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4K editing, color grading, compositing & vfx workstation

lordpatraxx
  • 53 months ago

Hi Guys :)

I'm looking to build a 4k workstation that would allow me to do real-time editing and grading with Red Raw 4k footages. As for the compositing and vfx, I'm well aware that real-time lecture depends on the numbers of layers and effects you use. But the priority is the real-time editing. From what I read - and I read a lot! - I'd need at least 32gb ram and high access/speed disks, meaning SSD (probably a 4 disks raid volume 4x1TB). The tricky thing for me is the choice of the processor. I'd say the 5930k is a good choice because of the 6 cores, but I don't know which is the most important thing between raw power vs the number of cores when it comes to video editing and treatment. Would the i7 6700k be a valuable option? And, just for my knowledge, are the AMD processors really not fit for these kind of tasks? I'd like to add that this workstation will be running on linux (probably ubuntu studio or suse). My budget would ideally be arround 1500 £, but feel free to raise it if you're feeling that my budget doesn't meet my needs.

Thank you very much for your help!

Patrick

Comments

  • 53 months ago
  • 2 points

I'd need at least 32gb ram and high access/speed disks, meaning SSD (probably a 4 disks raid volume 4x1TB).

Unfortunately, your description of the footage you're working with is too vague to determine what sort of bandwidth requirements you're going to have for smooth playback and editing in real-time.

"red raw," as you most likely are well aware, is a proprietary compressed raw format.

http://www.red.com/tools/recording-time

At what frame-rate and compression ratio? What camera/recorder are you working with here? 4K could mean anything from ~20MB/s to ~200MB/s depending on your recorder and settings.

More than likely, you won't need to use RAID to support your bandwidth requirements at all. In fact, most modern large (~500GB or larger) SSD's can handle that sort of bandwidth range easily with headroom to spare.


The tricky thing for me is the choice of the processor. I'd say the 5930k is a good choice because of the 6 cores, but I don't know which is the most important thing between raw power vs the number of cores when it comes to video editing and treatment.

I'd say if you're in the market for an i7, the 5820K is your best value option.

Video editing in most mainstream video editing applications scales well to many-cores, up to a point. There are a lot of situations in video editing and rendering and trans-coding that can make use of parallel workflows, so a general rule of thumb here is more cores is better, assuming they add up to more execution throughput. (more cores clocked at a significantly lower speed, or more weaker cores, such that there is no increase in throughput would not be helpful). Core count in and of itself doesn't tell the whole story.

Would the i7 6700k be a valuable option? And, just for my knowledge, are the AMD processors really not fit for these kind of tasks?

The 6700K offers about 85% of the performance of a 5820K in this sort of application. The FX-8370 offers about 70% of the performance of a 5820K for this application. The AMD option is a reasonable value but probably not what you are looking for at this budget. Also, Skylake is not well supported by Linux at this time (requires bleeding edge kernel, etc). The more mature X99/C612 chipset platform is probably the way to go here.

I'd like to add that this workstation will be running on linux (probably ubuntu studio or suse).

I'd love to hear more about what software you intend to use in linux to edit video.

The history of video editing in linux is basically garbage. Nothing but unfinished, buggy software that performs poorly and lacks the features and stability and interface required to get anything done. Find a video editor in linux that works today, and it will be broken by an update next month, fixed again in 3 months, busted again a week later. GPGPU acceleration in linux is also a moving target of unfinished business.

I can see one benefit to linux for this... 30 bit color space is supported by GeForce (cheap) on linux. On windows, this requires quadro or firepro for support. Not sure if AMD is supporting 30 bit color space on radeon for linux (I see the option in the driver, but i have no way to confirm it is working). I'm not sure this is worth it, unless you can find a video editor for linux worth bothering with.

  • 53 months ago
  • 1 point

Thank you very much for your input. To answer your first question, it'd be for red dragon footages shot at 25fps most of the time. Since the camera shot in 6K, well we shoot in 6K because the bigger the better! I've been dealing with Red workflow for a while (since the beginning actually), and before, editing Red meant transcoding before editing. And that's a pain in the ***, especially when you must quickly deliver. I'm handling post-production with a mid-2011 27" iMac i7 3.4 GHz since I created my company in 2011. It works really well, but I feel the age of the machine now :) So I wanted to buy another station that could handle the job better than my 'old' iMac. And since I'm fed up with Mac (mac user for 18 years now), and that post-production and windows are two antagonistic notions for me, I'm willing to turn toward linux. My current laptop is running ubuntu mate, and I'm really satisfied with it.

