Description

gaming system I've been steadily updating over a period of years. just swapped from my old define R4 case with a crappy AIO water cooler to this define S and a swiftech. Next upgrade will be new mobo/ram/CPU but that'll be a while, as the i5 3570k still performs just fine for all of my tasks.

Comments

  • 49 months ago
  • 3 points

Cable management is good inside the case out outside :(

  • 49 months ago
  • 1 point

Good thing that outside of the case airflow is a non-issue in here :D

  • 48 months ago
  • 2 points

Lots of SSDs. Awesome upgrades and the gpu looks perfectly level +1

  • 49 months ago
  • 1 point

Bottleneck Alert

  • 49 months ago
  • -3 points

That CPU is going to bottleneck your GPU pretty hard... Most recent games that will make use of that 980TI power will also require a powerful CPU to back them up. It is due to the fact that they are usually console ports and they use APUs instead of dedicated CPU/GPU combo. Fallout 4, for example, recommends an I7-4790 paired to a GTX780. Overall it's a good build, I just feel like you would have been better off with an I7-4790k and a GTX980 to balance them out.

  • 49 months ago
  • 2 points

the motherboard/cpu combo is several years old -- this is just an image of a rebuild I did the other day. bringing the case and cooler up to a better standard for when I do make the leap to an i7 in the near future. I haven't run into any issues from a CPU bottleneck with the 4.3ghz overclock, I run fallout 4 at 2k at 50-60fps.

  • 49 months ago
  • 4 points

You really can't listen to these people...

  • 49 months ago
  • 1 point

I haven't played Fallout 4 on PC yet, so I was only stating what Bethesda said. The 3570k is still a great CPU, don't get me wrong. I failed to read the description, so that's why I got confused. I thought it was just another new build, in which case this choice would've been questionable, but in the current situation, it's more than ok :). For now it probably isn't being a problem, since you make upgrades regularly, you'll upgrade it when it needs to be!

  • 49 months ago
  • 2 points

Yeah, just so you know the biggest difference between the i7 and i5 processors is cache size and hyperthreading support. Very few games utilize hyperthreading (virtual cores are extremely useful in productivity applications, however) and the benefits of a larger cache depend on the game. The concept of the system bottleneck is a valid one - and if I kept my processor at stock clock speeds it certainly could present an issue - but with an ample overclock and cooling even the older i5 2500k CPUs are still capable of handling virtually anything modern games throw at them. It's fun and cool to have the latest and greatest in tech, but the benefits of an i7 over an i5 in gaming are generally exaggerated by people. The amount of overhead available for overclocking on i5 processors makes them much better picks for gamers trying to keep cost down and performance up. I will be stepping up to an i7 eventually, as I do use my computer for productivity purposes - but probably will wait for another generation before doing so.

I'm 29 and I've been building PCs since I was 12 years old, probably the most important thing I've learned is to not buy the hype on top of the line products. Price to performance ratio is always to be observed and respected -- as are real world benchmarks.

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