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codeman69
  • 53 months ago

Could someone build me a PC that could run Fallout 4 on ultra at least 30 FPS with a monitor included for under $500. Use a SSHD and i dont need a disc drive. Please and thank you.

Comments

  • 53 months ago
  • 2 points

Used Monitor:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU Intel Core i3-6100 3.7GHz Dual-Core Processor $124.99 @ SuperBiiz
Motherboard ASRock H110M-HDV Micro ATX LGA1151 Motherboard $51.99 @ Amazon
Memory G.Skill NT Series 8GB (1 x 8GB) DDR4-2400 Memory $34.99 @ Newegg
Storage Seagate 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Hybrid Internal Hard Drive $69.99 @ Amazon
Video Card Zotac GeForce GTX 750 Ti 2GB Video Card $104.99 @ Newegg
Case Fractal Design Core 1000 USB 3.0 MicroATX Mid Tower Case $29.99 @ Newegg
Power Supply EVGA 600B 600W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply $44.99 @ Newegg
Monitor Used 19-20" 900P - 1050P LCD $40.00
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $501.93
Generated by PCPartPicker 2016-01-25 04:40 EST-0500

New Monitor:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU AMD Athlon X4 860K 3.7GHz Quad-Core Processor $69.99 @ Amazon
Motherboard MSI A68HM-GRENADE Micro ATX FM2+ Motherboard $58.98 @ Newegg
Memory Crucial Ballistix Sport XT 8GB (1 x 8GB) DDR3-1866 Memory $37.97 @ Amazon
Storage Seagate 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Hybrid Internal Hard Drive $69.99 @ Amazon
Video Card Zotac GeForce GTX 750 Ti 2GB Video Card $104.99 @ Newegg
Case Fractal Design Core 1000 USB 3.0 MicroATX Mid Tower Case $29.99 @ Newegg
Power Supply EVGA 600B 600W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply $44.99 @ Newegg
Monitor BenQ GW2255 60Hz 21.5" Monitor $99.99 @ Amazon
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $516.89
Generated by PCPartPicker 2016-01-25 04:51 EST-0500
  • 53 months ago
  • 1 point

Would it perform though?

  • 53 months ago
  • 1 point

It will run fallout 4 at 30+FPS ultra 1080P. (just turn down the "god rays" to high).

  • 53 months ago
  • -1 points

750 ti is a horrible card. It's Underpowered for its price and really the only benefit it has is that its TDP is very low.

The R7 370 is virtually the same price and is 50% better performing.

  • 53 months ago
  • 2 points

The R7 370 is virtually the same price

In a virtual artificial world, yes, they are the same price.

In reality, the lowest landed price for an R7 370 right now (at the time the build was posted last night, and at the time of this posting) is $135. In a world with a GTX950 priced at $143 landed, a $135 overclocked HD7850 is a total ripoff. Another $8 over the price of the R7 370 buys superior efficiency, better multi monitor support, higher render throughput, support for more API's, better DX12 feature level support, a far superior fixed function video engine (4K encode/decoding H.265/VP9/H.264), HDMI 2.0 output, and better DirectX 9-11 driver/API level performance/compute-overhead optimizations.

In other-words, an R7 370 is an old overclocked, double-rebranded GPU that is a really awful choice of GPU at current pricing.

and is 50% better performing.

50% better render throughput.

Yes.

50% better performance.

No.

The only time render throughput = performance is in a GPU bench-marking bubble. Nobody games the way they benchmark, so the render throughput differences are largely irrelevant to performance. They will manifest as the option to run higher visual quality in actual practice. The hard bound performance limits of such a build will be enforced by CPU execution throughput, API/driver optimization/efficiency, and monitor refresh rate whether the GTX750Ti or R7 370 is chosen.

In fact, when paired with the 860K, a CPU with good thread level parallelism and execution throughput, but poor instruction level parallelism, the weaker Nvidia GPU, which benefits from driver/API optimizations in DX9-11 that balance compute overhead across more threads (command list support), will actually be capable of delivering better FPS minimums in compute bound conditions than AMD's DX9-11 implementation with a more powerful GPU.

