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Help a newbie out version 2.0 :D

Hamadiar
  • 57 months ago

Hello. I've been browsing this website and so far I find it amazing. I was told to come here for some answers. What im wondering is that how do I know the compatibility on the different parts (besides a website telling you if they are compatible), I want to learn why if any of you could help me with a build and explain it. I have a budget of 1000$. A gaming pc. I need a 1080 around 17-22inc screen and I want to have windows as operating system. I dont know what it means by "location" but I live in Sweden. I have some basic knowledge but please explain why you are choosing there parts. Thank you beforehand! :D

Comments

  • 57 months ago
  • 1 point

theres no site list for sweden (upper right corner) you would need to provide websites you can buy from or use amazon international shipping

  • 57 months ago
  • 1 point

Hey bud! Does it matter what size case or motherboard you want? like ATX or mATX or even mini-itx EDIT: I will give you parts lists for prices in America since I cannot find a Swedish site

  • 57 months ago
  • 1 point

Well, since you're in Sweden, this list probably won't be too helpful as far as actual purchasing of components is concerned. But it will be helpful for learning the process of choosing build components.

The first place to start is by evaluating your needs: If you're gaming, you'll want at least a quad core, and if you're looking to simultaneously stream and game, you'll need more than 4 threads. You'll also want more than 4 threads for things like rendering, heavy video editing, or anything that enters the "workstation" realm of computers.

Since pretty much everyone on this website is here for gaming builds, I usually just assume that that's the case. So I went with the popular (and pretty much gaming standard) i5-4690k. It's a quad core processor with the ability to overclock, so I included a cpu cooler as well. I went with the cryorig h7 air cooler because air coolers are less expensive and last longer than liquid coolers, and the h7 is a great balance of capability, quietness, and cost. Another common (and good) choice is the Hyper 212 EVO.

From there I went to the PSU. It's a very important part that should not ever be cheaped on, so I always make sure to only choose the most reliable units. 550w is a common amount for a low- to mid-power gaming build, so I went with the cheapest reliable 550w I could, the XFX TS 550w. From there, I went to motherboard.

For the motherboard, there are 3 main considerations: socket type, chipset, and form factor. Luckily, this website filters compatibility for socket type very well. Since I went with the Haswell i5, I went with an LGA-1150 motherboard. Also since it's haswell, it runs on the Intel H97 (or Z97 for overclocking) chipset. Since the processor is unlocked, we'd need an LGA-1150 Z97 motherboard to utilize the processor's full potential. After that, I decided to look at the MicroATX form factor (ATX is more common) so that I could go with a specific case that I had in mind. It's important to choose a reliable motherboard, and knowing the difference just comes with exposure and time. So to make a long story short, I went with the Gigabyte.

After choosing a motherboard, I move onto ram. ddr3 is the type of ram that's supported with the lga-1150 motherboard, so I went with the common clock speed of 160MHz. I always make sure to pick a low-cas latency set of ram, so that I can be sure I didn't select a slow set. After putting the filters for ddr3-1600 CL9 (a good low latency number), I selected 8gb, which is standard for a gaming computer. Then I just looked at the lowest price options and selected the least expensive reliable option (most ram is reliable).

For storage, I always put in at least 1TB of 7200RPM HDD storage. It's just a standard amount on here. I'll come back to storage once I get past a few other things before going over my choice of SSD.

I then went to OS. I always pick the lowest price 64-bit OS. It's all standard.

After OS, I went to monitor. Since you have a low demand for screen size, I just put in a filter for 1080p monitors and looked at the lowest-priced options. I looked for a screen size similar to what you wanted, and selected the cheapest reliable option from there (it's actually the cheapest 1080p monitor on the site, haha)

And lastly, the all-important video card. The GPU is a vital part of any gaming PC, so I always make sure to do this step either first or last, depending on the needs of the build and the budget. Knowing the best choice of card is a huge balance of a bunch of variables and preferences, so I'll just make it short and say the 380 was the best choice for this budget. It's a very well-balanced card that will offer great 1080p performance and will be able to play most games at high settings and high fps.

After adding the 380, I noticed there was still some budget left to spend. I decided to go ahead and add in the particular case idea I had from earlier, and went with the Thermaltake. It's a very nice small-form factor case (it's microATX).

After the thermaltake, there was still some budget, so I decided to look at a solid state boot drive. It makes the computer feel very responsive and quick, so it's nice to have if the budget allows it. 120gb is a standard starting point for SSDs, as it allows space for OS and one or two games. It also just so happens to be right around how much budget was left. I went with the Adata because it is the cheapest reliable 120gb SSD. Unfortunately, it just barely took me over the $1000 budget limitation, but the SSD is a good option if the extra budget can be met. If not, I could change up the choice in case and motherboard to get the rest of the cost lowered so that the budget is met.

And here it all is. I hope the explanation was helpful!

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU Intel Core i5-4690K 3.5GHz Quad-Core OEM/Tray Processor $225.99 @ SuperBiiz
CPU Cooler CRYORIG H7 49.0 CFM CPU Cooler $34.50 @ Newegg
Motherboard Gigabyte GA-Z97MX-Gaming 5 Micro ATX LGA1150 Motherboard $123.99 @ SuperBiiz
Memory Crucial Ballistix Sport 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory $37.99 @ Amazon
Storage A-Data Premier Pro SP600 128GB 2.5" Solid State Drive $47.99 @ Amazon
Storage Seagate Barracuda 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $46.99 @ Amazon
Video Card MSI Radeon R9 380 2GB Video Card $199.98 @ SuperBiiz
Case Thermaltake Core V21 MicroATX Mini Tower Case $58.99 @ NCIX US
Power Supply XFX 550W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply $55.99 @ SuperBiiz
Operating System Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 OEM (64-bit) $87.99 @ NCIX US
Monitor AOC E2260SWDN 60Hz 21.5" Monitor $89.99 @ Newegg
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $1010.39
Generated by PCPartPicker 2015-09-17 16:04 EDT-0400
  • 57 months ago
  • 1 point

A budget of € 1000 without the Monitor & OS will get u the top-performer & the latest DDR4 RAM based, skylake build, the 6th Gen i5 & i7 as seen in their name codes i5-6600k & i7-6700k..

The DDR4 skylake is better than the DDR3 Haswell Z97 by a long margin in all benchmarks including Gaming:

http://us.hardware.info/comparisontable/products/220716-315137-315132

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU Intel Core i5-6600K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor €271.29 @ Mindfactory
CPU Cooler Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler €36.50 @ Amazon Deutschland
Motherboard Asus Z170-P ATX LGA1151 Motherboard €118.51 @ Mindfactory
Memory Kingston FURY 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR4-2400 Memory €63.59 @ Mindfactory
Storage Seagate Barracuda 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive €53.43 @ Mindfactory
Video Card XFX Radeon R9 390 8GB Double Dissipation Video Card €327.84 @ Mindfactory
Case NZXT S340 (Black) ATX Mid Tower Case €82.73 @ Mindfactory
Power Supply XFX TS 650W 80+ Gold Certified ATX Power Supply €76.83 @ Mindfactory
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total €1030.72
Generated by PCPartPicker 2015-09-17 23:22 CEST+0200

If u need an all-inclusive within the € 1K, then something like the DDR 3 build fellway proposed would be more suited.. You see for a 100-200 € difference, there is a large step-up in performance if there is a platform change (like here in this instance ..)

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