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Opinions Wanted

DarthNada517

48 months ago

The idea: I want to build an htpc gaming system using these components ( http://pcpartpicker.com/p/CjK94 ). Not getting it all now. I wan't to space it out. Dimension requirements for entertainment center: 8x18x18. It must fit inside for the time being.

The issue: I am concerned that the case I have chosen, Silverstone GD09B, will not allow me to cool my CPU or GPU properly. When I say properly I want the CPU to never reach 70c or my GPU to reach 80c under load. I do plan to OC the 6600k to 4.0 eventually after I learn more about how to overclock safely.

The question: With this in mind, are there other htpc cases that will fit my 7x18x18 dimension requirement, and allow for better cooling? Should I look into getting a mid-tower and just sit it on its side? Or am I over exaggerating the possibility of cooling issues with this case?

Price point: No more than 150 for the case.

Features: I would like to have dust filters, but I can add them if need be.

Comments

  • 48 months ago
  • 1 point

I haven't played around with Skylake too much yet, and not at all in small form factor cases... but for such a compact case I think expecting max 70C for the CPU is asking a bit much of it.

  • 48 months ago
  • 1 point

That's what I'm worried about, and that is why I'm kind of leaning towards getting a Cooler Master Haf 912 so I can cool it better. Thanks for the honesty.

  • 48 months ago
  • 1 point

May I ask why you're after 70C max temp? The CPUs are designed to operate safely up to around 90C. As long as they max out at ≤90C during stress test you don't need to worry about the system overheating during normal workloads.

Honestly unless you get a pretty solid aftermarket cooler you can even expect the higher end i5/i7s to reach around 70C in a standard tower case.

  • 48 months ago
  • 1 point

Honestly it's because of how many online articles I read about CPU longevity. I thought that was the magic number to ensure your parts, especially your CPU, would last for a long time. I knew the GPU would see temps in the 80C range, but all the articles kept suggesting high 60'sC as the target for any build for a CPU. I knew I had to be missing something because Skylake can handle up to 90C, like you said, and work fine for a long time. Can you give me advice on what to see then, in a realistic range, so when I build this thing I know what to expect for a solid operating temp for both CPU and GPU. Just generals from what you've encountered would help me tremendously in getting a relative idea.

  • 48 months ago
  • 1 point

The CPU will automatically shut off when it's at a temperature high enough to damage it. The thing that really kills the CPU is having very high voltage. Unless you overvolt the hell out of the CPU, it should easily outlast any other component in your system even if it's running at fairly high temperatures.

I've only done one Skylake build and it was using an i3 so I can't really tell you what to expect. Most of the i5s I've worked with (Ivy and Haswell) at stock clocks would have load temps of about 70-80C with the stock heatsink. Although with tower coolers (even relatively inexpensive ones like Hyper 212 EVO) this easily drops down to around 55C

  • 48 months ago
  • 1 point

That makes me feel a lot better then, knowing that the aftermarket Noctua cooler will be of considerable help as the benchmarks I've seen imply. Thanks for all the help and advice. I really appreciate it.

  • 48 months ago
  • 1 point

The link you put on here gave me 404.

  • 48 months ago
  • 1 point

http://pcpartpicker.com/p/PnWk23

Should work now. I changed up a few things though.

  • 48 months ago
  • 1 point

Why do you need to 'sit the mid-tower on its side?' Imho, the Silverstone HTPC desktop is for htpc purposes (not really for gaming) or because you want a small ATX case and there are not many choices if you want something compact and small.

EDIT: Oh, you want to fit it in the entertainment center. Okay, but, if you go with a mid-tower, I think you will have to forego that idea? I think the GD09 is as good as the HTPC cases you will find and the price is okay.

With that said, I have seen builds (here?) with Skylake i7 processors and Haswell i7s that can be OC'd. I think the disadvantage of the case if you plan on OC'ing is the height for the cooler. I forget what it is but it's obviously a lot less than the mid-towers.

What you can do is add fans wherever they can go and get a good cooler that will fit. Otherwise, if you plan on a significant OC, consider a mid-tower and put it in a spot in which it can stand upright. Just some suggestions. Also, try finding owners of this case and see if anyone tried overclocking in/w it.

  • 48 months ago
  • 1 point

I looked into it, and the idea simply wont work. The way the bays are in the GD09B wont allow me to get airflow to my gtx 970. On top of that, the U9S wont exactly be able to displace enough heat when under load, and I can't fit the second fan from what I have heard from other builds. I think the Fractal Arc Mini R2 is going to be the final winner. Thanks for the advice and input. Always appreciate the feedback.

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