Description

This is another one of those builds that I did for someone else. While they were pretty receptive to my suggestions, there were some things they weren't willing to budge on. The budget was a fairly strict $500, but they insisted on 8GB of RAM, an SSD, a 1TB HDD, and Windows 7. Because of these constraints, I had to skimp in some of the other areas, which is why this build might seem a bit unbalanced.

Generally speaking, this build is meant to be a mom 'n' pop PC, mostly web browsing, storing photos and the like. There will be some gaming, but no AAA titles or anything graphically demanding (that I'm aware of).

The parts overall are pretty run of the mill, not much of note. The case was not the best. Not awful, but not that great. The intake fan is 120mm, but the exhaust is only 80mm (with a 92mm possible in the same location). I cut my finger good at one point (though I hear that's good luck), and had difficulty squeezing the HDD in with the cables, RAM, and CPU heatsink/fan. There is essentially no room for cable management behind the motherboard tray, so I did what I could, bundling up the cables and tucking them away above the DVD drive and all that. Certainly not my best cable management, but it seemed like airflow should be sufficient. The DVD drive and card reader were harvested from their old Dell, and they bought all the parts themselves, so I don't have prices. Again, I reference my opening paragraph if you'd like to criticize my parts choices and price to performance ratios. They were coming from a dual-core no-SSD unit. This one should last them a good while, and still has room to upgrade should they so choose, so while I wouldn't say I'm happy with this build, I am content.

Comments

  • 71 months ago
  • 2 points

Solid build and part choice (given the circumstances they wanted)!

  • 71 months ago
  • 2 points

Oh and you really should not use 1333Mhz ram with a apu, Try 1866 or 2133+

  • 71 months ago
  • 5 points

1333Mhz ram to 2133Mhz ram is the difference between 20FPS and 50FPS

  • 71 months ago
  • 0 points

Strict budget unfortunately. Don't think there's a 8GB kit of 2133 ram out there for $77.

  • 71 months ago
  • 2 points

Thank you for proving my point lol

  • 71 months ago
  • 1 point

Wasn't debating your point.

  • 71 months ago
  • 1 point

It's not a high-end APU. It's not primarily a gaming machine. I didn't have final say in parts. Budget considerations.

  • 71 months ago
  • 0 points

Irrelevant to the build's purpose.

  • 71 months ago
  • 1 point

Nice job on the price! How is the case?

  • 71 months ago
  • 1 point

As in the description, it was probably my least favorite component. Not awful, but a bit difficult to work with. I have a feeling there are better quality cases out there, but you'll end up paying more for that quality.

  • 71 months ago
  • 1 point

True.

  • 71 months ago
  • 1 point

You could always throw in a radeon graphics card and crossfire with the apu if you need to upgrade

  • 71 months ago
  • 1 point

After I completed the build, that was one of my two recommendations, should they ever desire an upgrade (the other being faster RAM, of course). I probably would recommend ignoring the crossfire capabilities and go with a better GPU in this case, though.

  • 71 months ago
  • 1 point

Those were some pretty tight restrictions, so good job on getting them a PC that fits the bill and comes close to budget, while actually probably exceeding their needs by a good margin.

I do have to ask, though - why did you not opt for a less expensive case, or or go for a single stick of 8Gb RAM to get in under the $500 mark?

  • 71 months ago
  • 1 point

RAM is very important for an APU's performance so dual channel is much better.

  • 71 months ago
  • 2 points

Well, he already went for 1333Mhz RAM, so I don't think optimizing APU performance was exactly a priority, lol.

  • 71 months ago
  • 1 point

I'm fairly certain the case was at a deep discount at the time of purchase.

  • 71 months ago
  • 1 point

OH, so these prices are not in fact representative of what you paid? You know, you can set them to whatever you want, to reflect what you paid...

  • 71 months ago
  • 2 points

As I said in the description, I didn't do the purchasing myself. I gave them a recommended parts list, which they took and altered slightly. I could change the prices to what I think they paid, but that didn't seem like the right way to go.

  • 71 months ago
  • 2 points

Thanks for the clarification. Didn't mean to come off as abrasive, but I think I did, so I apologize.

Do you mind if I ask whether this is sort of a home business for you? I kinda do this as a home business from time to time as the opportunity arises, but I'm always looking for strategies to make it happen a little more often!

  • 71 months ago
  • 1 point

All good, brother! I just see so many comments in so many completed builds where people seem to look at the CPU/GPU, browse the thumbnails, and then fire off comments, I was a little quick on the trigger there too.

I don't treat it as a business just yet. I think of it more as a hobby that I get to share with people. Sometimes, they pay me, but right now I just don't feel right asking for money. I don't feel like my skills, especially on the software side, are up to a level where I can say "My time is worth $XX.XX/hr." All I do is put the word out. If someone is talking about computers, I will jump in the conversation. I try to build systems in my spare time that will appeal to a more general consumer, rather than the hardcore gamers. We're awesome, don't get me wrong. There just aren't enough of us where I feel like there will be a market for a high-end system.

One thing I've been learning the hard way is to be patient. I thought I could build a respectable rig at a low price and turn a quick profit. People are savvy. I'm also not exactly in a population hub (Northeast Wisconsin). I'll keep plugging away, though, and sometimes that's all you have to do. If you enjoy it, and you keep getting better, and you keep taking pride in your work, you have to think it will pan out eventually. Hell, you could take that advice and apply it to any line of work. I should write that down and repeat it to my son when he gets older...

Where was I? Oh yeah, stay outta my booze.