add arrow-down arrow-left arrow-right arrow-up authorcheckmark clipboard combo comment delete discord dots drag-handle dropdown-arrow errorfacebook history inbox instagram issuelink lock markup-bbcode markup-html markup-pcpp markup-cyclingbuilder markup-plain-text markup-reddit menu pin radio-button save search settings share star-empty star-full star-half switch successtag twitch twitter user warningwattage weight youtube

Coming home after a long 7 month tour.

SemperPC
  • 56 months ago

Good morning/afternoon/evening everyone!

I am a U.S. Marine coming back to the states after a 7 month deployment and am need of assistance. I have asked for help before but that was initially for ideas. My main goal is to come back and build a computer that will not only last, but can run everything at ultra high settings and get at least 70+ fps. Considering I have been out the PC circle jerk for a while, I have literally no idea what I am doing, so I hope my fellow PC brethren can help! A few notes that should be taken is that i am short of space because I have to share a room with someone, so I was thinking a mini-itx build, but it does not really matter as long as it is portable considering I will have to move it around here and there. CSGO and LoL are my go to games, but when I want to play something that is graphics intensive, I want it to handle well.

Budget: No more than $2500, but I would like to go at a sweet $1700.

Location: US

Use (Gaming, Rendering, etc): I primarily game with the occasional video editing in After Effects/photoshop.

Peripherals required (monitor, keyboard/mouse, etc): I currently am looking for a monitor that can handle 144hz and 1ms response time, so the ASUS VG248QE 24 caught my attention with the cheap price of $250, but I am not overall sold yet.

Operating System required: Windows 10, 7, as long as it's not 8...

I hope everyone stays positive and has a great day. "There is always someone out there who is having a rougher time than you."

Comments

  • 56 months ago
  • 4 points

Howdy Semper,

Thank you for serving.


Here's a neat idea for a nice little gaming computer:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU Intel Core i7-6700 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor $325.99 @ B&H
CPU Cooler Silverstone AR05 40.2 CFM CPU Cooler $34.99 @ Amazon
Motherboard ASRock H170M-ITX/ac Mini ITX LGA1151 Motherboard $109.99 @ SuperBiiz
Memory G.Skill NT Series 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR4-2133 Memory $94.99 @ Newegg
Storage Sandisk Ultra II 480GB 2.5" Solid State Drive $139.99 @ Newegg
Storage Samsung Spinpoint M9T 2TB 2.5" 5400RPM Internal Hard Drive $94.48 @ Amazon
Video Card PowerColor Radeon R9 Nano 4GB Video Card $604.98 @ Newegg
Case Lian-Li PC-TU100B Mini ITX Tower Case $96.99 @ SuperBiiz
Power Supply Silverstone Strider Gold 450W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular SFX Power Supply $89.99 @ Amazon
Operating System Microsoft Windows 10 Home OEM (64-bit) $98.20 @ Amazon
Monitor Acer XG270HU 144Hz 27.0" Monitor $449.99 @ B&H
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $2140.58
Generated by PCPartPicker 2015-09-29 05:12 EDT-0400

Some of the things that separate this from the other builds posted thus far:

  1. It is small. Very small. Not kidding when I say, the case above is about 1/3rd the size of the smallest case advised in build's posted thus far. Doesn't hurt that it looks sort of like a steam-punk ammo-can briefcase with a handle. (portability, maximized).

  2. Free-Sync. This technology gives command of the refresh on the monitor to the GPU, so that the monitor refresh can be time-aligned to the frame-rate actually being achieved by the computer in real-time. The result is tear free gaming in the 60-144hz range in most games and conditions.


Welcome home!

Regards,

Eric

  • 56 months ago
  • 1 point

Thank you Eric! Will the size be an issue with heat?

  • 56 months ago
  • 1 point

the build made by Allan_M_Systems is definitely very nice. I have to tell you I really love the case and I almost bought it. There is just one problem with it, the heat issue with the GPU. There is a solution but I don't know if you would be willing to do it. Some ppl have mod the bottom panel to put a slim fan which will cool the GPU which is basically the problem. Here is an example of someone who did this.

http://pcpartpicker.com/b/Jtr7YJ

but it still a nice case

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mgNmBePiBaM

  • 56 months ago
  • 1 point

I honestly don't think heat is going to be a major concern. Try to do a clean build as far as the cable management is concerned and I expect it will run pretty good. The thing is, you can't go into a build like this "chasing" temperatures. The CPU and GPU have thermal margins. It is prudent here to USE the thermal margins rather than try to fight them. The more temperature differential you are willing to accept, the less air-exchange is really required. Chasing temps for the sake of temps is something a lot of us get lured into, but isn't really required. We could fire up a modern CPU and GPU under torture testing and run them at their specified maximum supported continuous operating temp for years without failure.

