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$800 USD College CAD/ Gaming PC

sb_88
  • 52 months ago

I'm interested in building my first desktop PC. I currently have a 15" Macbook Pro Retina but I feel like I need something more powerful for CAD and some gaming. I will be using this as my dedicated Windows work station.

My parent's are giving me $300 to help me with the build and I am willing to put in 500-600 of my own money for the computer. I was looking at the Intel i5 6500 as it's a pretty new processor and have seen good things about it. I am thinking about putting in a MSI R9 380 4G GPU, as that should be good enough for basic CAD wok and gaming. I need a solid good looking case, preferably under $100 with an optical bay slot. Looking at the NZXT s340, but it lacks an optical drive.

I already have a keyboard, mouse, and monitor. I am interested in getting a better mouse that is good to use for long periods of time and isn't too expensive. I need Windows OS as well. My friend gave me his used EVGA 500B PSU. I did the paperclip test and it still runs and seems to work well.

Would like a black/ white or black/red color scheme for the system.

I appreciate the help.

Thanks! -Steve

Comments

  • 52 months ago
  • 2 points

I know its $100 over your budget but this is what I would recommend for CAD and gaming. That Xeon is basically an i7 but without graphics. Since you have a 390 (really good for literally anything on 1080p) you save some money on the CPU and mobo as you won't be OCing. Black/red theme as you wanted. If you want to save some money here (not recommended), ditch the SSD, and the OS.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU Intel Xeon E3-1231 V3 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor $244.99 @ SuperBiiz
Motherboard ASRock Fatal1ty H97 Killer ATX LGA1150 Motherboard $102.98 @ Newegg
Memory A-Data XPG V1.0 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory $61.99 @ Newegg
Storage A-Data Premier Pro SP600 128GB 2.5" Solid State Drive $44.99 @ Amazon
Storage Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $49.89 @ OutletPC
Video Card PowerColor Radeon R9 390 8GB PCS+ Video Card $283.98 @ Newegg
Case Fractal Design Define R4 w/Window (Titanium Grey) ATX Mid Tower Case $74.99 @ NCIX US
Optical Drive Asus DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS DVD/CD Writer $17.78 @ OutletPC
Operating System Microsoft Windows 8.1 OEM (64-bit) $85.89 @ OutletPC
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total (before mail-in rebates) $997.48
Mail-in rebates -$30.00
Total $967.48
Generated by PCPartPicker 2016-02-02 11:05 EST-0500
  • 52 months ago
  • 2 points

Edit: Add this PSU as you have a 390 - https://pcpartpicker.com/part/evga-power-supply-110b10750vr

  • 52 months ago
  • 2 points

Thanks! I was actually considering getting a Xeon as I've heard they're comparable to some i7s while being a lot cheaper. I might consider using an older optical disk drive from a PC in my house, and I'm not sure if I want to spend that much on a graphics card for basic CAD work. I really appreciate your help, and I like the case. Thanks! I'm trying to not go over $900 at the absolute max.

  • 52 months ago
  • 2 points

The EVGA NEXB PSU is not a PSU I would recommend especially for a build of this magnitude in terms of the quality of the components inside. The only EVGA PSU's I recommend are the GS, G2, PS, and P2 which are all made by SeaSonic.The PSU is one of the components of a build I advise you don't cheap out on. Take this with a grain of salt when I say the the NEXB is built down to the price.

  • 52 months ago
  • 2 points

Agreed, the EVGA NEX aren't that great. Get a supernova GS or G2 instead.... A bit more expensive but they are way better. If you're on a budget I would recommend this: https://pcpartpicker.com/part/seasonic-power-supply-s12ii520bronze

It's well rated on jonny guru and should be more than enough power if you are using the R9 380.

