR. The fans are pretty cool because they each have a selector switch on them that changes the performance setting of the fan. It definitely is worth the money, more so than the others if you ask me. The build quality is much better than the others and the performance is roughly the same if not slightly better.

  • 48 months ago
  • 1 point

Oh, I see

Thanks for the feedback on the CP cooler

  • 48 months ago
  • 1 point

No problem. Let me know if you have other questions and I'll try my best to answer.

  • 48 months ago
  • 1 point

Ok, thanks :)

  • 48 months ago
  • 0 points

This seems like a nice high end gaming pc id remove the extra storage tho 2TB + 500GB SSD works for me, liked how the fans work ( u explained in a comment) but why do you use i5 instead of i7? Its just 100~$ change for a much better cpu. Can i go for that with this build (price wouldnt change when i remove extra storage. Also wouldnt it be better to have a bigger case just asking ? im not that experienced in building systems. And last but not least, are you happy with the soundblaster? Is it worth the money?

  • 48 months ago
  • 3 points

The performance difference between an i7 and an i5 is really only about 10% and is even less in the real world when it comes to gaming. The extra $100 for a couple fps simply isn't worth the cost in my mind. This difference is true even with the skylake processors. In reality, an i5 is simply an i7 with a lower clockspeed and with hyperthreading disabled. That's it. People buy the i7 processors for extreme overclocking and bragging rights really. Not many applications take advantage of hyperthreading, and even when they do, its benefit is pretty marginal. if you're really doing things that require more than 4 cores, going with a 5820 or better is a much better option. If all you're planning on doing is gaming, an i5 is more than enough. Overclocking processors is pretty much outmoded in our day because the processors are fast enough at stock speeds and games don't benefit too much from processor speed anyway (to a point). The smaller case is really nice for portability but you do trade expandability and ease of working to get that portability. I have owned both full towers and mid towers and I can tell you, I would still pick this over them. You only build it once, and after that, you really won't do much work to it so that extra space that was nice to have for building becomes a giant inconvenience in terms of how much space the case takes and what a pain it is to move around. I've also found that I never even come close to utilizing all the space within larger cases. They're awesome for multi-GPU setups and watercooling, but more often than not you're better off going with a single GPU that's more powerful anyway because it's more cost effective. In the end, it's really all about preference and what you intend to use the machine to do. I don't take mine a ton of places, but when I do, its small size sure makes it easy and it takes up substantially less space in my room to the point where I can finally put it on my desk rather than on the floor. Lastly, the soundblaster. I have always had sound cards because when I first started building a little over 10 years ago, onboard audio was complete garbage. It's come a long way since then and many of my friends have abandoned sound cards in favor of on-board audio. Again, this comes down to preference. As much as Creative pisses me off with pretty much all of their software and drivers being either broken or outdated, I still love the options I get with their audio devices and the level of control I have to customize my experience. Some motherboards even come with soundblaster chips built into them rather than Realtek (I know some MSI boards do because my last one did). Honestly, I would try out the on-board audio first and see how you like it, then get a sound card if it doesn't cut it. If you're on a budget, I'd definitely pass on the sound card until you have some extra cash to buy one. The nice thing about them is that you can hang on to them for quite a while so you don't have to buy another one.