The history of video editing in linux is basically garbage. Nothing but unfinished, buggy software that performs poorly and lacks the features and stability and interface required to get anything done. Find a video editor in linux that works today, and it will be broken by an update next month, fixed again in 3 months, busted again a week later. GPGPU acceleration in linux is also a moving target of unfinished business.

Yeah, you're not wrong but consider that world class software such as Flame, Maya, Smoke used to run on linux only before. Ideally I'd like to edit on DaVinci Resolve 12, but only CentOS is supported, and I'm not a huge fan of it. So I think I'll edit on Lightworks and finish with MambaFx (their website is down, dunno why, check this: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K3ZK8tmOpMY) both running on Suse. I'm currently testing this option. And there are other professional software on linux when it comes to post-production: ardour, blender (free), nuke, natron (free), piranha 8 (not tested),... Maybe those tools aren't fit for any project but I believe there's a specific solution for each project.

I'd just like to exit the osx/adobe path, but maybe I'm just fooling myself and I'd better build an Hackintosh. It'd be cheaper, and always better than my iMac.

Anyway, thanks for your help and I'd like to hear your point of view on the way I see post-production through linux.

  • 53 months ago
  • 2 points

Since the camera shot in 6K, well we shoot in 6K because the bigger the better!

Context wise, I was under the impression, based on the budget for the new editing rig, that you had probably recently acquired one of the original red one camera's in "gently used" condition for a couple thousand bucks. Which is a context that fits nicely with trying to use linux and a budget editing rig to get this done.

If you're shooting in 6K, then that context is sort of out the window. $2000 editing rig for $30,000-100,000 worth of camera and accessories just doesn't add up. I'm sure there's a valid explanation for this but things just got very confusing for me very fast...

Don't get me wrong. I love linux, it's all I use for daily computing. I think I enjoy the novelty of it, the uniqueness of it. The linux ecosystem is a more interesting, tangled web of software and hacks that amazingly sort of works, but I assure you, if you're coming from any sort of modernized workflow on a Mac, expect a move towards linux to be like stepping back in time 10-20 years in many ways. (that might not be a bad thing in some regards, as the vast majority of advancements made in user interface and application design have been for the sake of change rather than for the sake of any actual improvement but I digress)....

The obvious answer is a red rocket card, FCPX on a PowerMac or Premier on Windows. 8+ core Ivy bridge or newer workstation (mac pro or custom PC). Edit redcode native right in the application without the need for complicated drive setups, with the CPU/GPU resources of the machine free to work on manipulations of the footage rather than simply decoding it.


For the sake of being thorough, I just gave lightworks another try, as I've long thought it had promise, but could never get past the login screen on it in all my prior attempts. The registration process was bugged for a long time, and the application always just crashed on a failed login attempt.

I just found a workaround and got lightworks running on my preferred distro (manjaro). Imported some personal clips and started editing. Seemed pretty good, so I downloaded some 4K 25FPS .r3d files from the interwebs to see if they have that working as claimed. I was able to import the clips, and do some smooth real-time playback with ~40-50% CPU utilization (FX-8350@4.4ghz). I tossed the clips I had downloaded into the timeline to begin applying color adjustments and try a bit of cutting/transitioning. Didn't get that far. Crashed while trying to playback the timeline.

Tried again, Crash

Then again and it worked for quite awhile (hasn't crashed "again" yet). Scrubbing performance is nice. Playback performance seems too good to be true (almost certainly not full-frame decoding).

Maybe with a different distro this would work better but if my past experience is any indication it won't make any difference. Unfortunately, based on the instability I have to throw this in the trash heap with all the other linux NLE's. It's just another half baked linux NLE, but perhaps one of the best half baked NLE's out there.

On the up-side, It does appear that lightworks offers pretty smooth real-time preview of applied changes, and appears to be leveraging GPU compute resources for some of the manipulations and effects, allowing for instant preview with no render time, similar to the murcury engine in Adobe Pr/AE.