  • 52 months ago
  • 1 point

In that case here - PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU Intel Xeon E3-1231 V3 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor $244.99 @ SuperBiiz
Motherboard ASRock Fatal1ty H97 Killer ATX LGA1150 Motherboard $102.98 @ Newegg
Memory A-Data XPG V1.0 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory $61.99 @ Newegg
Storage Samsung 850 EVO-Series 250GB 2.5" Solid State Drive $82.89 @ OutletPC
Storage Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $49.89 @ OutletPC
Video Card XFX Radeon R9 380 4GB Double Dissipation Video Card $169.99 @ Newegg
Case Fractal Design Define R4 w/Window (Titanium Grey) ATX Mid Tower Case $74.99 @ NCIX US
Operating System Microsoft Windows 8.1 OEM (64-bit) $85.89 @ OutletPC
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total (before mail-in rebates) $903.61
Mail-in rebates -$30.00
Total $873.61
Generated by PCPartPicker 2016-02-02 11:18 EST-0500
  • 52 months ago
  • 1 point

FYI:

A SKylake i5-6500/6600 will out-perform an E3-1231 V3 in pretty much any CAD viewport.

Skylake + GeForce will be 20-40% faster than haswell + radeon in CAD viewports.

  • 52 months ago
  • 1 point

Ok, I guess I'll stick with the i5 6500, or should I upgrade to the 6600? I don't really have plans for overclocking. I'm really just looking for a great price/performance GPU tats between 200-250 USD. The 960 just seems underpowered compared to a 380 for the same price. I don't think I will be using super heavy duty CAD software in the next year or so.

  • 52 months ago
  • 3 points

i5-6600 would be great.

I think you're having a hard time getting your head around how a viewport actually works on a computer.

Every frame that is rendered by the GPU, originates with the CPU. Base frame data and render instructions are generated and issued by the CPU for every frame. The software that acts as the communication port to the GPU, the driver and API, effects the CPU workload and how it makes use of CPU execution resources.

When you're running a CAD viewport, the render detail and quality is not going to be "game-like." It's not going to be all uber fancy textures and effects and sophisticated shading and bump mapping and all that. In otherwords, there's not a lot of actual render workload for the GPU. It wouldn't matter if you were using an R7 370 or R7 390, the viewport would be CPU/software bound either way, so if the CPU doesn't change and the software optimization doesn't change, then the performance doesn't change, even though the GPU did change.

I'm suggesting you pick a GPU whose driver/API is better optimized. That means GeForce. Doesn't matter if it's a GTX950 or GTX980, they are both going to perform the same in almost any typical CAD viewport. The difference here, is that geforce driver/API's are better threaded and better optimized and support more features/instructions than radeon, thus, are better suited to use in professional applications for someone who is unwilling to consider a professional (qualified) workstation GPU.

It doesn't matter how underpowered the raw render throughput of the GPU is for this application. There's more to a GPU than raw render throughput. The GTX960 has plenty of perks you won't find on the R9 380. Like a superior hardware accelerated video engine, better compute efficiency, lower power consumption, CUDA support.

  • 52 months ago
  • 1 point

Well the way I see it is, the 960 satisfies both of your needs of CAD and gaming while the 380 does just more gaming and a bit of CAD. Sacrificing a bit of performance for the 960 to have a balance of your needs. 960= Gaming-50, CAD-50. 380= Gaming-60, CAD-40.

  • 52 months ago
  • 1 point

To the genius who is voting this down.

CAD view-ports are largely single threaded and CPU/software bound. Clock for clock, Skylake is up to 20% faster in some CAD viewports.

  • 52 months ago
  • 1 point

Surely just someone being salty. I voted it back to 1.

  • 52 months ago
  • 1 point

Just ordered my parts off of Amazon. The total was $780 for : i5 6500 Asus Strix GTX 960 4GB 8GB Kingston HyperX Fury Ram @ 1866 Fractal Design R4 Black Asus LGA 1151 H170 Motherboard Samsung Evo 250GB SSD

I still need to buy Windows and a regular HDD, but I'm going to my local Best Buy to see if they have them in stock.

  • 52 months ago
  • 1 point

1866 RAM?

Did you accidentally order DDR3????