The R9 Nano is basically self-regulated as far as temperatures and power are concerned. Under a heavy load, it will find equilibrium with the available cooling when necessary, but more often will simply be kept in check by its very strict power envelope limitations. The architecture and fabrication scales very well in this regard. Small tradeoffs in render throughput (core clock speed and voltage are scaled down) result in large reductions in power (thermal) dissipation.

Indeed, the fury nano is probably the highest dissipation card you'll find in an ITX-length form factor. However, that power is also being dissipated from one of the largest GPU processor dies on the market (~6cm2) coupled to a sophisticated high density vapor chamber cooling system.

What this means, is that while we have a lot of power dissipation here (up to ~175-200W maximum), the actual thermal density of the GPU is very low. In fact, thermal density here is probably lower than on any GPU on the market right now. About the only thing comparable would be a reference GTX750 (or possibly a reference GTX950). Low thermal density means this is actually a very "easy" to cool GPU, that doesn't need perfect/ideal ventilation conditions to work properly. Soaking in some of its own heat isn't going to be a deal breaker here. 3rd party testing confirms that the card works as intended in SFF case's. This makes sense all things considered.

In order to deal with the CPU "soaking" in some of the GPU's heat, we have employed a compact liquid heat-pipe cooling solution. IE: AR05. This will reduce the effective thermal resistance for CPU cooling by significant margins compared to Intel's stock cooling solution. I fully expect this compensation to be more than sufficient to keep the CPU within thermal margins under any workload, even with elevated case temps.

  • 56 months ago
  • 1 point

nice build +1.. really love the case and the nano!! I would just get the 500 watts SFX-L (which I think should fit) and should also be quieter because of the larger fan (both are priced similar) ..

  • 56 months ago
  • 1 point

Funny you mention the 500W unit. The build was actually originally posted with that in it! I flip flopped like a politician trying to decide which one to go with and finally edited it to the 450W unit because of a political calculation. I figured I'd be less likely to have to explain a PSU selection that got the higher rating over at johnnyguru.

Should have focus grouped it first, lol.

Either way would work, they are both nice units with very minor trade-offs either way and plenty of power for the build.

  • 56 months ago
  • 1 point

exactly.. im using the 450 version in my build and im very happy with it (when I bought it there was no 500 or 600 version and I did get version 2.0 which has the improve fan and fan curve).

Youre right, the 450 has the higher rating of the 3 (something I don't understand from Silverstone)!!!

Only thing I dislike is that its a little loud under load but I can live with it.. I have seen some ppl mod it with the blacknoise fan (I just don't want to void my warranty).

I guess the main advantage of the 500 version is the larger fan, but the 450 unit is a better unit..

  • 56 months ago
  • 1 point

One thing I feel I need to point out is that the Nano has since lost its promotion and is back up to $650. It doesn't really change the build, but the price is now $45 higher.

Also, the XLR8 is a better and slightly cheaper SSD a much better warranty. The Ultra II was barely on-par with MX100s when it came out, where as the XLR8 trades blows with MX200s and 850 Evos.

  • 56 months ago
  • 1 point

and is back up to $650

Even though they are all reference designs, I'd probably change to a brand sporting a longer warranty with the prices all being about the same now. XFX maybe.


Also, the XLR8 is a better and slightly cheaper SSD a much better warranty.

I don't see any PNY half terabyte drives on here for less money that are actually superior. Can you post a link?


The Ultra II was barely on-par with MX100s when it came out

The MX100's are great SSDs... In a half terrabyte size there's no tangible difference between an MX100 and any modern flagship AHCI drive for single client performance.

where as the XLR8 trades blows with MX200s and 850 Evos.

That doesn't make any sense, the MX200 in many tests is no better than or worse than the MX100. You've implied that the ultra II is bad because it is like an MX100, and are implying that something good would be more like the performance of an MX200.

http://www.anandtech.com/show/9258/crucial-mx200-250gb-500gb-1tb-ssd-review/3

The 500GB MX200 and MX100 perform about the same in benchmarks.


That is all hopelessly academic anyway... Any ~500GB SSD made with technology from the last couplefew years is going to boot and load software within a sliver of each-other, even the really craptastic ones with asynchronous and/or bait-n-switch nand/controllers etc (v300coughcs1111). The protocol is the primary bottleneck for single client workloads.