Unfortunately, lightworks doesn't appear to have any sophisticated preferences or settings or information dialogs that would allow me to see how it is handling the playback of these files. I have no idea if it is decoding the entirety of the video or some fraction of it, and wouldn't be able to make heads or tails of it either way as I don't have enough monitor resolution to resolve if it were decoding at a high resolution.

On initial inspection of the software capabilities, this is more along the lines of a cumbersome and awkward iMovie than a FCP level application. Yea there's a few more dials and switches but my memory of FCP from 14 years ago recalls it being a far more sophisticated and capable piece of software even way back then.


I've tinkered with blender for video editing. That's a can of worms and an uphill battle IMO. Talk about editing video by way of Alaska. I just can't rationalize the learning curve for what should be a far more intuitive operation. Highly doubt it has native .r3d support.


I've heard of some of these other tools in the past but never had a chance to test them... Looks like Nuke now has a non-commercial (educational) type version available for download (not available last I checked into this).

Just downloaded and installed and ran it. Very nice looking software but so far as I can tell they do not have the kinks worked out for playback of .r3d video files. Yes, it reads them, but hardware utilization is poor (never exceeding ~35% CPU or GPU utilization regardless of settings), and only achieving real-time playback at lower quality partial frame decoding, and even then just barely; requiring "buffering" and/or "preview rendering" to really get anywhere here. At full frame decoding the performance is ~4-5FPS by my estimate.

There is the option to select red-rocket acceleration. (at which point, your $2000 editing computer jumps to $6500+).

This application does appear to have a built-in frame-work for proxy-editing, which might be a worthwhile alternative. (at least that would save you the step of transcoding your footage separately, and maintain a loss-less workflow by using the original raw footage as the source for export rendering).

Sad thing is, I think if the software were better optimized it could probably play-back the 4K .R3D files on my machine.


I would not advise a TOS violation hackintosh that could be "busted" at any moment by software changes for any build, especially one you rely on for work.


Idunno man. I think using linux for this is going to be an interesting endeavor. More power to ya if you can develop a functioning workflow with raw red and linux under the same roof.


If you want to give the budget approach a whirl, Something like this might be worth a shot.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU Intel Core i7-5820K 3.3GHz 6-Core Processor £315.59 @ Overclockers.co.uk
CPU Cooler Thermalright Macho Rev.B 73.6 CFM CPU Cooler £40.72 @ Amazon UK
Motherboard MSI X99A Raider ATX LGA2011-3 Motherboard £172.76 @ More Computers
Memory Kingston HyperX Fury Black 32GB (4 x 8GB) DDR4-2400 Memory £149.99 @ Amazon UK
Storage Samsung 850 EVO-Series 250GB 2.5" Solid State Drive £55.99 @ Amazon UK
Storage Seagate Constellation ES.3 4TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive £161.86 @ Amazon UK
Storage Seagate Constellation ES.3 4TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive £161.86 @ Amazon UK
Video Card Gigabyte GeForce GTX 960 4GB Video Card £155.99 @ Amazon UK
Case Nanoxia NXDS1W ATX Mid Tower Case £95.30 @ Kustom PCs
Power Supply EVGA SuperNOVA P2 850W 80+ Platinum Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply £109.99 @ Amazon UK
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total £1420.05
Generated by PCPartPicker 2015-12-29 00:17 GMT+0000

I wouldn't spend more on the GPU until you've either found evidence or tested software to determine useful GPGPU performance scaling in linux. It looks like there is a version of REDCINE-X for linux called REDLINE Linux (beta). If that utilizes GPGPU compute as well as the Windows/Mac versions then it might be a useful tool for transcoding to a more friendly editing format (assuming you wanted to stick with an old-school workflow like that). Based on what I saw in lightworks and Nuke today I don't think I would spent too much on the GPU if those are your first choices. I attempted to run redline to no avail. The included instructions do not work. Syntax issues with the arguments. (like most CL sofware in linux, lol). If you have better luck then perhaps you might look into adding a GTX980 or better to the build to use as a dedicated compute card (continue using the 960 as your display adapter card).