  • 52 months ago
  • 1 point

I thought you were able to pair this motherboard and cpu with ddr3 ram

  • 52 months ago
  • 1 point

Oops I made a mistake. I did order the wrong RAM. Thanks for pointing that out! I got the 2133 Ram

  • 52 months ago
  • 1 point

excellent

  • 52 months ago
  • 1 point

There are some 1151 socket boards that have DDR3 slots. However, there would be no reason to select one of these for a new build unless you already had some low voltage DDR3 on hand to use for it.

  • 52 months ago
  • 0 points

Better quality PSU.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU Intel Core i5-6500 3.2GHz Quad-Core Processor $199.98 @ OutletPC
Motherboard MSI H170A PC Mate ATX LGA1151 Motherboard $103.98 @ OutletPC
Memory G.Skill Ripjaws V Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR4-2400 Memory $38.99 @ Newegg
Storage Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $49.89 @ OutletPC
Video Card MSI Radeon R9 380 4GB Video Card $196.99 @ NCIX US
Case Corsair 100R ATX Mid Tower Case $47.99 @ Micro Center
Power Supply EVGA SuperNOVA GS 550W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply $74.99 @ Amazon
Operating System Microsoft Windows 10 Home OEM (64-bit) $89.99 @ NCIX US
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $802.80
Generated by PCPartPicker 2016-02-02 10:36 EST-0500
  • 52 months ago
  • 0 points

Thanks for the help! I was hoping to be able to include a decent sized SSD as my boot drive and for CAD programs. Do you recommend me keeping the PSU my friend gave me to put that money towards one? I don't mind putting in an extra $30-50 USD for a better motherboard. I like the case and the build overall.

  • 52 months ago
  • 1 point

The motherboard is good as MSI is a reputable company. I recommend at least a 550W PSU for an R9 380 but I think you can get away with a 500W PSU. Also, ask your friend about the age of the PSU. For the SSD, I recommend the Samsung 850 EVO or if you are not willing to spend that much, than a Sandisk SSD should be fine.

  • 52 months ago
  • 1 point

I think the PSU is under 4 years old. I guess that's kinda old for PC parts but he said it worked fine in his build and I saw it in action with him playing games and it performed well

  • 52 months ago
  • 1 point

If you get the 960, as Allan_M_Systems suggested, then yes go with 500W and get an SSD. Going this route, you might have to replace that PSU in a year or two anyways. If you still wish to get the 380, then get the 550W GS.

  • 52 months ago
  • 0 points

If you're going to use a gaming GPU for CAD applications and other productivity applications that leverage openGL viewports, consider GeForce instead of Radeon. The openGL/DirectX implementations are a bit more complete and less apt to run into missing functionality in these sorts of applications.

Some advanced openGL viewports basically require a workstation GPU (firepro or quadro) to work properly. (example: solidworks).


PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU Intel Core i5-6500 3.2GHz Quad-Core Processor $204.95 @ Amazon
Motherboard ASRock B150M Pro4 Micro ATX LGA1151 Motherboard $83.99 @ Newegg
Memory G.Skill NT Series 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR4-2400 Memory $67.99 @ Newegg
Storage PNY CS2111 480GB 2.5" Solid State Drive $129.99 @ Amazon
Video Card MSI GeForce GTX 960 4GB Video Card $203.98 @ Newegg
Case RAIJINTEK STYX MicroATX Mini Tower Case $84.99 @ Newegg
Power Supply EVGA 750W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply $64.99 @ Amazon
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $840.88
Generated by PCPartPicker 2016-02-02 10:54 EST-0500
  • 52 months ago
  • 1 point

I think I'm just going to be doing basic CAD work with Autodesk products, Rhino, Revit. I was hoping to be able to use a 390 because it seems to perform better for the money compared to the 960. Thank you for the help!

  • 52 months ago
  • 1 point

In CAD applications, the viewport will be primarily software/CPU bound anyway, so the render throughput advantages of the R9 380 will not even show up. The software optimization (driver) and CPU performance will dictate viewport performance.

Example... In solidworks a K2200, which is a GTX750Ti running quadro drivers, will out-perform a Titan X or Fury X. All software optimization.

  • 52 months ago
  • 1 point

Whose the genius down-voting this?

Care to take responsibility and explain your reasoning?

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