For the 860K, a GTX750Ti is actually a better choice of GPU than the R7 370 as it costs $30 less and will make better use of the arrangement of execution resources in the 860K than the R7 370 would.


http://www.techspot.com/review/1081-dx11-vs-dx12-ashes/page5.html

Look at the difference in performance between the FX-8350 running DX11 with Nvidia in a compute bound condition (47FPS at 1080P), vs the same weak-cored AMD CPU running on AMD's DX11 implementation in a compute bound condition (31 FPS at 1080P).

50% performance advantage in DX11 for nvidia when used on CPU's with weak/narrow core architecture.

http://www.overclock.net/t/1495236/amd-vs-nvidia-cpu-overhead/0_100

http://www.techpowerup.com/forums/threads/amd-high-overhead-drivers-on-dx11.209726/

http://forums.guru3d.com/showthread.php?t=398858

http://www.eurogamer.net/articles/digitalfoundry-2016-graphics-card-upgrade-guide

  • 53 months ago
  • 0 points

Really now... discounting rebates which are something people in the real world who don't live in an artificial virtual world will normally take into account...

except for one oddball Zotac outliner, the cheapest 750 Ti costs in most cases 5 dollars less than the cheapest 750Ti and even then the price difference is $20 not 35 like you're trying to claim.

You're a team green fanboy presenting information biased information.

Here's the real fact.

In most games. In most real world situations the 750ti will normally come out roughly 20% slower in performance. That is 20% less in real world performance based on actual gaming benchmarks.

The 370 is the more powerful card. Simple fact. Deal with it.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lSkKDWY2Lx4

  • 53 months ago
  • 2 points

discounting rebates which are something people in the real world who don't live in an artificial virtual world will normally take into account...

People with self respect have no room for stipulation filled rebate scams in their life.

The only price I will entertain for comparison, is the price that puts a product on our doorstep. The only time I will entertain any price after MIR, is if YOU are offering to fill out the forms, copy the receipts, mail it in, and float the difference while we wait.


except for one oddball Zotac outliner

This is the card that is in the build, and is the lowest landed price for a GTX750Ti at this time. Being priced lower than other GTX750Ti's does not disqualify it for consideration.

even then the price difference is $20 not 35 like you're trying to claim.

I never specifically stated the price difference. But since you bring it up. The difference is $30 between the lowest landed price of an R7 370 and GTX750Ti right now.

You're a team green fanboy presenting information biased information.

Far from it.

Both of my workstations are AM3+ and I know a lot about optimizing performance around AMD architecture CPU's. If you look at my build recommendations on this site, you'll see that at higher budgets with more powerful CPU's I advise AMD GPU's very often. In fact, I almost ALWAYS advise them when powerful CPU's are included, and the build does not require any of the advanced or proprietary capabilities only supported by Nvidia.

Here's the real fact. In most games. In most real world situations the 750ti will normally come out roughly 20% slower in performance. That is 20% less in real world performance based on actual gaming benchmarks.

Here's the real fact:

GPU benchmarks for budget GPU's found on the interwebs are usually performed with CPU's that are not likely to be found in budget builds, at fixed visual quality settings, in 100% or near 100% GPU bound conditions. FPS is used as a yardstick to compare render throughput. The FPS result of these benchmarks can not be assumed to directly translate to the way a GPU will actually run in actual gaming conditions on budget CPU's. Your youtube link is a perfect example of this. i7-4790K and running games at ultra settings on budget GPU's. The results tell us that the R7 370 can render faster. They do not tell us what happens when conditions are more realistic.

Gaming with budget GPU's, takes place with budget CPU's, in multiplayer conditions with higher compute workloads, where there is no requirement to "fix" the visual quality setting to a specific level intended to achieve GPU bottle-necking.

The 370 is the more powerful card. Simple fact. Deal with it.

There is no debate about this. Everyone knows the R7 370 is a more powerful GPU. I already agreed with you that it can achieve up to 50% higher render throughput. Render throughput and performance are not the same thing.

[comment deleted by staff]
  • 53 months ago
  • 2 points

GPU's are not measured in "speed." They are measured in render throughput. Render throughput only buys speed if the conditions are GPU bound. In GPU bound conditions, FPS and visual quality are inversely adjustable, all the way until we hit the CPU/software or monitor refresh limitations.