For linux there's no reason to buy a Quadro card, the's only 1 proprietary linux driver for these GPU's and it supports the same functionality and features regardless of whether its a quadro or geforce card.


If you wanted to spend a little more, an E5-1650 V3 or 1660 V3 on an ASRock Extreme 4 or Gigabyte MW50-SV0 or Supermicro X10SRA with ECC Registered memory would be a nice option.

If you'd like to see an example of a multi-socket E5-2600 Xeon Build let me know. The SuperMicro X10DAL is an inexpensive dual socket board to build on. The problem with this sort of approach for a linux machine is that while the hardware is well supported in linux, whether you will appreciate any performance scaling from such a build is more of an unknown on linux as there is just a lot less information available out there.

  • 53 months ago
  • 1 point

Context wise, I was under the impression, based on the budget for the new editing rig, that you had probably recently acquired one of the original red one camera's in "gently used" condition for a couple thousand bucks. Which is a context that fits nicely with trying to use linux and a budget editing rig to get this done. If you're shooting in 6K, then that context is sort of out the window. $2000 editing rig for $30,000-100,000 worth of camera and accessories just doesn't add up. I'm sure there's a valid explanation for this but things just got very confusing for me very fast...

No actually, I didn't see the point of investing into a camera. All project are different, so I choose the camera according to the nature of the project and its final diffusion (TV vs web) I produce commercial film so I always have the budget to rent whatever camera I want. What I need to buy though is a good workstation since It's where I make most of my mark-up.

I've tinkered with blender for video editing. That's a can of worms and an uphill battle IMO. Talk about editing video by way of Alaska. I just can't rationalize the learning curve for what should be a far more intuitive operation. Highly doubt it has native .r3d support.

I was just speaking about professional linux based softwares in general. I consider Blender just as a 3D soft, not a NLE.

I explained earlier why I'd like to do this on Linux, but I think the real reason is the challenge it represents :) and - you're right - the novelty of it. So I won't go for windows anyway, and I agree with you, Hackintosh is not the best solution either. Exchanging with you comforts me in this quest :) I think the good answer would be a dual boot build CentOs, to edit with Resolve Studio which I prefer over Lightworks, which I find not very intuitive; and Suse for finishing under MambaFX which now supports OFX (Sapphire plug-ins among others) which is great. When Fusion will be ready for linux, I might use this software as well.

I wouldn't spend more on the GPU until you've either found evidence or tested software to determine useful GPGPU performance scaling in linux

According to BlackMagicDesign, here are recommended specs. But it is not clear if the GPUs are used on a linux workstation. I think it is, but it's just a guess....

http://documents.blackmagicdesign.com/DaVinciResolve/20150911-5823e9/DaVinci_Resolve_12_Configuration_Guide.pdf See page 51

