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Fractal Design Define C TG / MSI X399 Gaming Pro Carbon Live Build

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Post

BoyScout Sept. 18, 2017

Update: The Stream is over! Thanks for everyone who joined in the fun. If you missed it, you can watch the archive on Twitch or YouTube. You can also check out benchmarks and more pictures in the Completed Build write-up.

Original Posting:

Join us Tuesday, September 19th at 2PM CDT on Twitch.tv for our next live build! This time we'll be building an AMD Ryzen Threadripper 1920X system using MSI's X399 Gaming Pro Carbon/AC motherboard.

Josh from Fractal Design will be stopping by as well to help us put together the system using Fractal's recently released Define C TG case and Celsius S24 CPU cooler.

A big thanks to Fractal Design for providing the case and CPU cooler, as well as to MSI for providing the motherboard and EVGA for providing the video card used in this build.

PCPartPicker part list

Type Item Price
CPU AMD - Threadripper 1920X 3.5GHz 12-Core Processor $799.99
CPU Cooler Fractal Design - Celsius S24 87.6 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler $109.99
Motherboard MSI - X399 GAMING PRO CARBON AC ATX TR4 Motherboard $349.99
Memory Corsair - Dominator Platinum 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR4-3000 Memory $189.99
Memory Corsair - Dominator Platinum 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR4-3000 Memory $189.99
Storage Samsung - 960 EVO 500GB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive $249.99
Video Card EVGA - GeForce GTX 1080 Ti 11GB SC2 ELITE GAMING Video Card $754.99
Case Fractal Design - Define C TG ATX Mid Tower Case $94.99
Power Supply EVGA - SuperNOVA G3 850W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply $129.99
Total at time of filming $2869.91

Comments Sorted by:

Crazc 4 points 2 months ago

Nice.

Apach3 3 Builds 2 points 2 months ago

i can see this being useful as a great video editing machine, maybe even capable of 4K livestreaming?

Sam_Flynn 1 Build 1 point 2 months ago

Would have added a 3tb or more SSHD in there if this was for editing or something, other than that, nice build

BoyScout staff submitter 21 Builds 1 point 2 months ago

Yep, no argument.. We kept it a bit simpler to help the live stream go faster, but a large secondary storage drive (or two) would certainly be welcome for this creator-oriented build.

orthancstone 1 point 2 months ago

Really enjoyed Josh's insight and banter during today's stream.

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StarBlazer457 1 point 2 months ago

THAT THREADRIPPER IS HUGE!!!

With that said.... Just an absolutely stunning power in a little box! Would like to see some benchmarks...

attackmoose 1 point 2 months ago

What about overclocking it to 5Ghz?

nmiyares 1 point 1 month ago

is the video posted in YouTube? I looked Yesterday and it did not seem to be there.

BoyScout staff submitter 21 Builds 1 point 1 month ago

Sorry for the delay! We hit a few snags along the way, but it's been posted to YouTube now.

nmiyares 1 point 1 month ago

Thanks...

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surefir3 1 point 1 month ago

Is there a reason over the others to get the 1920? I mean if you go all out you get 16 cores with the 1950 and the 1900 is more budget friendly and has 8 cores for plenty enough for anything even movie production at 4K can do in reasonable time with the appropriate graphics card. So the 1920 is the middle man with in between in every aspect. I mean it's good, but not the god tier 16 core beast and not cheap enough to be justified for not going all out. The build is good so obviously +1 but that chip is......well....ya.. do I have something against this card, yes, because it doesn't FIT IN

jazz_530 1 point 1 month ago

clean build

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Lexkalin 2 Builds 1 point 1 month ago

The GPU temps in this thing must be terrible. I've got ordinary Define C and EVGA 1080 FTW2 with two 140mm pwm Venturi fans as intake and one non-pwm Venturi exhaust and my temps can easily go up to high 70s or even around 80 C (e.g. witcher 3) with 78 F / 26 C ambients (fan curve tops at 70% rpm set in afterburner and it's quite audible at that point). Front-mounted radiator adds another couple degree to the restrictive front panel and dust cover. All in all the case is jut bad for high-end open-air cooled gpus.

BoyScout staff submitter 21 Builds 2 points 28 days ago

We haven't have any unusual issues with temps or performance. You can see the completed build write up for our benchmark results. We're actually using this PC as a video editing rig right now. So far it's been doing great.

