Description

Hello fellow PC Enthusiasts!

I built this PC for a friend of mine who does Twitch streaming. He mostly does console streaming (WiiU and 3DS) but is looking at potentially doing some PC gaming in the future. He asked me to help him build something for under $1,000 USD that might fit his needs and I was more than happy to help! I used this opportunity to build in a case that I've been wanting to get my hands on for a while so I was super excited! Feel free to leave comments and ask me any questions about the build!

Thanks!

CPU: I went with the 4790K because he wanted the PC to have lots of potential for multitasking (hyperthreading) and be overclockable. He also had some headroom in his budget and I felt like this was the best use of money since a GPU wasn't in the works for the initial build. It overclocked like a champ at a stable 4.7GHz and is staying nice and cool under PassMark tests at 69*C.

CPU Cooler: I went with the H55 because it was on sale for about $50 through Amazon and since I have Prime it was free 2 day delivery! I've used other Corsair AIO liquid coolers (the H100i) in the past and they're always pretty easy to setup, this one was no exception. After reading the instruction manual on which parts to use it was relatively straightforward to install. The only issue I ran into was I had originally planned to have it setup as an exhaust on the back of the case. Unfortunately, the radiator and hoses would not fit in the rear section of the case so I instead opted to install it on the side of the case as in intake along with a second LED AF120 next to it. It's worked out well and keeps the CPU relatively cool for it's size, very satisfied.

Motherboard: I wanted a Z97 board that wasn't too pricey but still had a good amount of features. I went with the Gigabyte Gaming 5 because it was the cheapest most feature rich mITX board I could find, plus it matched the Black and Red (I know so original) color scheme I had going on.

Memory: I had two 4GB sticks of Corsair Vengeance Pro lying around from a previous build so I figured I'd save him $80 and throw it in there. It works great and after installing some drivers the MOBO is reading their clock speeds correctly.

Storage: I'm usually a Western Digital guy when it comes to 3.5 inch HDD's but the Seagate Barracuda was a steal. 2TB at 7200RPM's and it was under $80. From what I hear the Seagate brand is pretty reliable these days so we'll see how it works out!

PSU: Corsair CX430, not much else to say other than it was relatively cheap and it's reliable. I've used this exact same PSU in my wife's computer and I used a CX750 in my previous build, they've both been great so I feel good about this one!

Case: My favorite part of the build!! I've seen some other builds online with this case but I feel like it has so much more potential, so i wanted to get my hands on it to see what it was like. I was not dissapointed! This is a seriously feature rich case and Corsair did not skimp out on build quality either. The cable management options were plentiful for a mITX case and the added in feature of having the space for a 200mm intake fan was something I HAD to check out. The pictures seriously do not give this case justice, it looks AWESOME in person. I highly recommend it for the gamer on the go or someone that likes having the ease of access that this case affords with it's design.

Case Fans: Red red red! I wanted to cram as much flashiness into this case as I could since the last build I did wasn't very flashy due to budget constraints. I went with two LED AF120 fans (one as an intake in the side and one as an exhaust in the back), a Corsair SP120 for the radiator intake and a 200mm BitFenix Spectre Pro for the front intake. This fan is a monster! It's as large as the motherboard and only turns on when the case fan profile is on the highest setting! Luckily the LED's stay fully lit even if it isn't spinning. They definitely add a bit of awesomeness that wouldn't have been there with stock fans.

GPU: No GPU yet! He wanted to have the computer be something that he could expand upon himself in the future so we left the GPU out of the budget for now. He has his sights set on a 970 of some sort and I think that MSI's offering might be the best fit for the build so I'll keep all of you updated!

I'm shipping it off to him in a few days and I'll post updates if anything new happens, thanks for reading!

P.S. Here's a link to his Twitch Channel http://www.twitch.tv/bowserzero

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Comments

  • 63 months ago
  • 2 points

Nice build! Any reason you used one Bitfenix and one Corsair fan? Both are good fans. Wish he would have added a few more watts on the PSU, although the Corsair is a solid unit, especially for the money.