DAVINCI RESOLVE FOR MAC OS X, WINDOWS AND LINUX - CERTIFIED CONFIGURATION GUIDE Linux Workstations Supermicro SuperServer 7048GR-TR Black 4RU Rackmountable/Tower Dual Intel Xeon E5-2697 v3 (dual 14 core; dual 8 core is minimum recommended) 32GB (8x4GB memory sticks) or more ECC DDR4-2133 SDRAM Use the same size RAM in all eight slots for maximum RAM access speed lntel SSD530 480GB SSD SATA system drive or larger DVD-RW drive, SATA, Black http://www.supermicro.com/products/system/4u/7048/sys-7048gr-tr.cfm Where to Buy http://www.supermicro.com.tw/wheretobuy/index.cfm Alternative with a different feature set HP Z840 Dual Intel Xeon E5-2697 v3 (dual 14 core) (Dual 8 core is minimum recommended) 32GB RAM (8x4GB memory sticks) or higher Use pairs of 4 for maximum memory bandwidth SATA 7200 1TB system hard drive 1 x DVD-RW drive, SATA, Black http://www8.hp.com/us/en/campaigns/workstations/z840.html Where to Buy http://www8.hp.com/us/en/campaigns/workstations/z840.html DAVINCI RESOLVE FOR MAC OS X, WINDOWS AND LINUX - CERTIFIED CONFIGURATION GUIDE GPU selection NVIDIA Options Multiple alternative options are shown in no particular order NVIDIA Quadro M6000 12GB GDDR5 SDRAM http://www.nvidia.com/object/quadro-desktop-gpus.html NVIDIA Quadro K5200 8GB GDDR5 SDRAM http://www.nvidia.com/object/quadro-desktop-gpus.html Recommended for UI GPU Only NVIDIA Quadro K4200 4GB GDDR5 SDRAM http://www.nvidia.com/object/quadro-desktop-gpus.html NVIDIA GeForce GTX TITAN X 12GB GDDR5 SDRAM http://www.geforce.com/hardware/desktop-gpus/geforce-gtx-titan-X 56 DAVINCI RESOLVE FOR MAC OS X, WINDOWS AND LINUX - CERTIFIED CONFIGURATION GUIDE NVIDIA GeForce GTX 980 4GB GDDR5 SDRAM http://www.geforce.com/hardware/desktop-gpus/geforce-gtx-980 http://www.geforce.com/hardware/desktop-gpus/geforce-gtx-titan-x (Select the GPU and then ‘Compare and Buy’) NVIDIA GeForce GTX 780 3GB GDDR5 SDRAM http://www.geforce.com/hardware/desktop-gpus/geforce-gtx-780 Where to Buy http://www.nvidia.com/object/workstation-wtb.html AMD/ATI GPUs AMD Firepro W9100 16GB GDDR5 SDRAM http://www.amd.com/en-us/products/graphics/workstation/firepro-3d/9100 AMD Firepro W9000 6GB GDDR5 SDRAM http://www.amd.com/en-us/products/graphics/workstation/firepro-3d/9000 AMD Firepro W8000 4GB GDDR5 SDRAM http://www.amd.com/en-us/products/graphics/workstation/firepro-3d/8000 AMD Firepro W7000 (UI Only) 4GB GDDR5 SDRAM http://www.amd.com/en-us/products/graphics/workstation/firepro-3d/7000 Where to Buy http://shop.amd.com/en-us

If you'd like to see an example of a multi-socket E5-2600 Xeon Build let me know

Yes please!

Anyway thank you again very much for your advice. It's a huge help for me!

  • 53 months ago
  • 1 point

Yea I've read through the recommended hardware for resolve before. Obviously that $1000 piece of software doesn't really fit within the context of your build budget nor its hardware requirements/recommendations.


If you do want to try to get into a set of hardware that is well suited to resolve in linux, maybe something like this:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU Intel Xeon E5-2680 V3 2.5GHz 12-Core OEM/Tray Processor £1434.41 @ CCL Computers
CPU Cooler Noctua NH-U12DXi4 55.0 CFM CPU Cooler £49.99 @ Amazon UK
Motherboard SUPERMICRO MBD-X10DAi-O £280.00
Memory Crucial 32GB (4 x 8GB) Registered DDR4-2133 Memory £205.92 @ More Computers
Storage Sandisk Extreme Pro 240GB 2.5" Solid State Drive £88.66 @ Amazon UK
Storage Sandisk Extreme Pro 960GB 2.5" Solid State Drive £250.43 @ Amazon UK
Storage Seagate Constellation ES.3 4TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive £161.86 @ Amazon UK
UI Card Asus Turbo GeForce GTX 960 4GB Video Card £172.00
Compute Card Asus GeForce GTX Titan X 12GB Video Card £809.99 @ Amazon UK
Case (redonkulous) Thermaltake Core X9 ATX Desktop Case £115.20 @ Kustom PCs
Power Supply EVGA SuperNOVA 1300 G2 1300W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply £158.50 @ More Computers
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total £3726.96
Generated by PCPartPicker 2015-12-30 06:45 GMT+0000

I searched for the X10DAL on UK resellers sites and came up dry. The DAL is the ideal for a build like this as it is basically ATX form factor (only slightly larger, but fits lots of case options comfortably). The next option in line that is relatively inexpensive is the X10DAi, but this is a full EATX motherboard (12 X 13 inches).