The hard bound limits in performance come from the CPU and it's relationship with the compute workload presented by the game engine and API/Driver overhead, or the monitor refresh rate. Not from GPU render throughput.

I have not made any claim that the GTX750Ti is more powerful in terms of render throughput than an R7 370.

The GTX750Ti at $105, is a fair price for an entry level GPU with its features, efficiency, and software optimization.

$135, is not a fair price to pay for an overclocked HD7850 in a world with a GTX950 for $143. If we want a 4 year old GPU for this build, we can find that on criagslist for half that price.

Sorry, the overclocked HD7850 isn't competitive at $135+ and doesn't fit within the budget of this build.

[comment deleted by staff]
  • 53 months ago
  • 2 points

If you compare the R7 370 and GTX750Ti, from within a GPU bound bench-marking bubble, a bubble that nobody actually plays games inside of, then yes, the R7 370 produces more frames per second.

As soon as we step out of that bubble, where compute overhead plays a role, and visual quality is adjustable, there is no such thing as a "faster" GPU purely in terms of FPS. Render throughput can potentially manifest as visual quality or frame rate depending on adjustments and conditions.

[comment deleted by staff]
  • 53 months ago
  • 1 point

Honestly, Allan's builds are hard to beat. This would be my recommendation, is still over $500 and it cuts costs in some scary places:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU Intel Pentium G4400 3.3GHz Dual-Core Processor $59.99 @ SuperBiiz
CPU Cooler Cooler Master Hyper TX3 54.8 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler $13.99 @ Newegg
Motherboard ASRock Z170 Pro4S ATX LGA1151 Motherboard $82.98 @ Newegg
Memory G.Skill NT Series 8GB (1 x 8GB) DDR4-2400 Memory $34.99 @ Newegg
Storage A-Data Premier SP550 120GB 2.5" Solid State Drive $38.99 @ NCIX US
Video Card PowerColor Radeon R9 380 2GB PCS+ Video Card $149.99 @ Newegg
Case Azza Cosmas ATX Mid Tower Case $19.99 @ Newegg
Power Supply SeaSonic 600W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply $54.99 @ Newegg
Monitor LG 20M37D-B 60Hz 19.5" Monitor $70.98 @ Newegg
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total (before mail-in rebates) $566.89
Mail-in rebates -$40.00
Total $526.89
Generated by PCPartPicker 2016-01-25 16:29 EST-0500

Or this, if you have no plans to upgrade or are OC- averse:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU Intel Core i3-6100 3.7GHz Dual-Core Processor $124.89 @ OutletPC
Motherboard Gigabyte GA-H110M-A Micro ATX LGA1151 Motherboard $49.99 @ Amazon
Memory G.Skill NT Series 8GB (1 x 8GB) DDR4-2400 Memory $34.99 @ Newegg
Storage A-Data Premier SP550 120GB 2.5" Solid State Drive $38.99 @ NCIX US
Video Card PowerColor Radeon R9 380 2GB PCS+ Video Card $149.99 @ Newegg
Case Azza Cosmas ATX Mid Tower Case $19.99 @ Newegg
Power Supply SeaSonic 600W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply $54.99 @ Newegg
Monitor LG 20M37D-B 60Hz 19.5" Monitor $70.98 @ Newegg
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total (before mail-in rebates) $579.81
Mail-in rebates -$35.00
Total $544.81
Generated by PCPartPicker 2016-01-25 16:36 EST-0500
[comment deleted by staff]
  • 53 months ago
  • 2 points

The landed price of that GPU, is $139.

$5 more puts a GTX950 in either of these builds.

No matter how you slice it, the GTX950 is a superior GPU. Render throughput, compute overhead, API support (CUDA + openCL+ higher DX12 feature level support), efficiency, multi monitor support, hardware video decoder/encoder capabilities.

The only possible explanation, for advising the use of an overclocked HD7850 for $139, instead of a GTX950 for $144, would be a massive quantity of brand favoritism causing temporary blindness.

The irony....

[comment deleted by staff]

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