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voltage ripple on the 12V rail

Desert_Dunes
  • 50 months ago

how much is to much? at what point does the CPU/mobo/anything else plugged in start getting damaged from it? (or get its lifespan shortened)

CPU is an i3 6100 paired with a 380X

Comments

  • 50 months ago
  • 2 points

The ATX specification is for +/-120mV. It's a pretty big value compared to most decent power supplies.

All that being said, it'll only really matter if you're overclocking. At stock speeds, ripple voltage isn't a big concern because the CPU is designed to handle a decently large input of ripple voltages. The same thing is true for the GPU. There is still a pretty reasonable range of overclock where ripple voltage won't be much of an issue either.

Ripple voltage won't necessarily shorten a component's lifespan, it will just change how it behaves in-use at overclocked speeds/voltages.

Here's a reference: http://www.overclock.net/t/719397/on-ripple-and-its-effects-on-overclocking

  • 50 months ago
  • 1 point

ah, now i get it, thanks for the link and info

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