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$1100 budget - Adobe products, office

Aut4600
  • 53 months ago

Hello,

I need some help building a system for Photoshop (photography), Illustrator, Lightroom and microsoft office use. NO GAMING. I would like to spend as less as possible but I can stretch my budget up to $1100. My plan was to go with a skylake build (Something like a i7 + GTX 970 is already $800..). I want to keep this system for a few years. Working in PS/LR does not work efficiently in my current system. My curent system is actually out of service right now, that's why I would like to build a new one asap!

I want to reuse the following parts: Samsung DSpinpoint F3 1 TB SATA 3.0 Gb-s 32 MB Cache HD103SJ + 640GB Western Digital HDD Crucial M4 2.5" 128GB SATA III MLC SSD Corsair Carbide Series Black 400R Mid Tower Computer Case Brand new Samsung EVO 850 - 500GB SSD

I have a 24'' monitor, keyboard, mouse. Win 7. I could reuse my old PSU. Antec 620 but I would rather get a new one.

Location: California

Thanks in advance!

Comments

  • 53 months ago
  • 1 point

Just so you know Photoshop, I can't speak for light room, won't need 970 level of performance, more like 950 or 960 levels.

Unless of course your doing like hardcore 10+ Mega Pixel stuff which I have never done.

  • 53 months ago
  • 1 point

Hi CharlieLidbury,

I do work on pretty big tiff/dng files and photoshop was just lagging most of the time.

  • 53 months ago
  • 2 points

Oh, what was your old graphics card and CPU?

  • 53 months ago
  • 1 point

I5-2400 with a MSI 560 GTX-Ti Twin Frozr II (1GB)

  • 53 months ago
  • 2 points

Oh wow! Both are fairly underpowered! A 950/960 would see huge performance gains, unless you really want a 970.

  • 53 months ago
  • 2 points

Anything beyond a GTX750 will do nothing for photoshop. The only useful upgrade path beyond this point would be a workstation GPU to gain 10 bit per channel color support.

(exception to this would be for connectivity needs. IE, if you want to run a few 4K displays, it's easier to find the required connectivity for this in GTX950 and better GPU's).

  • 53 months ago
  • 1 point

haha yeah! Its time to upgrade!

Is there a big performance gain between the 960 and 970?? Its about a $100 difference. I rather save some $$ but photoshop (and lightroom?) takes advantage of the GPU processor.

  • 53 months ago
  • 2 points

An i5-2400 + GTX560 should have no problems running photoshop smoothly with enormous files as long as it has enough RAM.

There is very little performance scaling beyond a GTX650 in photoshop. (FYI, your GTX560 is more powerful than this).

  • 53 months ago
  • 1 point

How much RAM did that machine have?

  • 53 months ago
  • 1 point

Hi Allan! Thanks for all the info!

I had 12GB DDR3 in the old system. 2x8GB G.Skill and 2x4GB G.Skill.

I did upgrade the ram to 24GB but from that point on I was plagued with bluescreens, instant reboots and other issues.

That's why I decided to do a "fresh" start with a new build

  • 53 months ago
  • 2 points

Well, I'm not sure how large the files are you're working with, or how many you have open at any one time, but photoshop is a major RAM hog. Assuming your OS and other applications eat 2GB of memory, leaving 10GB to work with, that would be "eaten" by a file size (or combined file sizes) of only a few hundred megabytes.

My advise, for any dedicated image editing rig that commonly works on ultra-large canvas sizes with lots of layers, is to use a Xeon E5 V3 processor with ECC Registered memory. This will support 256GB or more memory depending on the motherboard and other factors. Obviously you don't have to install this much, but the nice thing about this approach is that even with 64-128GB of memory installed (a great idea for serious image editing), the incidence of memory failure/error will still be lower than on a traditional desktop with 8-16GB of non-CC memory.

By contrast, if you build a machine with an i7, and max it out with 64GB or 128GB (depending on platform) of non-ECC memory, you'll have created a workstation with a higher chance of memory related failure/error than traditional desktops. This seems counterproductive to me.

I'll get back to you with some build ideas.... I think you might be well served to re-use your GPU and PSU for now so that you can afford to get a nice workstation motherboard loaded with lots of RAM, and a powerful 4-6 core E5 Xeon. (6 core if you want to do video editing also).

  • 53 months ago
  • 1 point

I should add that in the future I might get into some video editing too!

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