  • 56 months ago
  • 1 point

I'd probably change to a brand sporting a longer warranty with the prices all being about the same now. XFX maybe.

XFX no longer does their lifetime warranties, but standard 2-year contracts which are pretty much the same as PowerColor's and Sapphire's. Asus and Gigabyte both offer three-year warranties on graphics cards.

I don't see any PNY half terabyte drives on here for less money that are actually superior. Can you post a link?

That's embarrassing. I searched for the CS1211 instead of the CS2111. :/ Serves me right for not double checking.

The MX100's are great SSDs... In a half terrabyte size there's no tangible difference between an MX100 and any modern flagship AHCI drive for single client performance.

I was not saying they were terrible. They are great drives, but SSD performance is all relative. Not that this matters any more, since was looking at the wrong drive. Thanks, PNY, for making all of your model numbers so similar.

[comment deleted]
  • 56 months ago
  • 2 points

Salute to the returning HERO & the defender of our Honour !!

You Sir, are the roof & shade over our heads.. ( A li'l too over-the-top was it ?? But nevertheless SALUTE YOU FROM THE HEART!! )

The Latest DDR4 skylake platform, IS DEFINITELY much better than the DDR3 Haswell Z97 by a long margin in all benchmarks including Gaming:

http://us.hardware.info/comparisontable/products/220716-315137

http://www.anandtech.com/bench/product/1261?vs=1544

http://cpu.userbenchmark.com/Compare/Intel-Core-i5-6600K-vs-Intel-Core-i5-4690K/3503vs2432

If u see below the 4690K, it's clearly mentioned in RED "Superseded by the intel i5-6600K"

Official intel compare, if u prefer straight from the horse's mouth:

http://ark.intel.com/compare/88184,80815

The recently announced 6-days ago, the Z170i Pro Gaming - the itx version of the highly awarded Z170 Pro gaming Motherboard's prices are set to be released soon..

http://rog.asus.com/443872015/asus-gaming-motherboards/asus-announces-z170i-pro-gaming/

A li'l over the sweet spot but the Biggest Bang for ur Buck.. Guaranteed!!

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU Intel Core i5-6600K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor $248.95 @ Amazon
CPU Cooler Noctua NH-L12 37.8 CFM CPU Cooler $60.89 @ OutletPC
Thermal Compound Coollaboratory Liquid Pro 0.15g Thermal Paste $9.88 @ OutletPC
Motherboard Asus Z170I PRO GAMING Mini ITX LGA1151 Motherboard $180.00
Memory Kingston Savage 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR4-2666 Memory $76.99 @ Newegg
Storage Samsung 850 EVO-Series 250GB 2.5" Solid State Drive $89.00 @ Amazon
Storage Seagate Barracuda 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $46.89 @ OutletPC
Video Card EVGA GeForce GTX 980 Ti 6GB Superclocked+ ACX 2.0+ Video Card $649.99 @ Newegg
Case Corsair Air 240 MicroATX Mid Tower Case $87.98 @ Newegg
Power Supply EVGA 750W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply $84.99 @ NCIX US
Operating System Microsoft Windows 10 Home OEM (64-bit) $94.89 @ OutletPC
Monitor Asus VG248QE 144Hz 24.0" Monitor $244.51 @ Amazon
Keyboard Cooler Master OCTANE Wired Gaming Keyboard w/Optical Mouse $44.99 @ Newegg
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total (before mail-in rebates) $1979.95
Mail-in rebates -$60.00
Total $1919.95
Generated by PCPartPicker 2015-09-29 02:32 EDT-0400
  • 56 months ago
  • 1 point

Thank you for your kind words and advice!

  • 56 months ago
  • 1 point

To be honest, this is exactly what I wanted. I don't know if I want this beautiful case or the Inwin 901 though... Also will moving this around mess with it somehow?

  • 56 months ago
  • 2 points

Ayy. I got over here not too long ago. Glad to hear you've made it through safely.

This is what I think you should be going with.

CPU: There's no reason within this budget you should not be able to take advantage of an unlocked CPU. You never specifically stated you're not open to overclocking, so I'll assume it's something you will do.

Were you solely interested in gaming, I'd have gone with an i5. However, with video editing and rendering on your plate I felt the extra bump in power would be useful.

SSD: The XLR8s are bulletproof. They offer great performance, have a wicked 600TB-write warranty over 4 years, and perform right between MX100s and 850 Evos. And it's inexpensive.

Case: It looks great, is feature-rich, is smaller than most mATX cases and much smaller than mid towers, and did I mention it looks great? It's not the smallest ITX case currently for sale, but it's certainly one of the best all-'rounders.