While there are many case's that will fit such a motherboard, most of them don't do it gracefully. Usually involves covering the entire motherboard tray, loosing all cable management. The alternative is a traditional enterprise chassis from SuperMicro or Chenbro or similar. These are typically very "industrial PC from 1997" in the looks department, often have high RPM fans better suited to equipment closets than your desktop, and often have unnecessary internal features that make more sense in an enterprise environment and less sense for a single build. If you don't mind these quirks they are typically good quality case's, but if it were my build I would want it in something more modern/sleek/handsome or futuristic/stylized looking.

The types of case's that fit full EATX boards comfortably (still room on the tray for cable management and LOTS of room for drives) tend to be very large, like the Nanoxia Deep Silence 6, Rosewill Throne, or even the "mighty" Corsair 900D. The less traditional X9 from thermaltake actually looks like a very roomy contender for such a build. (I'm not sure if I'm excited about the looks yet, man it is just huge... though maybe that would make a statement!)

An EATX build can be done in much smaller case's, with some compromises's.... For example, the Nanoxia Deep Silence 2 is a "long" mid-tower that will fit this sort of build. However, it only has 7 expansion slots, which means that the bottom PCIE slot on the board can't be used for a GPU, any configuration with more than 2 GPU's would require an expansion chassis (not necessarily a bad thing). Another contender would be the dirt cheap Rosewill Rise Glow, which has the 8 expansion slots required to install up to 3 GPU's, but is going to be more limited on room to install drives and may require lower profile CPU cooling options, (external SAS or Fiber connected storage solutions may be in your future). Then again, an 8 X 2.5" to 1 X 5.25" bay adapter (see icy dock) could solve that problem if you foresee the use of a large number of 1TB 2.5" SSD's....

Obviously, the build above could be scaled up or down in many areas. I went with Nvidia GeForce for this, as there is ample evidence to suggest that there is 10 bit color support in linux with GeForce drivers. I haven't been able to confirm anything for Radeon on linux about this. A separate UI and compute GPU have been selected to help minimize contention for GPU resources, which should keep the program much more responsive.


Here's a much more scaled down build in a smaller case:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU Intel Xeon E5-2630 V3 2.4GHz 8-Core Processor £549.36 @ Dabs
CPU Cooler Scythe SCKTN-4000 55.5 CFM CPU Cooler £25.45 @ Amazon UK
Motherboard SUPERMICRO MBD-X10DAI-O £280.00
Memory Crucial 32GB (4 x 8GB) Registered DDR4-2133 Memory £205.92 @ More Computers
Storage Sandisk Extreme Pro 240GB 2.5" Solid State Drive £88.66 @ Amazon UK
Storage Seagate Constellation ES.3 4TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive £161.86 @ Amazon UK
Storage Seagate Constellation ES.3 4TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive £161.86 @ Amazon UK
UI Video Card EVGA GeForce GTX 950 2GB £120.00
Compute Card EVGA GeForce GTX 980 Ti 6GB Superclocked Video Card £529.98 @ Amazon UK
Case Rosewill RISE Glow ATX Full Tower Case £79.99 @ Amazon UK
Power Supply EVGA 850W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply £110.14 @ Amazon UK
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total £2313.22
Generated by PCPartPicker 2015-12-30 17:19 GMT+0000

Obviously, both builds are presented as starting off with a single CPU and compute GPU, with room to add another of each.


Another approach that tickles me is the possibility of using a Decklink Studio 4K output card connected to a dedicated calibrated monitor for color grading etc, then use high value AMD GPU's for your UI and compute. R9 390's cost less than half of a 980Ti, have more VRAM, and should be capable of achieving ~80% of render throughput of the 980Ti.

  • 53 months ago
  • 1 point

Hey :) First I wish you a very happy new year :D

Sorry I was away for a couple of days. Thank you very much for your time and precious help. I think the last configuration you build is the one I needed! Thanks a lot man!

  • 53 months ago
  • 0 points

Hey there,

Wanted to let you know I haven't forgot about this thread and your build. I have some build ideas and have been working on a response for consideration that more thoroughly covers build concepts for a Davinci Resolve centric box. I'll try to get that finished up and posted sometime tomorrow if possible.

  • 53 months ago
  • 1 point

Hi Patrick..