  • 63 months ago
  • 1 point

Great question! I couldn't find a Corsair model 200mm red LED Fan for the front so I went with the BitFenix one! That's really my only reasoning, it would have been nice to keep them all the same brand but it's all good. Also, the wattage on the PSU should be more than sufficient, I always see these gaming builds with 700+ watt PSU's, people spending upwards of $150 and in reality it's totally overkill lol Even with just the CX430 he should be able to throw a GTX970 or even a GTX980 since the new 900 series is so power efficient. But as it stands he has no plans of putting a GPU in there yet so it's all good lol

Thanks for the feedback!

  • 63 months ago
  • 2 points

http://www.realhardtechx.com/index_archivos/Page362.htm

Just to chime in and let you know, that 430W would really only be good for a 960 or under to be safe. Here's a list of AMD and Nvidia graphics cards and their respective "power requirements". Now, you probably could get by the a 970 on 430W no problem, but just to be safe, I personally would say it should at least be 500W. Just thought I'd mention it. This is a SERIOUSLY beautiful build though, great job! +1

  • 63 months ago
  • 2 points

It all depends on the quality of the power supply. When they give a requirement listing, they usually use a rating from a low quality generic brand of PSU so they can cover themselves in case someone does end up overloading the power supply.

  • 63 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks for the info! I t would seem that the sources I've been using have conflicting information lol As a side note, my wife has been using a 770 in her build and it's using the same CX430 but according to this chart she should be using something with at least 575 watts. There seems to be a lot of misinformation out there about what is "recommended" and what is actually "required" wattage for system components; I feel like some manufacturers air on the side of overpowering just in case. For the time being this PSU should be just fine but if he decides on going for a GTX 980 or higher I'll just "recommend" that he replaces the PSU with something more powerful lol

P.S. Heres a link to a video of a guy powering his 980 with a 450 watt PSU; with the CPU and GPU under full load (with all USB ports powering external peripherals) never goes above 330 watts lol Just some food for thought! =) http://youtu.be/hOuMGhgIXGQ

  • 63 months ago
  • 2 points

I agree, honestly it's just a chart I like to go by when putting together builds, it allows for upgrading of more powerful components in the future if someone plans on it. But like you said, there is a lot of conflicting information out there about it and I really don't think you need a 500W PSU, it was just a thought lol. Thanks for the video though, that's quite an interesting find. How do you go about finding what wattage your components are putting out in total? I'd be interested to see what mine is using.

  • 63 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks for the feedback! It's good to see that we can have a civilized back and forth about this without it turning into a bloodbath like I've seen on other threads lol

I generally use something like a wattmeter (similar to the one used in that video) to determine how much power is being drawn. It's not a direct translation (there is actually less power being used on the DC side due to inductive and capacitive reactance) but it's the closest thing to a real time representation of the power draw that your system is putting out lol

Here's a link! http://www.amazon.com/P3-P4400-Electricity-Usage-Monitor/dp/B00009MDBU

  • 63 months ago
  • 2 points

What's your voltage on you CPU?

  • 63 months ago
  • 2 points

After seeing a clean build like yours, I'm really starting to like this case. Good job!

  • 63 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks!! I really appreciate it! The case was loads of fun to work with!

  • 63 months ago
  • 2 points

Very beautiful case. Clean and lighted quite well. +1

  • 56 months ago
  • 2 points

Hey question for ya...Were you able to use the same fan screws when you swapped in that BitFenix 200mm? I bought a Cooler Master Mega Flow yesterday and sadly the screws are not long enough. The fan has a thickness of 30mm and the screws just wont reach :-(

  • 56 months ago
  • 1 point

Yup, I just used the normal fan screws but I screwed them on from the case to the fan, kinda backwards I guess but it worked!

  • 61 months ago
  • 1 point

I see you love your red...