There's no window here since we're going for performance-per-dollar and not looks, but the lack of it takes nothing away from the looks.

GPU: While the R9 Nano was a thought and would have let us jump into even smaller cases, it's no better than a non-X Fury. To me that just does not justify the $100 increase in price just because it's small. You can build inside plenty of small cases while still having a full-length GPU.

Monitor: As far as Freesync monitors go, this is as good as it gets without dropping $1k on Acer's 34" Predator. It's 144Hz, is Freesync-compatible, and most importantly, is IPS. I cannot begin to describe how much I value the richness of color range and depth of IPS over standard TN displays. It's really a case of never wanting to get a TN panel ever again. It's that much better. Well worth the $100 you didn't spend on the Nano.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU Intel Core i7-6700K 4.0GHz Quad-Core Processor $350.00 @ Amazon
CPU Cooler CRYORIG H7 49.0 CFM CPU Cooler $34.50 @ Newegg
Motherboard ASRock Z170M-ITX/ac Mini ITX LGA1151 Motherboard $128.99 @ SuperBiiz
Memory Crucial 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR4-2133 Memory $88.99 @ Adorama
Storage PNY CS1211 480GB 2.5" Solid State Drive $134.49 @ Amazon
Storage Seagate Barracuda 2TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $67.89 @ OutletPC
Video Card Sapphire Radeon R9 Fury 4GB Tri-X Video Card $564.98 @ Newegg
Case Phanteks Enthoo EVOLV ITX Mini ITX Tower Case $62.98 @ Newegg
Power Supply EVGA SuperNOVA GS 550W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply $69.99 @ NCIX US
Operating System Microsoft Windows 10 Home OEM (64-bit) $94.89 @ OutletPC
Monitor Asus MG279Q 144Hz 27.0" Monitor $569.00 @ Amazon
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total (before mail-in rebates) $2196.70
Mail-in rebates -$30.00
Total $2166.70
Generated by PCPartPicker 2015-09-30 03:27 EDT-0400
  • 56 months ago
  • 1 point

"one thing I feel I need to point out is that the..."

....CS1211 is back up to $159

;)

neener


Nice build.

  • 56 months ago
  • 1 point

CS1211 is back up to $159

NEWEGG STAHP!

  • 56 months ago
  • 0 points

First off, I'd like to thank you for your service. We all appreciate more than we could ever show.

Well, this will definitely handle anything. The 980ti is the top of the line. The processor is the gaming standard, though there is the newer Skylake platform. I went with the 4690k because it offers superb gaming performance at a more reasonable cost than the brand new Skylake line, plus the ITX boards are significantly less expensive and there are far more options. Otherwise, it's pretty standard choices all around. A great cpu cooler, good ram, a nifty little handled case, and a very reliable fully modular PSU

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU Intel Core i5-4690K 3.5GHz Quad-Core OEM/Tray Processor $225.99 @ SuperBiiz
CPU Cooler Cooler Master Nepton 240M 76.0 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler $102.99 @ NCIX US
Motherboard Gigabyte GA-Z97N-WIFI Mini ITX LGA1150 Motherboard $113.99 @ SuperBiiz
Memory Mushkin Silverline 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory $34.99 @ Newegg
Storage Crucial BX100 250GB 2.5" Solid State Drive $83.99 @ SuperBiiz
Storage Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $49.89 @ OutletPC
Video Card Gigabyte GeForce GTX 980 Ti 6GB WINDFORCE 3X Video Card $659.99 @ Amazon
Case BitFenix Prodigy (Black) Mini ITX Tower Case $77.99 @ SuperBiiz
Power Supply EVGA SuperNOVA GS 550W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply $69.99 @ Newegg
Operating System Microsoft Windows 10 Home OEM (64-bit) $94.89 @ OutletPC
Monitor Asus VG248QE 144Hz 24.0" Monitor $244.51 @ Amazon
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $1759.21
Generated by PCPartPicker 2015-09-29 01:19 EDT-0400
  • 56 months ago
  • 1 point

Thank you very much!

  • 56 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks for your service.... welcome home!

[comment deleted by staff]

Sort

add arrow-down arrow-left arrow-right arrow-up authorcheckmark clipboard combo comment delete discord dots drag-handle dropdown-arrow errorfacebook history inbox instagram issuelink lock markup-bbcode markup-html markup-pcpp markup-cyclingbuilder markup-plain-text markup-reddit menu pin radio-button save search settings share star-empty star-full star-half switch successtag twitch twitter user warningwattage weight youtube