1500 GBpounds would infact be inadequate.. me reckons..

Without going into multi-faceted details,

http://www.intel.com/content/dam/www/public/us/en/documents/guides/workstation-adobe-4k-guide.pdf

A proper workstation would need a Xeon or Haswell-E cpu as Xeons do offer massive performance scaling over enthusiast i5's & i7's.. They also lend themselves more to parallel architecture involving multi-core & multi-threaded processing..

see this.. http://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/workstations/workstation-configurator-tool.html

The second imp point of a video editor would be a 30-bit GPU which can display 210 colors, like the NVIDIA Quadro or the AMD Firepro, that have native support for 30 bit output.

What is a 30 Bit Photography Workflow?

Allan_M_Systems has put together a very good rendering / editing PC here.. http://pcpartpicker.com/forums/topic/128201-cad-rendering-workstation-build

If $4-5K sounds too prohibitive, I think this $2k baby might be a good starter, but it won't be a proper workstation.. Something to call a workstation at a price-point of $2K..

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU Intel Xeon E5-1650 V3 3.5GHz 6-Core Processor $569.99 @ SuperBiiz
CPU Cooler Silverstone NT06-PRO 74.0 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler $54.99 @ SuperBiiz
Motherboard Supermicro X10SRL-F-O LGA2011 ATX Server Motherboard $260.00 @ SuperBiiz
Memory Crucial 32GB (4 x 8GB) Registered DDR4-2133 Memory $259.71 @ Amazon
Storage Samsung 950 PRO 256GB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive $189.99 @ Amazon
Storage Seagate Constellation ES.3 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $84.99 @ Directron
Storage Seagate Constellation ES.3 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $84.99 @ Directron
Storage Seagate Constellation ES.3 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $84.99 @ Directron
Storage Seagate Constellation ES.3 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $84.99 @ Directron
Video Card HP FirePro W5100 4GB Video Card $317.57 @ B&H
Case Nanoxia Deep Silence 2 ATX Mid Tower Case $99.99 @ Amazon
Power Supply EVGA 750W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply $43.99 @ NCIX US
Other Addonics ADM2PX4 M2 Pcie Ssd Pcie 3.0 4-lane Accs Adapter
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total (before mail-in rebates) $2205.12
Mail-in rebates -$35.00
Total $2170.12
Generated by PCPartPicker 2015-12-28 05:50 EST-0500
I think u need atleast this, You can add another CPU later-on:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU Intel Xeon E5-2630 V3 2.4GHz 8-Core Processor $628.99 @ SuperBiiz
CPU Cooler Silverstone NT06-PRO 74.0 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler $54.99 @ SuperBiiz
Motherboard Supermicro X10DAX-O Dual LGA2011 Server Motherboard $407.99 @ SuperBiiz
Memory Crucial 32GB (4 x 8GB) Registered DDR4-2133 Memory $259.71 @ Amazon
Storage Samsung 950 PRO 256GB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive $189.99 @ Amazon
Storage Seagate Constellation ES.3 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $84.99 @ Directron
Storage Seagate Constellation ES.3 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $84.99 @ Directron
Storage Seagate Constellation ES.3 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $84.99 @ Directron
Storage Seagate Constellation ES.3 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $84.99 @ Directron
Video Card HP FirePro W5100 4GB Video Card $317.57 @ B&H
Case Nanoxia Deep Silence 2 ATX Mid Tower Case $99.99 @ Amazon
Power Supply EVGA 1000W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply $92.99 @ NCIX US
M2 PCIE ADAPTER Addonics ADM2PX4 M2 Pcie Ssd Pcie 3.0 4-lane Accs Adapter $33.93 @ Amazon
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total (before mail-in rebates) $2471.11
Mail-in rebates -$45.00
Total $2426.11
Generated by PCPartPicker 2015-12-28 06:25 EST-0500
  • 53 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks a lot for your answer. I suspected my budget would be a little bit short for that! Yes indeed, 4k is too much of an investment for the moment, but the 2nd configuration you propose could be affordable for me. Anyway, the provided documentation is very helpful, thanks a lot!

  • 53 months ago
  • 1 point

Absolutely dude.. best wishes, :DD

  • 53 months ago
  • 1 point

Allan_M_Systems is by far the most knowledgeable & level-headed dude around these parts.. His suggestions are on par with a paid consultant, I think u will benefit greatly by his advice..

Do get back 2 him..

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