Lexkalin 2 Builds 1 point 28 days ago

Video Editing is not that taxing for a gpu, hence why you didn't see any higher than average temps. The case has a good airflow fot the CPU area and that's not an issue. Try running Witcher 3 on your rig and you'll see what I mean. I did a build (https://pcpartpicker.com/b/BHWD4D) with both front-mounted (280mm) radiator aio and currently being used Thermalright True Spirit heatsink. Temps on Evga 1080 FTW2 are a bit better with heatsink due to the lack of radiator in front, but still quite warmer than average. For some reason, the air used by the gpu does not properly dissipate and gets kinda trapped in that area between psu and gpu which causes gpu to recirculate the same warm air. That was my conclusion (and not only mine, e.g. GamerNexus) and I certainly could think that 1080Ti will be even hotter in a demanding 3D workload, like same Witcher 3. But no doubt it's a great case to build in, though I'd really hope you could provide feedback to fractal on less than impressive airflow for gpu area when using open-air coolers. Sorry for a long post!

BoyScout staff submitter 21 Builds 2 points 28 days ago

Thanks for sharing your completed build, I'll check it out. While we ran a few game benchmarks on it and didn't see anything terribly unusual, I'll try out Witcher 3 to see how that one fairs and add it to our completed build write-up. We don't test the GPUs with an overclock, but with what we tested already, we were seeing reasonably expected temps (under 80C) with a power target at 100%.

Lexkalin 2 Builds 1 point 28 days ago

Thanks for replying. Good luck with your tests. Was happy to share as in my case (lol), with factory-OCed stock 1080 FTW2 I easily could hit 80-82 C in Witcher 3 (with ambient at 78F / 26 C), but as soon as I took the side panel off - I got a 5-7 C reduction and could feel where the heat was building up. This game really proved to be one of the heaviest realistic load gpu tests and temperature benchmarks. And the link I provided to my build was just to prove it's a clean, similar build with no obstruction with same 2 intake fan / 1 exhaust configuration. Will be looking forward to see any updates.

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IncognitoGamer123 -3 points 2 months ago

Is the 1080 Ti a bottleneck for the 1920x?

BoyScout staff submitter 21 Builds 2 points 2 months ago

It'd be tough to call the 1080 Ti a bottleneck, as it's one of the most powerful GPU's currently available in the consumer space. While, technically speaking, it will be the limiting factor for gaming performance, that "limit" will generally be 4K/60+FPS gaming under max settings ... if the benchmarks hold with similar systems we've tested in the past.

As much as many a gamer might dream of it, a high core count system like this isn't typically looked at solely for gaming. If you only wanted a gaming PC, you could get similar performance (at least with most games) for a lot less.

So while it will certainly operate with ease under modern gaming scenarios, Ryzen Threadripper CPU's are primarily targeted at high end creative applications (3D modeling/video rendering/editing) or any other intensive processing applications that leverage the high core count (often along with lots of memory) more effectively than their lower core-count cousins (such as the Ryzen 3/5/7 processors) could do.

Anyway, be sure to check back later -- we'll be posting a Completed Build with some benchmarks that can offer more details on how the ultimately system performs past the one 3DMark result we had time to run during the live stream.

IncognitoGamer123 1 point 2 months ago

Thank you for clearing this up and not being like the other guys.

BoyScout staff submitter 21 Builds 2 points 2 months ago

No worries -- sorry I missed your question when you first posted it. Hope my answer was helpful!

IncognitoGamer123 2 points 2 months ago

It was very helpful, thank you.

surefir3 1 point 1 month ago

No, and same the other way around. If a 1070 can run 4K on low and medium settings at 60fps with a few dips...and a 1080ti can run 4K ultra on AAA at 144fps It isn't a bottle neck.

Also the CPU definitely can't bottle neck if even the 1300x isn't a bottle neck for the 1070. So obviously a 12 core with a higher standard boost clock of 4.0 isn't going to be a problem at all either

The only thing they may ever consider is if they are doing extreme editing of very big files like 8k video. Then they may consider a p6000 for the extra gbs.

surefir3 1 point 1 month ago

Honestly intel is better optimized for gaming with 4 core at high clock rates (coffee lake is 6 cores, but that doesn't matter really) games don't use all 12 cores of this threadripper, in fact it actually reduces performance because the CPU copies info to the other cores regardless. Slowing the system overall. That's why there is a gaming mode on the threadripper settings (I know for zens it's called ryzen master, but I don't know what the threadripper one is) this basically shuts down an entire die so the CPU doesn't have that issue, so after that it's like a coffee lake that came out early and was way underclocked. However these have good temps and could easily catch up to a 7700 in speeds.

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